JUNO BEACH.

Discussion in 'NW Europe' started by Trux, Jan 1, 2014.

  1. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    I am about to start posting my offering on Juno Beach. Four parts eventually:
    The crossing and naval Force J.
    The assault.
    The offshore organisation.
    The operation of the beach and dumps.

    The main sources are
    Landing Tables for Juno dated April 1944.
    Naval orders and reports for Force J.
    Reports and War Diaries of military units involved.

    I apologise in advance for any errors in fact, interpretation and typing. No doubt someone will correct them.

    Mike.
     
    stolpi, Owen, 4jonboy and 2 others like this.
  2. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Force J.
    Crossing.

    From D-6 Force ‘J’ vehicles loaded at hards at Stokes Bay and Southampton and then moored in the Solent. The LSIs loaded personnel while at moorings in the Solent. On the first and second days only LCMs and Rhinos were loaded, with the remainder starting on June 1st. In general loading went smoothly mainly because the ships and craft and the military units had practised several times in exercises. The driving of some ‘overheads’ was not good due to a lack of training and practice. There were delays of up to eight hours in loading some LSTs at Southampton hards. The chief cause of delay was the difficulty in backing trailers down the hards at low states of the tide. Some Movement Control Officers and Commanding Officers of LSTs admitted abandoning the loading plan and stowed awkward items as best they could.

    Once the soldiers were embarked all security was lost. The dummy maps and code names used in briefing the troops failed to hide the destination and the soldiers passed the information to the seamen who then could not be allowed to leave the ship or craft for routine administrative tasks. It had not been planned to brief seamen until the moment of sailing.

    On D-1 Force ‘J’ sailed from the Solent and went first to Area ‘Z’ and then used swept Channels 7 and 8 to cross the Channel. Unlike Sword these were not used for fast and slow convoys respectively. Each Channel carried the ships and craft for one assault beach. This meant that careful timing was required since convoys would travel at different speeds in the same Channel. Time of arrival was the most important consideration so the time of departure was based on this. Some convoys would necessarily have to overtake others en route. This would not normally be a problem but bad weather, poor visibility, strong tides and currents, radio and radar silence all combined to create potential hazards.

    It was planned that in general Assault Group J1 and Assault Group J2 would leave the Solent by the same gate. In some cases the convoys of both Assault Groups are given the same time for passing the gate but in fact the J1 Convoy went first. Later and larger convoys were given times 15 or 20 minutes apart.

    The northern entrance to each channel was marked by a FH830 sonic buoy. Developed for anti submarine warfare they were further developed as wreck markers and, as in this case, navigation buoys. They gave an underwater signal which could be detected by a ships sonar set. The entrances were further marked by HDMLs stationed some five miles north of the actual entrance. Channel 7 had HDML 1393 flashing number 7 in the direction of oncoming convoys. Channel 8 had HDML 1407 flashing 8. Both also had type 78T homing beacons to assist navigation. This transmitted a signal which could be picked up by naval radar Type 286 and 291, carried by the various headquarters and control craft. In ideal conditions the positions of the HDMLs and the sonic buoys would have been ideal, allowing convoys to line up on the channels. In the event it seems that some convoys managed to go astray between the two and enter the wrong channels. This would cause problems later.

    Mike
     
  3. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Force J.
    Channel 7.
    Apart from the Flag Group these groups were for Mike Red and Nan Green.

    Group 301. Flag Group.
    The various components of this group sailed from different mooring areas and rendezvoused at North Gate which they were timed to pass at H-12 Hours. The group was to sail at 9 knots.
    LSH Hilary, Flag Force ‘J’, carrying commanders Force ‘J’, I Corps and 3 Canadian Division.
    CMB 103, MTB 328 and MTB 344 joined from Cowes. CMB were early, small MTBs from WWI. ‘C’ for coastal.
    MTB 328 broke down and was towed back to Portsmouth.
    8 X LCI(S) carrying Commandos joined from Hamble.
    2 X LCI(S) joined from Hamble. These were spare craft which could replace any becoming casualties before sailing. If not required for that role they were to be used for close protection for Hilary and for picket duties.
    US CGC, a rescue cutter joined from Hamble.
    LCS(L)(2) 254, 255, 257. Joined from Cowes.
    HMS Algonquin. Escort.

    Group 310. Minesweeper Group.
    9 Minesweeping Flotilla to sweep and mark Channel 7.
    Fleet sweepers Sidmouth, Tenby, Bangor, Blackpool, Bridlington, Bridport, Eastbourne, Boston.
    Danlayers, Bryther, Ijuin, Delmatia, Sigma.
    Mine Sweeping ML 185, 222 and 571. Being shallow draught and unlikely to detonate mines they were to precede the sweepers.
    HDML1393. To mark the entrance to Channel 7.
    HMS Faulkner and Fury. Escorts.



    Assault Group J1.
    Carrying 7 Canadian Brigade

    Group 311. DD group.
    Passed the South Gate H-16 hours, 20 minutes.
    8 X LCT3 from 4 LCT Flotilla carrying DD tanks. LCT3 were not considered suitable for beaching in the assault phase and it was planned that they would launch DD tanks well out to sea. Because it was planned that the DD tanks would form the first wave of the assault it was essential that they should have assistance with navigation and station keeping off the beaches.
    3 X LCP(L) Navigation, 178, 202 and 134 joined from Hamble. These were to lead the DD tanks to as near the shore as possible. They carried navigation equipment and some were armoured.
    2 X LCP(Sy), 190 and 292 joined from Hamble. These survey craft were similar to the LCP(L) Navigation but were intended to follow the DD tanks and check their line of approach. They would then carry out survey work on the beaches.
    ML 902 carried Flotilla Officer, 4 LCT Flotilla. This was to follow the DD wave and maintain communications.
    6 X LCP(L) from 205 Flotilla joined from Hamble. These were to lay smoke if requested to cover the DD launching position
    LCF 1 was to provide AA protection at the DD launching position and then give cover to the assault waves.
    LCH 168. Deputy Senior Officer Assault Group. Mike Red.
    Speed 8 knots to Buoy BB then 5 knots.


    Group 312. AVRE group
    Pass South Gate H-20 hours, 10minutes.
    These craft were to form the second wave.
    8 X LCT5 from 162 LCT Flotilla carrying AVRE to create beach exits and clear obstacles.
    1 X LCT5. A spare to act as rescue tug to assist the LCTs withdraw from the beaches.
    8 X LCT(A) from 105 LCT Flotilla carrying the Centaurs of RMASG. To give artillery support until the field regiments RA could land. Some were not armoured and therefor LCT(HE).
    1 X LCT(CB) carrying two 17pdr Sherman Firefly Concrete Busters to engage strongpoints.
    1 X LCT5. A spare to act as rescue tug to assist the LCTs withdraw from the beaches.
    3 X LCM carrying engineer equipment for Field Companies RE which were to work on the beaches. They would collect personnel from the LSIs as they passed them.
    2 X LCF, 33 and 37, from 333 Support Flotilla..
    3 X LCG(L), 831, 1007 and 1062 from 333 Support Flotilla. This group will be overtaken by Group 311 at which time the three LCG(L) will join it.
    LCH 98. Deputy Senior Officer Assault Group, Nan Green.
    ML 246 carrying Deputy Senior Officer Group 312.
    703 LCP(L) Assault Flotilla. This will keep outside the swept channel. It will travel in line ahead and keep the westward buoys to starboard.
    ML 297 carrying Senior Officer LCP(L).
    9 X LCA(HR) will be towed by the LCT carrying AVREs and 2 X LCS(M) will be towed by LCT(A). They would be left to make the run in to shore under their own power.
    Speed 5 knots.

    Group 313. Artillery Group.
    Pass South Gate at H-17hours.
    15 X LCT4 from 31 LCT Flotilla carrying SP artillery.
    4 X LCT(R). 1 Division. 359, 367, 405, 437.
    ML 146 carrying Flotilla Officer 31 LCT Flotilla. Deputy Senior Officer Group 313.
    ML 151 carrying Senior Officer Group 313.
    2 X LCS(L) from 333 Support Flotilla 202 and 203.
    HMS Wrestler, escort, rendezvoused at the gate.
    Speed 6 knots.

    Group 314.
    A fast LSI Convoy. Vessels are listed in order of sailing and therefor order of arrival and mooring at the Lowering Position. Passed North Gate at H-9hours, 15min.

    LSH Lawford. Captain Assault Group J1.

    1st Division LSI.
    Invicta.
    Isle of Thanet. Carries an LCA(OC).
    MGB 312. Joining from Cowes.
    Mecklenburg.
    Prince Henry. Senior Officer LSI.
    Duke of Argyll.
    MGB 316. Joining from Cowes.

    2nd Division LSI.
    Ulster Monarch.
    Canterbury. Carries an LCA(OC).
    Lairds Isle.
    MGB 324. Joining from Cowes.
    Llangibby Castle.
    Queen Emma.

    3 X US CGC. Rescue.
    Destroyers Stevenstone, La Combattante and Venus rendezvoused at the gate.
    Speed 13 knots.


    Group 315.
    Pass South Gate at H-15 hours, 30 minutes.
    5 X LCT from 36 LCT Flotilla.
    3 X LCI(L).
    7 X LCT from 20 LCT Flotilla.
    ML 205 carrying Flotilla Officer, 20 LCT Flotilla.
    Speed 6 knots.

    More details of the ships and craft will be given when they enter the narrative later.

    Mike
     
  4. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Force J.
    Channel 8.
    Assault Group J2.
    Carrying 8 Canadian Brigade.
    Using Channel 8 for Nan White and Nan Red.

    Group 320.
    7 Minesweeping Flotilla. To sweep and mark Channel 8.
    Fleet Minesweepers Peloris, Recruit, Fancy, Lennox, Pickle, Pincher, Plucky and Rifleman.
    Dan Layers Farne, Stella Rigel, Stella Leonis and St. Barde.
    Mine Sweepimg ML 138, 139 and 208. Being shallow draught they were to precede the sweepers.
    HDML 1407. To mark the entrance to Channel 8.
    159 BYMS Flotilla. To sweep inshore.
    HMS Sioux and HMS Vigilant. Escorts rendezvoused at the gate.
    Pass North Gate at H-16hours, 40 min.

    Group 321
    8 X LCT3 from 11 LCT Flotilla carrying DD tanks. LCT3 were not considered suitable for beaching in the assault phase and it was planned that they would launch DD tanks well out to sea. Because it was planned that the DD tanks would form the first wave of the assault it was essential that they should have assistance with navigation and station keeping off the beaches.
    3 X LCP(L) Navigation, 196, 172 and 167, joined from Hamble. These were to lead the DD tanks to as near the shore as possible. They carried navigation equipment and some were armoured.
    LCP(Sy) 290 joined from Hamble. These survey craft were similar to the LCP(L) Navigation but were intended to follow the DD tanks and check their line of approach. They would then carry out survey work on the beaches.
    LCP(L) 179 joined from Hamble. Possibly standing in as LCP(Sy).
    6 X LCP(L) from 702 Flotilla joined from Hamble. These were to lay smoke if requested to cover the DD launching position.
    LCH 239 carrying Deputy Senior Officer Assault Group. Nan White.
    ML 903 carrying Flotilla Officer, 11 LCT Flotilla who is also Deputy Senior Officer Group 321. This was to follow the DD wave and maintain communications.
    6 X LCP(L) from 702 Flotilla joined from Hamble. These were to lay smoke for bombardment ships.
    Passing South Gate at H-16hours, 20min.
    Speed 8 knots to Buoy BB then 5knots.


    Group 322.
    These craft were to form the second wave.
    8 X LCT5 from 106 LCT Flotilla carrying AVRE to create beach exits and clear obstacles.
    8 X LCT(A) from 103 LCT Flotilla carrying Centaurs of RMASR. To give artillery support until the field regiments RA could land. Some were not armoured and therefor LCT(HE).
    1 X LCT(CB) carrying two 17pdr Sherman Firefly Concrete Busters to engage strongpoints..
    2 X LCT5. Spare craft as replacements if required. To act as rescue tug to assist the LCTs withdraw from the beaches.
    3 X LCM carrying engineer equipment for Field Companies RE which were to work on the beaches. They would collect personnel from the LSIs as they passed them.
    2 X LCF. 21,32.
    4 X LCG(L) from 331 Support Flotilla. Group 321 will overtake this group and the LCG(L) will join it.
    LCH 167. Deputy Senior Officer Assault Group Nan Red.
    ML 123. Flotilla Officer 106 LCT Flotilla. Deputy Senior Officer Group J22.
    9 X LCA(HR) were be towed by the LCT carrying AVREs and 2 X LCS(M) were to be towed by LCT(A). They would be left to make the run in to shore under their own power.
    Passing South Gate at H-20 hours, 10 minutes.
    Speed 5 knots.

    Group 323.
    16 X LCT4 from 22 LCT Flotilla carrying SP artillery.
    ML 147. Deputy Senior Officer Group 323.
    ML 198. Senior Officer Group 323.
    4 LCT(R) 363, 378 and 398, from 2 Division, 337 Flotilla,.
    2 X LCS(L)1, 204 and 205.
    HMS Beagle, escort, rendezvoused at the gate.
    Passing South Gate H-17 hours.
    Speed 6 knots.

    Group 324.
    A fast LSI convoy.
    Waveney. Captain Assault Group J2.

    3 LSI Division.
    Brigadier. Senior Officer LSI.
    Clan Lamont.
    St.Helier.
    MGB 317 joined from Cowes.
    Lady of Mann
    MGB 330 joined from Cowes.

    4 LSI Division.
    Duke of Wellington.
    Monowai. Carries an LCA(OC).
    Isle of Guernsey.
    MGB 326 joined from Cowes.
    Prince David. Carries an LCA(OC)

    Pass North Gate H-9 hours.
    Use Channel 8.
    13 knots.

    HMS Kempenfeldt, HMS Glaisdale and HMS Bleasdale, escorts, rendezvoused at the gate.
    3 X US CGC rescue cutters rendezvoused the gate.

    Group 325.
    7 X LCT4 from 36 LCT Flotilla.
    4 LCI(L).
    ML 269 carrying Senior Officer, 36 LCT Flotilla.
    Pass Spithead Gate at H-15 hours, 20 minutes.
    Speed 6 knots.

    Mike
     
  5. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Force J.
    Assault Group J3.

    Group 331
    This group passed Spithead Gate at H-14 hours, 55 minutes. It used Channel 7 at a speed of 6 knots.
    Royal Ulsterman carrying Captain Assault Group J3.
    12 LCI(L) from 261 Flotilla RCN sailed from Empress Dock, Southampton carrying the infantry of 9 Canadian Brigade.
    ML 247 carrying the Deputy Senior Officer sailed from Empress Dock, Southampton.
    The following all sail from Calshot.
    10 LCT4 from 36 LCT Flotilla.
    10 LCT4 from 36 LCT Flotilla.
    4 LCT3. Pre loaded stores for J1 and J2.
    2 LCF. 24, 29.
    LCT(R) 125. Carries reloads for the LCT(R) remaining off the beaches.
    HMS Versatile, escort, rendezvoused at the gate.
    US CGC. Rescue cutter.

    Group 332.
    LST group.
    This group passed Spithead Gate at H-11 hours, 30 minutes. It used Channel 7 at a speed of 6 knots.
    LSTs 215, 180, 238, 239, 621, 199, 180, 416, 62, 8 and 159. All tow Rhinos.
    M.H. Stevens. Fire Boat.
    HMS Petunia, HMS Clarkia and HMS Pink, escorts, rendezvoused at the gate.
    Northern Foam, trawler, rendezvoused at the gate.

    Group 333.
    LST group.
    This group passed Spithead Gate at H-8hours, 30 minutes. It used Channel 7 at a speed of 6 knots.
    LSTs 425, 404, 410, 409, 405, 323, 413, 401, 80 and 402. Three tow Rhinos.
    15 Rhino tugs to be towed by the group.
    Northern Sun, Northern Spray, Northern Pride, Velena, Lord Austin. Escort trawlers.


    Group L1.
    From Assault Group ‘L’ which sailed from the Thames. It used Channel 7 and was timed to arrive at the Lowering Position off Juno at H+8 hours.
    11 X LST. US.
    7 X LCI(L). 51 Division.
    LSD Northway. Carrying DUKWs.
    12 X stores coasters.
    HMS Cotswold, HMS Narcissus, HMS Oxlip and HMS Dansay. Escorts.

    Mike
     
  6. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Force J.
    By H-6 hours there was a steady flow of ships and craft which reached from Area ‘Z’ to within 10 miles of the Normandy Coast. The Fleet Minesweepers had completed their initial task and had turned away from the Normandy coast. The inshore minesweepers were ready to sweep the anchorages. The first convoys were some 20 miles away from the Lowering Point, although the fast LSI convoys, which would actually arrive first, were some distance further back. The LST convoys were at Area ‘Z’ and had not yet entered the channels.

    Force ‘J’ suffered several casualties. The first three happened early in the crossing as craft left the shelter of the Solent and met the severe weather and sea conditions in the open Channel. LCT 413 of Group 313, loaded with priority stores, broke down and was towed back to the Solent. She made the crossing under tow later in the day. LCT 2428 also broke down and anchored near Nab Tower. She later sank when in tow. MTB 328 of Group 301 broke down and returned to Portsmouth in tow.

    HMS Wrestler, escort to Group 313, spent the night rounding up stragglers and guiding stray groups into the correct channels. At 0645 on D Day she was mined. ‘She was proceeding at speed and was one cable to the eastward of Channel 7’ according to the report of Commander Force ‘J’ who also states ‘The commander had appreciated that the importance of the punctual arrival of these groups outweighed the risk to his ship by operating in unswept waters’.

    Several groups strayed into the wrong channels. Awareness of the errors was slow in developing and remedial action slow to be ordered. Group 312 carrying specialist armour for 7 Canadian Brigade got into Channel 5 instead of Channel 7, a considerable error. At 0112 the Senior Officer reported that he was in doubt but it was not until 0306 that Commander Force ‘J’ ordered him to increase speed and try to reach position QQ (the Lowering Position) on time. It was not easy to increase speed in the existing sea conditions and several of the smaller craft being towed foundered or had to be cast adrift. Some groups had problems maintaining the planned speed anyway.

    Groups 311 and 313 got into Channel 6 instead of Channel 7 and Group 323 used Channel 7 instead of Channel 8. All of these were to the westward which suggests that they did not make enough allowance for the westward current and the conditions of wind and wave.


    The number of escort vessels assigned to the convoys might seem rather small. However they were only a small part of the overall plan for protection during the crossing. It was obviously best to meet any threat well away from the swept channels and there were strong forces on both the eastern and western flanks.

    For the eastern flank, covering the British Assault Forces, Portsmouth Command deployed a large number of Coastal Forces craft, controlled by frigates and backed up by destroyers. A seven mile gun zone was established outside the channels. Any ship entering this area during the hours of darkness was to be presumed hostile. Four destroyers patrolled the outer edges of the gun zone and were only to enter the area if in close action with the enemy.

    Four frigates were used to extend the range of radar cover beyond that provided by shore stations. The frigates could be used both to control coastal forces and to support them with heavier weapons. MTBs were deployed with some accompanying the frigates while others were lying stopped and silent in pre determined positions. Coastal Forces were to be withdrawn at daylight unless visibility was poor. During daylight hours aircraft were on call.

    Portsmouth Command had three Flotillas of MTBs with 24 craft, and two Flotillas of Fairmile ‘D’ with 15 craft.

    Mike.
     
  7. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    JUNO BEACH
    7 CANADIAN BRIGADE.
    Assault Group J1.

    7 Canadian Brigade was carried across the Channel by Assault Group J1 of Naval Force ‘J’. This embarked personnel and vehicles at the Solent ports and hards and sailed on D-1.

    Assault Group J1.
    Assault Group J1 consisted of five groups. These are listed in orders dated mid May.

    Miniature Submarine X20 marked the DD launching position for the DD tanks of Assault Group JI. X 20 moved to Hilary after completing its task. It was taken in tow by the trawler Darthema and returned to Portsmouth.

    Group 311.
    Group 311 would be the first group to form up and move inshore from the Lowering Position. The main component was the flotilla of LCT3s carrying DD amphibious tanks and their escorts, navigation craft, support craft etc.

    Landing Craft Headquarters 168, a converted LCI(L), was the headquarters craft for the Deputy Senior Officer Assault Group, Mike Red. This craft had a comprehensive communications fit consisting of six B28 and one B29 Navy receivers and six army wireless set No22. One set was a transmitter/receiver on the DD net for communication with the DD tanks and their LCTs until they launched. A TCS VHF radio telephone gave access to Senior Officers VHF Wave. The army sets were transmitter/receivers for speech and Morse and were used for communications with the army DD net and SP Field Artillery net and brigade headquarters.

    Eight LCT3 of 4 LCT Flotilla carried the DD tanks of ‘A’ and ‘B’ Squadrons, 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment. The Flotilla Officer, 4 LCT Flotilla was carried on ML 902. These travelled in two columns to the Launching Points.

    Three LCP(L) DD Navigation Leaders, 178, 202 and 134, were to lead the DD tanks to shore. These were generally fitted with armour and carried navigation equipment including HS2 navigation equipment. Possibly one at least carried a Combined Operations Pilotage Party Officer.

    Two LCP(Sy) Survey, 190 and 292 were to follow the DD tanks to provide a navigation check if necessary. They were then to survey the area off the beaches, partly to find obstacles and partly to identify the best landing places for LCTs.

    Six LCP(L) of 205 Flotilla were available to lay smoke to cover the launching of DD tanks if required. This would normally be only if the DD tanks came under fire from shore batteries. They were also available to assist with launching and to act as rescue craft.

    Three LCG(L) of 333 Flotilla, 831, 1007 and 1062, plus one LCF(2), No1, were to cover the launch of DD tanks. If the tanks were fired on by shore batteries then they should return fire, otherwise LCG would engage beach defences from H-30 minutes. LCG 831 and LCF 1 were to engage beach defences on Mike. LCG 1062 and 1007 were to engage beach defences on Nan Green. The LCG and LCF were to accompany the assault waves, giving close support as necessary. When no longer required for close support the Naval Force Commander was to informed and he would attach them to Forward Observers Bombardment for indirect bombardment. They were to concentrate in flotillas on the flanks and keep clear of incoming craft.


    Group 312.
    The main components of Group 312 were the LCT5s from 162 LCT Flotilla carrying AVREs and the LCT(A)s from 105 LCT Flotilla carrying Centaurs of the Royal Marine Armoured Support Regiment.

    Group 312 was commanded by Deputy Senior Officer Assault Group, Nan Green on LCH 98. This was similarly equipped to LCH 168 above but with sets on the AVRE and RMASR nets. ML 246 carried the Deputy Senior Officer Group 312.

    Ten LCT5 carried the AVREs of the Breaching and Clearance Teams. Nine of the LCT5 each towed a LCA(HR) (Hedgehog) although only one survived the crossing.

    Four LCT(A) and four LCT(HE) carried Centaur Close Support tanks of the Royal Marine Support Regiment. One LCT(CB) (Concrete Buster) carried two Sherman Firefly 17 pdr tanks to engage concrete bunkers.

    Three LCM carrying RE parties and their equipment for beach clearance.

    Two LCF, 33 and 37, gave anti aircraft support on the approach and then were available for AA defence off the beaches.

    703 LCP(L) Flotilla was to provide smoke. The Senior Officer LCP(L) was carried in ML 297.

    Two LCS(M) towed by LCTs. These would carry Forward Observation Officers Bombardment RA for the Field Regiments of Group 313. They would observe the fall of shot during the run in.


    Group 313.
    ML 151 carries Senior Officer Group 313.

    Fifteen LCT4 from 31 LCT Flotilla carrying SP artillery. ML 146 carries the Flotilla Officer, 31 Flotilla and Deputy Senior Officer Assault Group 313.

    Four LCT(R) from 1 Division of 320 LCT Flotill, 359, 367, 405 and 437. LCT(R) operated in pairs. In each pair one would fire a pattern of rockets at H-8 minutes and the second would fire at H-5 minutes. Both would aim at the same area which would extend across the beach to be assaulted and be 300 yards deep. From their assigned position they would need to aim the entire craft. LCT(R) 367 and 359 would fire on Mike on bearing 184 degrees. LCT(R) 437 and 405 would fire on Nan Green on bearing 180 degrees.

    Two LCS(L), 202 and 203, provided smoke and close support as ordered by Senior Officers Assault Groups.


    Group 314.
    This was a fast LSI Convoy carrying the assault infantry battalions. Vessels are listed in the order of sailing and therefor order of arrival and mooring at the Lowering Position. One LSI in each division carried an LCA(OC), Obstacle Clearance, in place of an LCA.

    Landing Ship Headquarters Lawford. Captain, Senior Officer Assault Group J1. HMS Lawford was a US built Destroyer Escort, Classed as Frigates in RN. They were 290 foot long, could manage 20 knots and as built carried three single 3 inch guns, two 40mm guns and ten 20mm guns. For the headquarters role they had the aft 3” gun removed and the superstructure extended to provide extra space. Two deck houses were added for communications equipment, a mast was added for aerials and four extra radars fitted (Types 242, 253, 271 and 391). The crew was 200 and an extra 240 were carried in the headquarters role.

    Lawford was sunk off Juno on 8th June. It was reported that it had been hit by an aerial torpedo which is now thought to have been a guided bomb.


    1st Division LSI.
    The LSIs in this division were all similar in size and speed, being originally built as ferries. Prince Henry was larger being built for longer journeys but the rest were cross Channel ferries in peacetime. All were capable of more than 20 knots but were scheduled to travel at 13 knots on the crossing.

    Invicta, J15 was a cross Channel ferry requisitioned while building in 1939. She was 4,178 tons, 347 foot long and capable of 22 knots. She carried five LCA and one LCS(M) from 510 Assault Flotilla, and had accommodation for 250 troops.

    Isle of Thanet, J14 was a Southern Railway cross Channel ferry converted to LSI from a FAA target ship in 1943. She was 2,700 tons, 337 foot long and capable of 23 knots. She carried an four LCA, one LCA(OC) and one LCS(M) from 505 Assault Flotilla.

    Mecklenburg, J17 was a cross Channel ferry built in 1922. She was 2,900 tons, 350 foot long and capable of 22 knots. She carried six LCA from 511 Assault Flotilla.

    Prince Henry, J20 carried the Senior Officer LSI. She was one of two fast Canadian ferries converted to Armed Merchant Cruisers. She was extensively modified for the role and had the bridge moved further astern and had one funnel removed. She was 6,890 tons, 385 foot long and was capable of 22 knots. She carried eight LCA from 528 Assault Flotilla and had accommodation for 444 troops.
    Armament: 2 X 4”, 1 X 40mm, 6 X 20mm.

    Duke of Argyll, J19 was a LMSR ferry built in 1928 and fitted out as LSI in 1942. She was 3,743 tons, 358 foot long and was capable of 21 knots. She carried six LCA from 517 Assault Flotilla and had accommodation for 250 troops.

    MGB 312 and 316 accompanied this fast convoy.


    2nd Division LSI.
    Ulster Monarch, J11, was an Irish Sea ferry. She was 3,790 tons, 359 foot long and could do 21 knots. She carried five LCA from 521 Assault Flotilla and had accommodation for 580 troop. Armament: 1 X 12 pdr, 2 X 2pdr, 4 X 20mm.

    Canterbury, J12, was Southern Railway Cross Channel ferry built in 1929. She was 2,900 tons, 330 foot long and could do 21 knots. She carried six LCA Canterbury from 509 Assault Flotilla including an LCA(OC).

    Lairds Isle, J13, was an old ferry built in 1911. She had a varied wartime career including Armed Boarding Vessel and Target Ship. She was 1,929 tons, 323 foot long and could do 22 knots. She carried six LCA from 516 Assault Flotilla.

    Llangibby Castle, J16, was a Merchant Navy LSI from the Union Castle Line. A large cargo liner built in 1929 she was 11,951 tons, 507 foot long and could do 15 knots. She carried fourteen LCA from Royal Marine Flotilla 577 and had accommodation for 1,500 troops. Llangibby Castle was a hard working LSI which had already been used as a troopship, then as an LSI in the Torch Operation. After D Day she then made nearly seventy trips to Omaha and Utah Beaches and to Le Havre, carrying some 100,000 troops to the Continent. She then went to the Far East.

    Queen Emma.
    Queen Emma. J18, was a fast Dutch Cross Channel ferry built in 1939. She was 4,136 tons, 380 foot long and could do 23 knots. She could carry two LCM and six LCA but carried eight LCA of 526 Assault Flotilla on this occasion. There was accommodation for 372 troops. Armament was 2 X 12 pdr, 2 X 2pdr, 6 X 20mm.

    MGB 324 accompanied this group.

    Group 315.
    - Five LCT of 36 Flotilla.
    - Three LCI(L).
    - Seven LCT of 20 Flotilla.
    - ML 205. Flotilla Officer 20 Flotilla. Senior Officer.

    All the above groups should have arrived in the above order and then form waves for the run in to shore. Some advanced groups had difficulty in finding their correct swept channels and used the wrong ones. This caused delays and problems later. Group 312 carrying the AVREs for 7 Canadian Brigade got into Channel 5 instead of Channel 7. At 0112 the Senior Officer reported that he was in doubt. At 0306 Commodore Force J order Group 312 to increase speed and try to reach the Lowering Position on time. This increase in speed was probably the reason why all but one of the LCA(HR) being towed by the LCTs foundered or had to cut adrift. Group 311 carrying the DD tanks and Group J13 got into Channel 6 instead of Channel 7.

    It was thought that the wind, tide and current carried the group westwards and into the wrong channel. All channels seem to have been correctly marked with dan buoys and the entrances to them marked by HDMLs.

    The delays caused by groups entering the wrong channels and by groups simply not been able to maintain the planned speeds meant that some adjustments to H hour had to be made. H Hour had already been altered when it was reported that the depth of water over rocks on the approach to the beaches was less than planned for. By 0630 the Captains Senior Officer Assault Group J1 and Senior Officer Assault Group J2 reported that H Hour would be postponed on their beaches by a further 10 minutes. H Hour would now be 0745 for Assault Group J1 and 0755 for Assault Group J2. The Commander Easter Task Force also ordered that Assault Group J1 should not wait for the group carrying AVREs for 7 Canadian Brigade.

    As a result of the postponement the first waves of landing craft would not now land in front of the beach obstacles as planned but would have to land among them. It was also not possible to clear the obstacles before the LCTs arrived. The knock on effect was that a great many craft were damaged when either beaching, or more often when retracting.

    In the event the final approach of the assault craft was not the orderly sequence of groups and timings of the tables, diagrams and exercises.

    Mike
     
  8. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    7 Canadian Brigade.
    7 Canadian Brigade were to land either side of the town and port of Courseulles and the River Seulles. This meant that in the early stages the two assault battalions and their supporting units were cut off from one another.

    The two beaches, Mike and Nan Green, were different in character. Mike was a area of coastal deposition where the drift along the coast from west to east deposited sand to form dunes. These dunes had built up until they were between one hundred and two hundred yards deep. On Mike Green to the west this had affected the drainage so that the area inland tended to be damp and liable to flood. A series of drainage ditches had been dug to help drain the land. On Mike Red the deposition had blocked the River Seulles access to the sea and forced it into a loop. A harbour and docks had been built so as to cut off the loop. The area inside the loop was largely waste or oyster beds. Mike did not have the beach villas which were a feature of much of the coast. There were so few landmarks that incoming craft had difficulty in identifying the correct point on which to beach.

    Nan Green was an area of coastal erosion and here there were the various works to prevent, control or delay the effects. There were groynes built out to sea to try and stop the movement of sand. On D Day the presence of the groynes together with the strong current along the beach and the beach obstacles made landings, and lateral movement along the beach, tricky. Most of the coast was further protected by sea walls. Inland were the buildings of Courseulles.

    The main defences were naturally on either side of the Seulles estuary and port. Strongpoint WN31 to the west of the river had a 75mm field gun in a casemate facing west along the beach, a 50mm gun in a casemate and another 50mm gun in an open pit emplacement at the western end of the position. There was a 50mm gun in a casemate that could fire east or west overlooking the harbour. The rear of the position was protected by the loop of he river.

    WN 29 was on the east of the river. This had a 88mm antitank gun and two 75mm field guns, one German and one French, all in concrete casemates and firing east. There was a 50mm gun in an open pit emplacement and a Tobruk pillbox with 37mm gun. There was a substantial anti tank ditch inland.

    A Company of the Canadian Scottish Regiment were to land on the right flank to clear a single gun position.


    By H+120 minutes 7 Canadian Brigade had succeeded in landing its three battalions and most of their tactical transport, although much of this was still waiting to exit the beach. 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment was ashore and although most of the DD tanks of the first wave had been able to move inland the reserve squadron was delayed at the exits. Similarly the Field Regiments RA were ashore but had to deploy on the beach until they could use the exits.

    Mike.
     
  9. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Mike Beach
    H – 5 Minutes.

    6 Canadian Armoured Regiment.
    The squadrons each landed with twenty Sherman MkV DD tanks. These were carried in four LCT MkIII per squadron with five tanks in each LCT. All the DD tanks were 75mm armed, no Firefly were converted although some would join the squadrons later.

    There has been some debate over the years as to whether a DD squadron had nineteen or twenty tanks. Original sources mostly give twenty but no definitive answer has been found.

    The original, April, Landing Table shows a mixture of Sherman DD and Valentine DD. By May they were all Sherman. It also shows the last serial in each squadron carrying only four tanks.

    Each LCT was to be accompanied by a LCP(L) Smoke, primarily to provide a smoke screen if the enemy opened fire on the Launching Point or on the DD tanks on their swim in, but they were also available to assist with launching the DD tanks and to act as rescue craft.

    The intention was that ‘‘A’ Squadron of 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment would be launched from the LCTs 6,000 yards out to sea and then swim to shore. It would land on Mike Green and Mike Red in support of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles.


    Four LCT3 from 4 LCT Flotilla carry ‘A’ Squadron, 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment.
    ‘A’ Squadron, 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment.
    Mike Green.
    *Serial 1000 is an LCT3 from 4 LCT Flotilla carrying
    5 Sherman DD Tanks with 25 crew from ‘A’ Squadron.

    *Serial 1001 is an LCT3 from 4 LCT Flotilla carrying
    5 Sherman MkV DD Tanks with 25 crew from ‘A’ Squadron.
    The Squadron Commander rides in this craft therefor this should be the Flotilla Commanders craft .

    Mike Red.
    *Serial 1002 is an LCT3 from 4 LCT Flotilla carrying
    5 Sherman MkV DD Tanks with 25 crew from ‘A’ Squadron.

    *Serial 1003 is an LCT3 from 4 LCT Flotilla carrying
    5 Sherman MkV DD Tanks with 25 crew from ‘A’ Squadron.

    The run in to shore by the LCTs started in good order but when the planned launching point was reached it seemed that the weather would not permit the tanks to swim in. The Deputy Senior Officer Assault Group ordered the DD tanks to remain in the craft, which were then to be beached. When the craft reached 1000 to 2000 yards from the shore the DSOAG changed his mind and ordered the DD tanks to be launched. These changes caused some confusion. When ‘A’ Squadron received the order they were not in the correct formation for launching and were under mortar fire. Two LCT launched their DD tanks successfully. A third LCT launched only one DD tank before the ramp chains were shot off by enemy fire. This LCT proceeded to the beach with the remaining four DD tanks. It hit a mine and developed a list. It later hit a second mine but managed to land one DD tank. A second DD tank damaged its screen and sank. The remaining two DD tanks were trapped in the damaged craft and were not landed until the afternoon. The fourth LCT accompanied the damaged craft to shore and landed its DD tanks.

    Thus eleven tanks were successfully launched but one was lost after being run down by an LCT(R) and two drowned near the shore. Six of the remaining tanks were landed from the LCTs which beached and two more landed in the afternoon.

    The first tanks reached the shore just after the initial infantry waves but timings are confused. One tank was knocked out on the beach and the squadron second in command’s tank had its gun disabled.

    ‘A’ Squadron claim to have knocked out two 75mm guns, one 50mm gun and six machine guns. The Squadron Commander reported that shortly after the tanks deflated and began to engage the fortifications the enemy surrendered, not having expected to encounter tanks at such an early stage.

    An hour to an hour and a half elapsed before the tanks could move off the beach. As soon as the exits were open the squadron split into three groups:
    - Two tanks to support ‘C’ Company 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment
    - Four tanks to support ‘B’ Company Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    - Four tanks to support ‘D’ Company Royal Winnipeg Rifles.

    Mike.
     
  10. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Mike Beach
    H Hour.
    The Breaching Teams
    On Juno the Breaching Teams were separate from the Obstacle Clearing Teams. The units of the Assault Squadrons RE did not initially have a role in obstacle clearance, although they could be called on to assist later. The Breaching Teams were given two additional LCT which were given the suffix A. These carried reserve vehicles for the half squadron. Each LCT towed a LCA(HR) but only one arrived safely, the others having foundered or being cut adrift, apparently because they were towed too fast through heavy seas.

    26 Assault Squadron
    26 Assault Squadron landed under the command of 7 Canadian Brigade.
    Five LCT5 from 162 LCT Flotilla carried Breaching Teams which were to make two exits from the beach.

    Mike Green. Green Gap (M1), 1 Troop.
    *Serial 1018 is an LCT5 from 162 LCT Flotilla carrying
    2 Sherman Crab with 10 crew from 2 Troop, ‘B’ Squadron, 22 Dragoons.
    1 AVRE with Bobbin and 6 crew from 1 Troop, 26 Assault Squadron RE
    1 D7 Armoured Bulldozer with 2 crew from 1 Troop 26 Assault Squadron RE

    *Serial 1019 is an LCT5 from 162 LCT Flotilla carrying
    1 Sherman Crab with 5 crew from 2 Troop, ‘B’ Squadron 22 Dragoons.
    1 AVRE with Fascine and 6 crew from 1 Troop 26 Assault Squadron RE
    1 AVRE with SBG Bridge and 6 crew from 1 Troop 26 Assault Squadron RE
    1 BARV with 6 crew from 22 Beach Recovery Section.


    Mike Red. Yellow Gap (M2), 2 Troop.
    *Serial 1020 is an LCT5 from 162 LCT Flotilla carrying
    1 Sherman Crab with 5 crew from 2 Troop, ‘B’ Squadron 22 Dragoons.
    1 AVRE with Bullshorn Plough and 6 crew from 2 Troop, 26 Assault Squadron RE. Tows a Porpoise.
    1 AVRE with SBG and 6 crew from 2 Troop, 26 Assault Squadron RE
    1 AVRE Command with 6 crew from 2 Troop, 26 Assault Squadron RE. Major OC

    *Serial 1421 is an LCT5 from 162 LCT Flotilla carrying
    1 Sherman Crab with 5 crew from 2 Troop, ‘B’ Squadron 22 Dragoons.
    1 AVRE with Fascine and 6 crew from 2 Troop, 26 Assault Squadron RE
    1 AVRE with SBG Bridge and 6 crew from 2 Troop, 26 Assault Squadron RE
    1 AVRE with 6 crew from 2 Troop, 26 Assault Squadron RE. Captain 2ic.


    Half Squadron Reserve.
    *Serial 1019A is an LCT5 from 162 LCT Flotilla carrying
    3 AVRE with 18 crew from 2 Troop, 26 Assault Squadron RE.
    1 BARV with 6 crew from 22 Beach Recovery Section.

    The Landing Table carries a note that the LCT5s were fitted with rollers.


    1 and 2 Troops 26 Assault Squadron had perhaps the most difficult task but demonstrated versatility and initiative and succeeded in opening a gap with few casualties, although somewhat behind schedule.

    1 Troop touched down at 0800 but in the wrong location, opposite Yellow Gap (M1). This was mistaken for Green Gap and so work was started. Flails made a lane to and through the dunes. On the far side of the dunes they came to a crater some twenty foot by 9 foot and attempted to by pass it. In doing so they both lost a track to mines. It is not clear why but presumably they had to raise the flail booms. The third flail then cleared a route forward to a point 150 yards inland where a culvert had been blown and dammed to form a water obstacle sixty foot wide and twelve foot deep. This was surrounded by shallow flooding which made the limits of the obstacle difficult to see. The flail reversed to clear the path for AVREs but became ditched in deep mud. It remained immobile for the rest of the day but continued to use its guns in support. The fascine AVRE approached the obstacle in order to place its load but it misjudged the edge due to the flooding and fell in and became submerged. The crew baled out but were mortared and three were killed and three wounded.

    In the meantime 2 Troop had touched down at 0810 at its correct place and found 1 Troop already at work. It placed its SBG bridge to the right of the gap and its flail crossed, but hit a mine and blocked the route. 2 troop then moved up to assist 1 Troop. The remaining flails had damaged their booms on landing and could not flail but did give covering fire. Fascines were placed in the first crater and a SBG bridge was brought up to the culvert. The fascine of the submerged AVRE was pushed into the water and the bridge dropped onto the submerged tanks turret. Chespales and logs were carried up from the beach and used to make a causeway. This work was done by sappers on foot and under fire, but with the support of the guns of the disabled flails and a number of DD tanks which were in the dunes.

    At 0915 the first DD tanks of 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment were able to cross the causeway, together with some infantry. When six tanks had crossed the SBG began to slip and traffic was halted while it was secured. Four more tanks crossed but the fifth slipped and became bogged. This was towed off by an AVRE which was standing by for the purpose. Soon afterwards the first SP gun attempted to cross. This became so firmly bellied on the bridge that it took three bulldozers linked together and two AVREs to clear it. While traffic was halted the opportunity was taken to improve the causeway with various materials including rubble from damaged houses with the help of a horse and cart impressed from a French farmer. 2 troop then opened the weir which was causing the flooding in the culvert.

    By 1000 Beach Group sappers were working on the causeway, the exit and the road. This lane was reported to be working satisfactorily at 1140 This formed SBG bridge remained in operation from until 1330. Later the culvert was filled in, covering the AVRE.

    2 Troop took an SBG bridge inland but it was not used. The Officer Commanding then carried out a reconnaissance of the route to Courseulles, removed mines from a bridge, operated a swing bridge and opened a route between Mike and Nan Beaches at 1200. The lateral road along the coast and behind the dunes was also open by this time.

    While work was being carried out on Yellow Gap parties had carried out a reconnaissance to the flank and Green Gap was opened and ready to carry traffic by 0930. This does not seem to have presented any problems. Manual labour and dozers made a gap in the dunes, chespale track was laid and mines cleared.

    Mike,
     
  11. Trux

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    Mike Beach.
    H Hour.
    2 Royal Marine Support Regiment
    ‘A Flotilla of LCT(A) HE will land with Centaur tanks of 3 Battery, 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment. These LCTs will also carry teams of engineers and personnel for beach obstacle clearance.’

    Orders and Landing Tables refer to LCT(A) HE. Naval sources are clear that craft were either LCT(A) which were armoured or LCT(HE) which were not. The four craft landing Centaurs on Mike Beach were all LCT(A).

    Mike Green
    ‘P’ Troop.
    *Serial 1008 is an LCT(A) from 105 LCT Flotilla carrying
    2 Centaur Tanks with 10 crew from 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment. Tow Porpoise MkII.
    5 men from 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment. Ammunition handlers.
    Space for 50 rounds extra ammunition stowed loose.

    2 D7 Armoured Bulldozer with 4 men vehicle party from Headquarters RCE 3 Canadian Division Special Bulldozer Increment
    1 Car 5cwt 4X4 (Jeep) with 3 crew from 18 Canadian Field Company RCE.
    11 men and an Airborne Truck from 18 Canadian Field Company RCE.


    *Serial 1009 is an LCT(HE) from 105 LCT Flotilla carrying
    2 Centaur Tanks with 10 crew from 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment. Tow Porpoise MkII.
    5 men from 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment. Ammunition handlers.
    1 Sherman Tank with 5 crew from 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment
    Space for 50 rounds extra ammunition stowed loose.

    2 D7 Armoured Bulldozer with 4 men vehicle party from Headquarters RCE 3 Canadian Division Special Bulldozer Increment
    13 men and an Airborne Truck from 18 Canadian Field Company RCE.
    12 men from ‘A’ Company, 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group.


    *Serial 1010 is an LCT(A) from 105 LCT Flotilla carrying
    4 D7 Armoured Bulldozer with 8 men vehicle party from Headquarters RCE 3 Canadian Division Special Bulldozer Increment
    24 men and an airborne trailer from 18 Canadian Field Company RCE.
    3 Carriers Mortar with 6 crew from Royal Winnipeg Rifles
    9 men from Royal Winnipeg Rifles.


    Mike Red
    ‘Q’ Troop.
    *Serial 1011 is an LCT(A) from 105 LCT Flotilla carrying
    2 Centaur Tanks with 10 crew from 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment. Tow Porpoise MkII.
    5 men from 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment. Ammunition handlers.
    Space for 50 rounds extra ammunition stowed loose.

    4 D7 Armoured Bulldozer with 8 men vehicle party from Headquarters RCE 3 Canadian Division Special Bulldozer Increment.
    24 men and an airborne trailer from 5 Canadian Field Company RCE.
    12 men from ‘B’ Company, 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group.


    *Serial 1012 is an LCT(A) from 105 LCT Flotilla carrying
    2 Centaur Tanks with 10 crew from 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment. Tow Porpoise MkII.
    5 men from 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment. Ammunition handlers.
    1 Sherman Tank with 5 crew from 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment
    1 Carrier Universal with 2 crew from 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment
    Space for 50 rounds extra ammunition stowed loose.

    6 men from ‘B’ Company, 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group.


    *Serial 1013 is an LCT(CB) carrying
    2 Sherman Vc Firefly with 8 crew from 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment
    Space for extra ammunition

    The two Sherman Vc Firefly were to give fire support in the final stages of the approach. It was found that the 17pdr guns were very effective against concrete pillboxes and they could be called on to give support to the DD tanks or the infantry. During the approach the two Fireflies had a list of specific targets which they were to engage and destroy. It is reported that they carried out the plan but it is not known with what success. Both seem to have landed and eventually moved inland. While doing so one was knocked out by a 50mm anti tank gun and the commander, a Lieutenant was killed.

    ‘P’ and ‘Q’ Troops of 3 Battery, 2 Royal Marine Support Regiment were unlucky on the Channel crossing. During the night a large vessel was reported to have driven through the flotilla and split it. One craft with two Centaurs of ‘Q’ Troop on board was lost at sea, one did not arrive until D+1 and the others did not beach until later, between 0900 and 0945, thus arriving at the same time as the artillery regiment they were supposed to be standing in for. When they did land they were held up on the beaches and three Centaurs of ‘P’ Troop were immobilised when their tracks were damaged in the shingle. No calls for fire were received but they did round up some prisoners and silence a machine gun nest.

    Mike
     
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    Mike Beach.
    H Hour.

    Obstacle Clearance Teams.
    The Landing tables that were prepared in April 1944 were later modified to take into account the increased number of beach obstacles that were being installed. As yet no Landing Tables have been found for some of these units.

    5 Canadian Field Company was tasked with clearing underwater obstacles and creating four gaps. For this purpose it was equipped with explosives and bulldozers. The intention was to break the obstacles up and then collect them on the beaches above the high water mark where they would be out of the way of incoming craft and traffic. 5 Canadian Field Company would provide four sections for each assault brigade front and be assisted by one platoon of 18 Canadian Field Company and two RN LCOCU per beach.

    18 Canadian Field Company RCE was a Divisional Field Company. Initially it was to land with the Royal Marine Armoured Support Regiment to assist with the clearing of beach obstacles. 3 Canadian Division Special Bulldozer Increment was also to land from LCTs carrying Royal Marine Armoured Support Regiment vehicles for obstacle clearance. The beach obstacles were submerged soon after H hour and the clearance teams did not succeed in clearing many obstacles before they were forced to abandon the task. The teams were set to work on first clearing mines from the beach, although few were found, and then working on the beach exits until the tide went out and they could continue their clearance task.

    The Landing Tables show three parties each with 24 men and an airborne trailer from 18 Canadian Field Company and four D7 Bulldozers from 3 Canadian Division Special Bulldozer Increment. In addition there was a jeep and airborne trailer, presumably from Company Headquarters.

    Since the craft carrying the Royal Marine Support Regiment were late arriving it follows that the sappers of 18 Canadian Field Company and the D7 Dozers of 3 Canadian Division Special Bulldozer Increment were also late since they were carried in the same craft. Since it was not possible for these units to perform their task of obstacle clearance because of the high tide the late arrival was not crucial and is not specifically mentioned in reports. It does seem however that none of the 18 Field Company vehicles or personnel were on the LCT(A)s that failed to arrive. 5 Canadian Field Company did land, slightly behind schedule.

    Two platoons of 262 Field Company RE per beach would land at H+20 minutes and reinforce the obstacle clearing parties.


    Landing Craft Obstacle Clearance Units.
    The army engineers were assisted in the task of clearing obstacles by RN Landing Craft Obstacle Clearance Units. These were specially trained and equipped to deal with obstacles in more than three foot of water. They were also to mark the gaps and any obstacles within them. 1 and 5 LCOCU landed on 7 Brigade front. Each unit had its own LCA which carried the units special equipment and they landed with the first wave of infantry. They soon found that the water was too deep for them to work on the seaward belt of obstacles and they moved on to those further up the beach. When they had to abandon this task they used their skills and equipment to assist with rescue work on the beach. There are reports of them taking ropes out to landing craft for personnel to hang on to as they waded through the waves. They also used their underwater gear to attach tow ropes to vehicles so they could be towed ashore.

    Mike.
     
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    Mike Beach
    H Hour.

    Assault Infantry
    Royal Winnipeg Rifles land with one company 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment under command.

    Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    The assault battalion landing on Mike Beach, on the right of the brigade front. One company of 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment was under command, and landed on the right. ‘D’ Company Royal Winnipeg Rifles landed in the centre and ‘B’ Company on the right. Each company was accompanied by a party of sappers from 6 Canadian Field Company. Battalion Headquarters, ‘A’ Company and ‘C’ Company landed at H+20.

    *Serials 1032 to 1036 were 5 LCAs of 509 Assault Flotilla from LSI J12, Canterbury, carrying
    127 men from ‘D’ Company Royal Winnipeg Rifles
    7 men from Royal Winnipeg Rifles Pioneer Section
    3 men from 12 Canadian Field Regiment SP. Forward Observation Officer

    *Serial 1037 was an LCS(M) of 509 Assault Flotilla from LSI J12, Canterbury, carrying
    4 men from 12 Canadian Field Regiment SP. Bombardment FOO No2. To land as required.

    Note that three Carriers Mortar from the Royal Winnipeg Rifles were also to land from LCT(A) although probably not at this time.


    1 Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    1 Canadian Scottish Regiment was the Brigade reserve but ‘C’ Company landed at H Hour under the command of Royal Winnipeg Rifles.

    Mike Green
    *Serials 1026 to 1030 were 5 LCAs of 521 Assault Flotilla from LSI J11, Ulster Monarch, carrying
    127 men from ‘C’ Company 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment
    7 men from 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment Pioneer Section. To clear wire with Bangalores.
    3 men from 12 Canadian Field Regiment SP. Forward Observation Officer

    *Serial 1031 was an LCS(M) of 521 Assault Flotilla from LSI J11, Ulster Monarch, carrying
    4 men from 13 Canadian Field regiment SP. Bombardment Forward Observation Officer No2. To land as required. To observe the effects of the bombardment by field artillery during the run in and to control the fire of Royal Marine Centaurs in support of the infantry companies.


    1 Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    Mike Red
    *Serials 1038 to 1043 were 6 LCAs of 516 Assault Flotilla from LSI J13, Laird’s Isle, carrying
    164 men from ‘B’ Company 1 Royal Winnipeg Rifles
    8 men from Pioneer Section 1 Royal Winnipeg Rifles. To clear wire with Bangalores.
    3 men from 12 Canadian Field Regiment SP. Forward Observation Officer
    18 men from 6 Canadian Field Company RCE. Demolition and mine clearing teams.


    6 Canadian Field Company RCE.
    A 3 Canadian Division unit. It provided assault demolition teams and mine clearing teams for the assault companies.

    Each assault company had one assault demolition team of five men organised as
    NCO, leader
    Beehive Team, 2 men each carrying a section of a 75lb Beehive on a Yukon pack.
    Beehive man carrying a light (40lb) Beehive.
    Flame man carrying a portable flame thrower.
    The Beehive was to kill the occupants of concrete emplacements by firing Beehive charges against the roof or walls. Flame was used to kill the occupants by firing it through the apertures in an emplacement.

    Each assault company also had a four man mine clearing team.

    Mike.

    Further details of the above organisations may be found in the Sword Beach posts on this forum. We cannot be certain that 3 Canadian Division's battalions used an organisation identical to that 3 British Division on Sword but coming from the same Corps they would be very similar.
     
  14. Trux

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    Mike Beach.
    H + 20 Minutes
    The Reserve Companies of the Assault Battalions land together with attached personnel and reconnaissance parties from units due to land later.

    Mike Green
    Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    *Serials 1056 to 1061were 6 LCAs of 577 Flotilla from LSI J16 Llangibby Castle carrying
    127 men from ‘A’ Company Royal Winnipeg Rifles
    15 men from Battalion Headquarters Royal Winnipeg Rifles
    1 man from Headquarters 7 Canadian Brigade. Padre attached to Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    3 men from Royal Winnipeg Rifles. Unit Landing Officers party.

    3 men from 12 Canadian Field Regiment SP RCA. Forward Observation Officer attached to Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    7 men from 12 Canadian Field Regiment SP RCA. Reconnaissance party to prepare for the landing of the Field Regiment.

    1 man from Inns of Court Regiment. Unit Landing Officer.
    3 men from Regina Rifles. Unit Landing Officers party.
    3 men from 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment. Unit Landing Officers party
    2 men from 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment. Unit Landing Officer.

    7 men from ‘A’ Company, 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group reconnaissance party.
    6 men from 85 Field Company RE. Reconnaissance party
    2 men from RN Beach Party.
    3 men from RN 13 Beach Signals.
    4 men from 14 Beach Signals.


    *Serials 1062 to 1067 were 6 LCAs of 577 Flotilla from LSI J16 Llangibby Castle carrying
    90 men from ‘C’ Company, Royal Winnipeg Rifles
    15 men from Battalion Headquarters, Royal Winnipeg Rifles
    3 men from Royal Winnipeg Rifles. Unit Landing Officers party.
    2 men from J Section 3 Canadian Division Signals.

    1 man from 6 Canadian Field Company RCE. Platoon Commander.
    3 men from 12 Canadian Field Regiment SP RCA. Forward Observation Officer.
    5 men from Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (MG)
    19 men from 14 Canadian Field Ambulance Assault Section. Plus 8 spaces for Medical Stores.

    3 men from 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment. Unit Landing Officers party
    2 men from 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment. Unit Landing Officer.
    7 men from 13 Canadian Field Regiment SP RCA. Reconnaissance party.

    7 men from A Company 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group reconnaissance party.
    6 men from 85 Field Company RE. Reconnaissance party
    2 men from RN Beach Party.
    3 men from RN 13 Beach Signals.
    4 men from 14 Beach Signals.


    The following will be ferried ashore from a LCH by LCA as required.
    *Serial 1080 is a LCH.
    7 men from Royal Winnipeg Rifles. Command Group.
    3 men from 3 Canadian Division. Contact Detachment
    3 men from RN Forward Observation Bombardment Unit F 64
    1 man from J Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Division Signals
    3 men from 12 Canadian Field Regiment SP. Commanding Officer.
    2 men from ‘E’ Section (12 Field Regiment), 3 Canadian Division Signals

    15 men from RN Beach Parties
    8 men from RN 13 Beach Signals
    8 men with 4 handcarts from 14 Beach Signals

    Mike
     
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    Mike Beach.
    H+45 Minutes.
    This and subsequent timings for beaching of craft are the time aimed at. They may be varied as the situation demands by the Brigade Commander in consultation with Captain, Senior Officer Assault Group J1 (RN).

    The Reserve Battalion of 7 Canadian Brigade lands together with personnel from supporting units and Beach Group.
    Mike Green
    1 Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    *8 LCAs from LSI J18. Queen Emma.
    *6 LCAs from LSI J19. Duke of Argyll.
    *8 LCAs from LSI J20. Prince Henry.

    127 men from ‘A’ Company,
    18 men from Battalion Headquarters. Commanding Officer’s party.
    19 men from Battalion Headquarters. Second in Command’s party.
    8 men from Pioneer Section.
    127 men from ‘B’ Company.
    127 men with 127 Folding Bicycles from ‘D’ Company.
    1 man from Headquarters 7 Canadian Brigade. Padre.
    ‘C’ Company landed at H Hour under command of Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    Plus
    2 men and a handcart from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    3men from Forward Observation Officer, 13 Canadian Field SP Regiment RCA.
    3 men. Forward Observation Bombardment Officer. Forward Observation Bombardment party F66, RN.
    5 men from ‘A’ Company. Reconnaissance party. Cameron Highlanders of Ontario (MG)
    3 men for Traffic Control on the beach. 7 Canadian Reconnaissance Regiment

    2 men. Canadian Press Relations Services.
    19 men from 14 Canadian Field Ambulance. Assault Section.

    49 men with 4 handcarts from 85 Field Company RE.
    15 men with a handcart from1 Field Dressing Station. For Main Dressing Station.
    15 men with a handcart from 2 Field Dressing Station. For Main Dressing Station.
    14 men from ‘A’ Company, 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group. Reconnaissance party.
    2 man from Headquarters Company, 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group.
    16 men from 242 Provost Company. One section for control of the exits.

    Mike
     
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    Mike Beach.
    H+45 minutes.

    Inns of Court Regiment.

    The Unit Landing Officer had already landed at H+20 minutes to prepare for the landing of the squadron.

    Mike Green
    Serials 1104 and 1105 were two LCT IV specially allotted to the Inns of Court Regiment who were responsible for their tactical loading. These vehicles were to be given first priority through the exits. All vehicles were to fly a red and yellow flag to aid in their identification.

    *Serial 1104 is an LCTIV carrying
    7 Daimler Scout Cars.
    8 Daimler Armoured cars.
    6 M5 Halftracks.
    49 men.
    20 men from a Special Detachment RE. Carried in M5 Halftracks above.

    2 men with a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.
    Chespales to be loaded in this craft.

    *Serial 1105 is an LCTIV carrying.
    6 Daimler Scout Cars.
    2 Humber Scout Cars
    6 Daimler Armoured Cars.
    6 M5 Halftracks.
    1 Staghound Armoured Car.
    49 men.
    20 men from a Special Detachment RE. Carried in M5 Halftracks above.

    2 men with a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.
    Chespales to be loaded in this craft.


    Note: 5 Officers and 35 men from a Special Detachment RE. Carried in M5 Halftracks above. The personnel came from 73 Field Company.

    The squadron was formed into twelve half troops each of:
    1 Daimler Scout Car.
    1 Daimler Armoured Car.
    1 M5 Halftrack.

    These would leave a Squadron Headquarters of
    1 Staghound Armoured Car.
    1 Daimler Scout Car.
    2 Daimler Armoured Cars.
    2 Humber Scout Cars.
    One of these vehicles would be for the officer commanding RE detachment.

    It seems that only nine half troops carried engineers and explosives.

    1 Jeep with 2 crew followed at H+7 hours.


    3 Division orders also include information on the Inns of Court squadron as it was likely that it would operate partly in 3 Divisions area. Units were to be aware of the likelyhood of their presence and that the armoured cars would identify themselves by a yellow band round the turret, having the gun facing to the rear and by yellow smoke.


    The Plan.
    Once the enemy defences had been breached and there was a gap through the beach minefields the squadron would be ordered to advance. This order was to be given by the Commander of the right assault brigade. After passing through the assault brigade the force was to reach the River Orne as quickly as possible. Its tasks were:
    - To delay the advance of enemy reserve formations moving to the counter attack west of Caen.
    - To carry out general reconnaissance.

    The force was to prepare for demolition all road bridges over the River Orne from Thury Harcourt to St Andre sur Orne, and as a second priority all rail bridges. Priority was from south to north. All the bridges in the given area were to be blown rather than be allowed to fall into enemy hands intact.

    If the force failed to reach the R. Orne it should create an obstacle on the line of the R. Odon instead. The R. Odon did not present an obstacle to tanks so in addition to blowing bridges roads should be mined cratered and mines laid.

    Once the demolition belt on either line had been blown the squadron was to delay the enemy for as long as possible, gradually withdrawing and reporting enemy movement. A classic reconnaissance action! Finally the squadron would come into Corps reserve near Douvres.

    If possible the force would report on the strength, composition and direction of enemy movement.

    In the event that the line of the R Odon was not reached the task of the squadron was to report the strength, composition and direction of all enemy movement seen. Secondly it would use its engineers and explosives to the best advantage in the circumstances to delay the enemy.


    The Reality.
    The two LCTs landed as planned at 0830. One armoured car, three scout cars and two halftracks were knocked out on the beach or in the water. One LCT struck two mines in shallow water. This meant that vehicles could not land for six hours when the tide receded and the LCT was dried out. Because of a lack of exits and congestion on the beach permission was not given for the force to advance until 1030. It is known that the six troops crossed the R. Seulles from 1500 onwards but after that the only the movements are not clear. It seems that increasing opposition held them up and despite clear recognition signs one armoured car was destroyed by a British tank. The next officially recorded fact is that the headquarters harboured for the night in the area of Vienne en Bessin.

    On D+2 one half troop was attacked by US Thunderbolts at Jerusalem Crossroads. One halftrack carrying explosives blew up and destroyed other vehicles and buildings. There are photographs showing the scene.

    It seems that none of the objectives were reached and no bridges were blown. The squadron carried out a reconnaissance role before returning to 1 Corps headquarters. It was then reorganised and used as Phantom style contact detachments with 1 Corp units and as liaison with XXX Corps.

    Mike.
     
  17. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Mike Beach.
    H+45 minutes.

    ‘C’ Squadron, 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment.
    Three LCT IV carrying the wading vehicles of 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment. ‘A’ and ‘B’ Squadrons landed with DD tanks. Now ‘C’ Squadron and Regimental Headquarters land.
    Serials 1106, 1107 and 1108 are LCT IV carrying the wading vehicles of 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment. ‘A’ and ‘B’ Squadrons landed with DD tanks. Now ‘C’ Squadron and Regimental Headquarters land.


    *Serial 1106 is a LCT IV carrying
    ‘C’ Squadron, 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment.
    2 Sherman Vc Firefly.
    5 Sherman III.
    1 Stuart Light Tank.
    1 Valentine Bridge Layer (from 2 Canadian Armoured Brigade).
    2 Jeep.
    43 men.
    Porpoises to be loaded into this craft.
    Plus
    2 men and a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.


    *Serial 1107 is a LCT IV carrying
    ‘C’ Squadron, 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment.
    1 Sherman Vc Firefly.
    6 Sherman III.
    1 Stuart Light Tank.
    1 Valentine Bridge Layer (from 2 Canadian Armoured Brigade).
    40 men.
    Porpoises to be loaded into this craft.
    Plus
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from 4 Canadian Provost Company.
    1 Motorcycle with 1 crew from 4 Canadian Provost Company. Carried on Jeep above.
    1 Jeep with 3 crew from 6 Canadian Field Company
    1 man from Canadian Press Relations Services.
    2 men and a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.


    *Serial 1108 is a LCT IV carrying
    ‘C’ Squadron, 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment.
    2 Sherman Vc Firefly.
    6 Sherman III.
    1 Stuart Light Tank.
    2 Jeep.
    46 men.
    Porpoises to be loaded into this craft.
    Plus
    2 men and a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.

    Total vehicles, ‘C’ Squadron, 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment.
    5 Sherman Vc Firefly
    17 Sherman III
    3 Stuart Light tank
    2 Valentine Bridge Layer. From 2 Canadian Armoured Brigade.
    4 Jeep

    ‘C’ Squadron and Regimental Headquarters landed from LCTs at 8.20. At this time the exits were not open and the beaches were congested. A number of troops were despatched to deal with snipers and machine guns which were hindering work on the exits. When the exits were open Regimental Headquarters moved to its rally at Grayes sur Mer, losing the CO’s tank on the way. ‘C’ Squadron supported 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment in its advance towards Banville.

    Mike.
     
  18. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Mike Beach.
    7 Canadian Brigade Headquarters.
    *Serial 1109 is a Headquarters Ship. The following personnel will be ferried ashore by LCAs as required by the Brigade Commander.
    10 men from Headquarters 7 Canadian Brigade.
    5 men from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Divisional Signals.
    2 men from ‘E’ Section (12 Field Regiment), 3 Canadian Divisional Signals
    3 men from 3 Canadian Division Contact Detachment.
    3 men from RN Forward Observation Bombardment party F67
    4 men from 12 Canadian Field SP Regiment RCA. Artillery Group Command.
    2 men from Canadian Press Relation Services.


    Serials 1110, 1111 and 1112 are Motor Launches . They will transfer personnel from the Landing Ship Headquarters and take them close to shore where they will be landed by LCAs.
    *Serial 1110
    11 men from RN Beach Parties.
    3 men from RN 13 Beach Signals.

    *Serial 1111
    10 men from RN Beach Parties.
    3 men from RN 13 Beach Signals.

    *Serial 1112
    11 men from RN Beach Parties.
    4 men from 12 Canadian Field SP Regiment RCA. Forward Observation Officer.


    The LCAs were those which had landed assault troops in the first waves. While most LCAs returned to their ‘mother’ LSI and were hoisted aboard for the return trip to the UK a number were to be retained for ferry work off the beaches. Their place on LSIs was taken by returning LCA(HR).


    The Brigade Commander’s party landed about 0930 and moved to the Main Beach Signal Station. This had been operating for the past hour and would act as the headquarters communications centre until the Brigade Main Headquarters and its signals vehicles arrived. The Brigade Main Headquarters was established ashore at 1215 at Graye sur Mer.


    The following personnel and vehicles for 7 Canadian Brigade Headquarters were scheduled to land at H+75 minutes but were delayed and held up on the beaches. See below.
    9 men from Headquarters 7 Canadian Brigade.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Army Air Support Unit. Tentacle.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Headquarters 9 Infantry Brigade. Liaison Officer.
    2 men with a handcart from 3 Canadian Division Contact Detachment.

    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Headquarters 7 Canadian Brigade
    8 men with a James Motorcycle from Headquarters 7 Canadian Brigade.

    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Headquarters 8 Canadian Brigade. Liaison Officer.
    1 Jeep towing an airborne trailer with 1 crew from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    13 men with 2 handcarts from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    1 Jeep with 1 crew from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    1 M14 Halftrack with 1 crew from ‘J’ Section 3 Canadian Divisional Signals. Attached Brigade Headquarters.
    1 Motorcycle from ‘J’ Section 97 Brigade), 3 Canadian Divisional Signals. Carried in above halftrack.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from RN Forward Observation Bombardment party F67. Attached to Brigade Headquarters.

    Mike
     
  19. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Mike Beach.
    H+75 Minutes

    The Self Propelled Field Artillery lands.

    Canadian Self Propelled Field Artillery were equipped with M7 Priest 105mm self propelled guns. As on other beaches they were to fire on the approach and then wait offshore until the beaches were sufficiently clear to accept them. Each of the assaulting brigades had a Field Artillery Group of two regiments. 12 Canadian Field Artillery Regiment Group consisted of 12 and 13 Canadian Field Regiments and was to support 7 Canadian Brigade.

    Forward Observation Officers landed with the infantry assault brigades. Each assault battalion had five FOOs, plus a spare and a COs artillery representative. Reserve battalions in each assault brigade had one FOO and there was one at each assault brigade headquarters. There was also one Forward Officer Bombardment per Brigade Headquarters and one per infantry battalion.

    Each Field Artillery Regiment landed a reconnaissance party with the infantry and then landed the guns of 12 Canadian Field Regiment at H+75 minutes, and 13 Canadian Field Regiment at H+105 minutes.

    Royal Marine Armoured Support Batteries landed with the assault infantry at H Hour to give support on the beaches until the field artillery regiments landed. They would then be attached to the field artillery regiments.

    Until the end of Phase II, the capture of the intermediate objectives, the above organisation would remain ie:
    12 Canadian Field Artillery Regiment Group consisted of
    12 Canadian Field Regiment
    13 Canadian Field Regiment
    3 Battery, 2 Armoured Support Regiment RM.
    Four FOB Detachments, ‘A’ troop, 3 Bombardment Unit RN.
    Plus the assigned divisional anti tank and anti aircraft batteries.

    On landing 12 and 13 Canadian Field Regiments were to go to Gun Area Mary between Croix sur Mer and Banville. 3 Battery RM would remain deployed on Mike Green, Mike Red and Nan Green. 14 and 19 Canadian Field Regiments would go to Gun Area Jane astride the road Courseulles to Beny sur Mer. 4 Battery RM would remain deployed on Nan White and Nan Red.

    In Phase III the Field regiments would leap frog forward in support of the infantry. There would always be two batteries per regiment deployed for action at all times. The RM batteries were to deploy to the North of the gun areas and be ready to deploy in the forward areas to support infantry during the night.

    War Diaries for the artillery regiments and infantry battalions have little to say about the actions of the artillery on D Day. All regiments landed more or less on time and were delayed on the beach. They supported infantry from positions on or near the beach before moving inland later in the day.


    12 Canadian Field Regiment (SP). 14, 16 and 43 Batteries.
    13 Canadian Field Regiment (SP). 22, 44 and 78 Batteries.


    12 Canadian Field Regiment RCA.
    At H Hour two three man Forward Observation Officer teams landed with the assault companies. Available to land from LCS(M) as required and direct the fire of the Centaurs of the Royal Marine Support Regiment were two four man Forward Observation Bombardment teams.

    At H+20 two further three man Forward Observation Officer teams landed with the follow up companies. The Commanding Officer with two other personnel and a seven man reconnaissance party also landed.

    At H+45 two men from ‘F’ Section, 3 Canadian Division Signals landed to provide signals for the Commanding Officer.

    12 Canadian Field Regiment Landed at H+75 minutes. 13 Canadian Field Regiment landed at H+105 minutes.

    No artillery landed on Nan Green.






    Mike Green.
    12 Canadian Field SP Regiment.
    Four LCTV from 31 LCT Flotilla land carrying three troops of 12 Canadian Field Regiment RA plus a variety of other vehicles for 7 Canadian Brigade.

    *Serial 1113 is an LCT IV from 31 LCT Flotilla carrying ‘A’ Troop, 12 Canadian Field SP Regiment.
    2 Sherman OP
    4 M7 Priest 105mm SP .
    1 Carrier AOP.
    2 M14 Halftrack.
    1 Jeep.
    56 men.
    Each M7 Priest tows a Porpoise MkII and has 125 rounds of ammunition stowed loose on the LCT.
    Plus
    1 Carrier Universal with 2 crew from Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    2 Carrier with 4 crew from Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    1 Jeep with 4 crew from 18 Canadian Field Company RCE.
    8 men with a handcart from ‘A’ Company 8 Kings Regiment.


    *Serial 1114 is an LCT IV from 31 LCT Flotilla carrying ‘B’ Troop, 12 Canadian Field Regiment RCA.
    2 Sherman OP.
    4 M7 Priest 105mm SP.
    2 Carrier AOP.
    1 M14 Halftrack.
    1 3ton 4 X 4. Medical.
    55 men.
    Each M7 Priest tows a Porpoise MkII and has 125 rounds of ammunition stowed loose on the LCT.
    Plus
    2 Carrier Universal with 4 crew from Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    2 Carrier Mortar with 4 crew from Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    8men with 2 motorcycles from Royal Winnipeg Rifles.


    *Serial 1115 is an LCT IV from 31 LCT Flotilla carrying ‘C’ Troop, 12 Canadian Field Regiment RCA.
    2 Sherman OP.
    4 M7 Priest 105mm SP.
    1 Carrier AOP.
    2 M14 Halftrack.
    52 men.
    Each M7 Priest tows a Porpoise MkII and has 125 rounds of ammunition stowed loose on the LCT.
    1 Jeep with airborne trailer and 2 crew from ‘E’ Section (12 Field Regiment), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    Plus
    3 Carrier Mortar with 6 crew from Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    9 men from 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    3 Motorcycles and 3 crew from 4 Canadian Provost Company. Loaded onto carriers above.


    *Serial 1116 is an LCT IV from 31 LCT Flotilla carrying
    1 Churchill ARV with 6 crew from 22 Beach Recovery Section REME.
    1 M14 Halftrack with 2 crew from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Divisional Signals. Attached to 1 Canadian Scottish.
    1 Motorcycle from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Divisional Signals. Carried in above halftrack.
    1 Humber Scout Car with 2 crew from 6 Canadian Armoured Regiment.
    1 Jeep with 4 crew from 18 Canadian Field Company RCE.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from RN Forward Observation Bombardment party F66. Attached to 1 Canadian Scottish.
    1 Jeep and airborne trailer with 1 crew from 12 Canadian Field Company SP. Artillery Group Command.
    2 men from ‘E’ Section (12 Field Regiment), 3 Canadian Divisional Signals. Carried in Jeep above.
    1 Armoured D7 Angledozer towing a Jahn trailer with 3 crew from 59 Mechanical Equipment Section
    1 Armoured D7 Angledozer towing a flat bed trailer with 2 crew from 3 Canadian Field Park Company.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from RN Forward Observation Bombardment party F65. Attached to Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Army Air Support Unit. Tentacle.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Headquarters 69 Infantry Brigade. Liaison Officer.
    1 Carrier Universal with 2 crew from 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    1 Motorcycle from 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    1 Carrier Universal with 2 crew from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    1 Motorcycle with 1 crew from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    17 men with 3 handcarts from ‘J’ Section 97 Brigade), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    9 men from Headquarters 7 Canadian Brigade.
    2 men with a handcart from 3 Canadian Division Contact Detachment.
    2 men with a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.

    Note:
    This craft carries 1 Jeep and airborne trailer with 1 crew from 12 Canadian Field Regiment SP. Artillery Group Command. This vehicle carries 2 men from ‘E’ Section (12 Field Regiment), 3 Canadian Divisional Signals. These will be ashore and waiting for the Commanding Officer 12 Artillery Group (CO 12 Field Artillery Regiment) when he lands from 7 Canadian Brigades HQ ship.


    Mike Red.
    *Serial 1117 is an LCT IV from 31 LCT Flotilla carrying ‘D’ Troop, 12 Canadian Field Regiment RCA.
    2 Sherman OP.
    4 M7 Priest 105mm SP.
    2 Carrier AOP.
    1 M14 Halftrack.
    2 Jeep.
    54 men.
    Each M7 Priest tows a Porpoise MkII and has 125 rounds of ammunition stowed loose on the LCT.
    Plus
    2 Carrier with 4 crew from Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    2 Motorcycle with 2 crew from 4 Canadian Provost Company. Carried on above Carriers.
    1 Carrier Mortar with 2 crew from Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    4 men and a motorcycle from Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    8 men with a handcart from 242 Provost Company.
    2 men and a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.


    *Serial 1118 is an LCT IV from 31 LCT Flotilla carrying ‘E’ Troop, 12 Canadian Field Regiment RCA.
    2 Sherman OP.
    4 M7 Priest 105mm SP.
    1 Carrier AOP.
    2 M14 Halftrack.
    52 men.
    Each M7 Priest tows a Porpoise MkII and has 125 rounds of ammunition stowed loose on the LCT.
    1 M14 Halftrack with 7 crew from ’E’ Section (12 Field Regiment) 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    1 Jeep with 10cwt trailer and 2 crew from ’E’ Section (12 Field Regiment), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    Plus
    1 Jeep with a motorcycle and 2 crew from Headquarters 7 Canadian Brigade.
    2 men and a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.


    *Serial 1119 is an LCT IV from 31 LCT Flotilla carrying ‘F’ Troop, 12 Canadian Field Regiment RCA.
    2 Sherman OP.
    4 M7 Priest 105mm SP.
    1 Carrier AOP.
    1 M14 Halftrack.
    52 men.
    Each M7 Priest tows a Porpoise MkII and has 125 rounds of ammunition stowed loose on the LCT.
    1 M14 Halftrack with 7 crew from ’E’ Section (12 Field Regiment), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    Plus
    8 men and a handcart from ‘B’ Company 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group.
    2 men and a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.


    *Serial 1120 is an LCT IV from 31 LCT Flotilla carrying
    1 Churchill ARV and a Motorcycle with 7 crew from 22 Beach Recovery Section REME.
    1 Armoured D7 Angledozer towing a Jahn trailer with 3 crew from 59 Mechanical Equipment Section
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from RN Forward Observation Bombardment party F67. Attached to Brigade Headquarters.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Headquarters 8 Canadian Brigade. Liaison Officer.
    2 Jeeps and a Motorcycle with 4 crew from Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    1 Amphibious Jeep with 2 crew from RN Beach Party.
    1 Jeep towing an airborne trailer with 1 crew from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    13 men with 2 handcarts from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    1 Jeep with 1 crew from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    1 Carrier Mortar with 4 crew from Royal Winnipeg Rifles
    1 Carrier Universal with 2 crew from Royal Winnipeg Rifles
    1 Motorcycle from Royal Winnipeg Rifles. Carried on Carrier above.
    2 Carrier Mortar with 4 crew from 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    2 Jeeps and a motorcycle with 4 crew from 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    4 men and a motorcycle from 1 Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    1 M14 Halftrack with 1 crew from ‘J’ Section 3 Canadian Divisional Signals. Attached Brigade Headquarters.
    1 Motorcycle from ‘J’ Section (7 Brigade), 3 Canadian Divisional Signals. Carried in above halftrack.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Headquarters 7 Canadian Brigade
    8 men with a James Motorcycle from Headquarters 7 Canadian Brigade.
    2 men with a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.


    Junction of Mike Green and Mike Red.
    *Serial 1121 is an LCI(L) carrying personnel for work on the beaches.
    47 men from 6 Canadian Field Company RCE.
    54 men from 190 Company Pioneer Corps.
    49 men from 85 Field Company RE
    16 men from ‘A’ Company, 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group.
    16 men from ‘B’ Company, 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group.
    2 men and a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.


    Mike Green.
    *Serial 1123 is a Motor Launch carrying the following to be put ashore by LCA
    4 men from 13 Canadian Field SP Regiment. Forward Observation Officer.
    10 men from RN Beach Parties.


    The observation and reconnaissance parties of 12 Canadian Field Regiment landed with the infantry but suffered casualties including three officers wounded. The regiment landed around 0900 when the foreshore was very congested and the exits not yet open. The regiment came into action on the beach. The enemy were still very active and very close. The guns engaged targets over open sights and lost several men to sniper fire. The regiment eventually reached its gun area at 1700.

    Observation and reconnaissance parties landed with the assault infantry and had severe officer casualties including three killed and two wounded. The Commanding Officer landed at 0830 and the guns landed at around 0930.

    Mike.
     
  20. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Mike Beach
    H + 105 Minutes.

    13 Canadian Field SP Regiment RCA.
    Mike Green.
    *Serial 1124 is an LCT IV carrying ‘A’ Troop, 13 Canadian Field SP Regiment RCA.
    2 Sherman OP.
    4 M7 Priest 105mm SP.
    1 Carrier AOP.
    2 M14 Halftrack.
    1 Jeep.
    56 men.
    Space for extra ammunition. Porpoises to be loaded in this craft.
    Plus
    1 Jeep with 4 crew from 242 Provost Company.
    2 Jeeps with 8 crew from Pioneer Platoon 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group.
    3 men from Pioneer Platoon 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group

    *Serial 1125 is an LCT IV carrying ‘B’ Troop, 13 Canadian Field SP Regiment RCA.
    2 Sherman OP.
    4 M7 Priest 105mm SP.
    2 Carrier AOP.
    1 M14 Halftrack.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 Medical.
    55 men.
    Space for extra ammunition. Porpoises to be loaded in this craft.
    Plus
    2 Carrier Mortar with 4 crew from Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    8 men and 2 motorcycles Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    1 Carrier Loyd with 4 crew from Headquarters 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Group. Intelligence Officer’s party.
    Note: The Loyd Carrier may have been replaced by a Weasel.

    *Serial 1126 is an LCT IV carrying ‘C’ Troop, 13 Canadian Field SP Regiment RCA.

    2 Sherman OP.
    4 M7 Priest 105mm SP.
    1 Carrier AOP.
    2 M14 Halftrack.
    52 men.
    Space for extra ammunition. Porpoises to be loaded in this craft.
    1 Jeep with airborne trailer and 3 crew from ‘F’ Section (13 Field Regiment), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    Plus
    1 Carrier Universal with 2 crew from Canadian Scottish Regiment.
    1 Motorcycles and 1 crew from 4 Canadian Provost Company. Loaded onto carrier above.
    1 Jeep with airborne trailer and 4 crew from 242 Provost Company. Officer Commanding.


    *Serial 1127 is an LCT IV carrying
    1 Churchill ARV and a Motorcycle with 6 crew from 22 Beach Recovery Section REME.
    1 Armoured D7 Angledozer towing a Jahn trailer with 3 crew from 59 Mechanical Equipment Section RE.
    1 Amphibious Jeep with 3 crew from 21 Army Group Movement Control. Military Landing Officer.
    1 Jeep Ambulance towing an airborne trailer with 3 crew from 2 Field Dressing Station. Senior Medical Officer.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Headquarters 7 Canadian Brigade.
    2 Carrier Universal towing 6pdr AT guns with 4 crew from Royal Winnipeg Rifles
    1 15cwt GS 4 X 4 with 2 crew from Royal Winnipeg Rifles
    10 men and 1 Motorcycle from Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
    1 Bulldozer D4 towing a flat bed trailer with 2 crew from 3 Canadian Field Park Company.
    1 Carrier (L) with 4 crew from Headquarters 8 Kings Regiment. 7 Beach Group Command. For reconnaissance.
    1 man from Signal Platoon 8 Kings Regiment. In carrier above.
    1 M14 Halftrack with 3 crew from 85 Field Company RE. Officer Commanding.
    1 15cwt GS and I Motorcycle with 4 crew from 242 Provost Company.
    2 men with one balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.


    *Serial 1128 is an LCT IV carrying ‘D’ Troop, 13 Canadian Field SP Regiment.
    2 Sherman OP.
    4 M7 Priest 105mm SP.
    2 Carrier AOP.
    1 M14 Halftrack.
    2 Jeep.
    54 men.
    Space for extra ammunition. Porpoises to be loaded in this craft.
    Plus
    1 Jeep and 1 Motorcycle with 2 crew from 4 Canadian Provost Company.
    2 Jeeps with 3 crew from 3 Canadian Division Contact Detachment.
    2 Motorcycle with 2 crew from 4 Canadian Provost Company. Carried on above Jeeps
    2 men and a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.


    *Serial 1129 is an LCT IV carrying ‘E’ Troop, 13 Canadian Field SP Regiment.
    3 Sherman OP.
    4 M7 Priest 105mm SP.
    1 Carrier AOP.
    2 M14 Halftrack.
    59 men.
    Space for extra ammunition. Porpoises to be loaded in this craft.
    1 M14 Halftrack with 7 crew from ’F’ Section (13 Canadian Field Regiment), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    1 Jeep with 10cwt trailer and 2 crew from ’F’ Section (13 Canadian Field Regiment), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    1 man from Headquarters RCA, 3 Canadian Division. Padre for 13 Canadian Field Regiment.
    Plus
    1 Jeep with an airborne Trailer and 2 crew from ‘J’ Section (7 Canadian Brigade), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    2 men and a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.


    *Serial 1130 is an LCT IV carrying ‘F’ Troop, 13 Canadian Field SP Regiment.
    1 Sherman OP.
    4 M7 Priest 105mm SP.
    2 Carrier AOP.
    1 M14 Halftrack.
    52 men.
    Space for extra ammunition. Porpoises to be loaded in this craft.
    1 M14 Halftrack with 7 crew from ’F’ Section (13 Canadian Field SP Regiment), 3 Canadian Division Signals.
    Plus
    8 men and a handcart from 242 Provost Company.
    2 men and a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.


    *Serial 1131 is an LCI(L) carrying
    54 men from 190 Pioneer Company
    19 men from ‘A’ Company 8 Kings Regiment
    19 men from ‘B’ Company 8 Kings Regiment
    27 men from 293 Pioneer Company (Medical). For 1 Field Dressing Station (MDS).
    27 men from 293 Pioneer Company (Medical). For 2 Field Dressing Station (MDS).
    2 men from Headquarters 7 Canadian Brigade.
    22 men from 7 Canadian Brigade Defence Platoon.
    7 men from 103 RAF Beach Section. Liaison Officers party.
    3 men from 8 Kings Regiment. Beach Party. Medical Officer and party for 2 Field Dressing Station.
    2 men from 21Army Group Movement Control. Military Landing Officer’s staff.
    1 man from 114 LAA Regiment RA. Medical Officer for 1 Field Dressing Station.
    2 men and a balloon from 51 RAF Balloon Unit.

    Mike.
     

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