Jam and the WI during the Second World War

Discussion in 'United Kingdom' started by CL1, Oct 10, 2018.

  1. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    In the autumn of 1939 Lady Denman had promised the WIs news of the important part that they were to play in the production and preservation of the country's food.

    With up to two thirds of Britain's food being imported, the government realised that they had to find ways of producing more food at home. Bottling and preserving surplus fruit and vegetables was something that countrywomen had always done. NFWI already gave considerable emphasis to practical cookery and there were trained Instructresses of Home Economy already at work in the Federations. In the early part of 1938 the Ministry of Agriculture had given NFWI an initial grant of £500 to set up a Produce Guild to teach members about intensive cultivation and to supply fertilisers and plants more cheaply
    The grant allowed an Organiser to be employed to travel round the country running courses and giving advice. WI members were ready not only to grow more produce but also to start the co-operative enterprises for which they are probably best known – jam making, bottling and canning. The grant from the Ministry was increased, and by 1944 NFWI received £2,100 for national work and £4,000 for work in the County Federations.

    The Government grant allowed NFWI to buy £1,400 worth of sugar in 1940 and distribute it round the Federations who in turn issued it to those WIs prepared to take part in the Co-operative Fruit Preservation Scheme. As a result 1,631 tons of preserves were made that year. Federations bought canning machines to loan to Institutes, and the Americans, through the Associated Countrywomen of the World, sent 500 Dixie Hand sealers (home canners) along with a complete Food Preservation Unit and oil stoves, preserving pans, tea towels, thermometers, jam jars, bottling jars, jam pot covers and special discs for pickles and chutneys.



    National Federation of Women's Institutes | Jam and the WI during the Second World War
     
  2. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    Might have to have one of these for inside my bunker

    TD
     
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  3. Roy Martin

    Roy Martin Senior Member

    Not just jam and Jerusalem, two pages about the Weymouth WI during and after Dunkirk. I hope it reads OK McAfee won't let me look! Another page tomorrow.
    Roy
     

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  4. Roy Martin

    Roy Martin Senior Member

    Page 3. I have a couple of other accounts of the sterling service of other women's groups in the aftermath of Dunkirk
     

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  5. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    Wonder if Drew would be interested as its May 1940

    TD

    Theres details in there that dont appear in most books or even modern films - perhaps they will make a film about it and use a young musical star from a group called Two Directions ??
     
  6. Roy Martin

    Roy Martin Senior Member

    Thanks for your like TD. Here is another one from Weymouth June 1940
     

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  7. Roy Martin

    Roy Martin Senior Member

    This time the Red Cross:

    On 21 June 1940 Falmouth harbour was crowded with ships, most of which had rescued troops and civilians from western France. A tramp steamer called Broompark brought in scientists and their families, plus all the heavy water that then existed and gem diamonds that were then worth about £2,5 million. The cargo and the passengers were taken to London by an overnight special train. The diamonds went to the vaults of the Diamond Corporation and most of the heavy water was hidden under Windsor Castle, alongside the Crown Jewels.

    'On the train Golding and Nicolle managed to get a compartment to themselves. The Timbal family were in another where they laid the children down on the seats:

    Just then (it was almost midnight), we had our first taste of the kindness of a great people; Ladies of the British Red Cross (I had no idea who warned them, or who had even thought of warning them) went from one compartment to the other with hot tea and pieces of delicious freshly made cake. What a luxury after the stale bread we had eaten for the last five days. We even received some warm milk for the children. My wife and the nurse could not restrain their tears. I also saw tears in the eyes of the Red Cross volunteer, a very kind and distinguished looking lady with white hair, who was helping us. We were far from the Germans. That cup of tea and piece of cake had comforted us morally as well as physically.'

    This was the first such rescue witnessed by Lieutenant Ian Fleming RNVR - seems to have given him an idea!
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018
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  8. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    Ha - I knew I had reaad that passage somewhere before - it rattled a few bells

    Its just interesting to read this side of Dunkirk/Ariel etc

    TD
     

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