I don't really know what to say.

Discussion in 'The War at Sea' started by OpanaPointer, Mar 20, 2013.

  1. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer Pearl Harbor Myth Buster

    The whole flotilla was being knocked up.
    (Sept. 30, 1941, at Pearl Harbor, T. H.)

    :D
     
  2. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    OpanaPointer
    It's only the difference of both the British and Americans using the common language of English - my late wife once "knocked up " the parish priest to ask him something - to the hilarity of our Canadian friends when she recounted the tale - as was said that the Americans were overpaid - oversexed - and over here....

    Cheers
     
  3. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    When I worked as a medical receptionist at a US Navy clinic based within a RAF Station, a patient came into make an appointment.

    It was the policy to ask the patient to describe their symptoms to make sure they got adequate time with the doctor. This woman said she was feeling "raunchy"! I don't know what my face was saying, but in my head I was just thinking if she is feeling horny, what's she doing here at a clinic?

    On further questioning I managed to gather in the U.S. it means you feel bit under the weather or run down as she described it. It's amazing how words get twisted around.
     
  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer Pearl Harbor Myth Buster

    I just wonder if he knew the Merkin usage of that phrase when he uttered it before over 100 USN sailors. Somehow I doubt it.
     
  5. urqh

    urqh Senior Member

    And my favourite pi..ed

    Apparantly there are an awful lot of Americans with a drink problem as everytime I read a post on ww2f someone is saying they are pi..ed
     
  6. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer Pearl Harbor Myth Buster

    And my favourite pi..ed

    Apparantly there are an awful lot of Americans with a drink problem as everytime I read a post on ww2f someone is saying they are pi..ed

    Better to be pi..ed off than pi..ed on. :p
     
  7. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    being knocked up
    so when did that enter UK English usuage as I know it now.
    ie. getting pregnant.
     
  8. Rich Payne

    Rich Payne Rivet Counter 1940 Obsessive

    so when did that enter UK English usuage as I know it now.
    ie. getting pregnant.

    ...Since I left Blighty, I think.
     
  9. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    ...Since I left Blighty, I think.

    You must have been out of the country along time then cos I remember saying that back in 80s.
     
    von Poop likes this.
  10. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    so when did that enter UK English usuage as I know it now.
    ie. getting pregnant.

    I have a Scottish friend, who's accent after 35 years in Canada, remains as thick as ever, always refers to it as " falling pregnant". Like it was a disease.

    Then again, it could be describing something she fell on which brought about that condition.:D
     
    Dave55 likes this.
  11. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Maybe it was 'shacked up' rather than 'knocked up'.
    Getting old now, memory going.
    Anyway ''getting knocked up'' only means 1 thing to me.
     
  12. kopite

    kopite Member

    Reminds me of the first time I met my father-in-law over here in the States. We were all sitting down having a cup of tea and with his wife sitting next to him he proceeded to tell me how hard she had been working in the garden that day. He then loudly proclaimed that she had "worked her fanny off" which took me by surprise, being the only non-American in the room. When I later spoke to my wife about it she was highly amused after I explained what the meaning of the word is in the UK. In the US it is a different part of the anatomy and can be either male or female, but the meaning over here is completely innocuous.
     
  13. Rich Payne

    Rich Payne Rivet Counter 1940 Obsessive

    You must have been out of the country along time then cos I remember saying that back in 80s.

    You were probably saying a lot of things that I didn't, back in the 1980s, like "Where did oi park moi combine 'arvester' and "oo drunk moi cider...?":p
     
  14. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Playing pool in bar in Gastown , Vancouver 1991, a girl* came up to me & said,
    ''Gee, I like your hat , it's gnarly.''

    ''er...wot does that mean ?'' says I.

    I know now.
    Never heard it before.


    * & before anyone says something, no she was with her boyfriend & she was already knocked up.Several months gone too.
     
  15. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    Playing pool in bar in Gastown , Vancouver 1991, a girl* came up to me & said,
    ''Gee, I like your hat , it's gnarly.''

    ''er...wot does that mean ?'' says I.

    I know now.
    Never heard it before.


    * & before anyone says something, no she was with her boyfriend & she was already knocked up.Several months gone too.

    The horse had already left the barn, so to speak. So, did you get propositioned by any non-pregnant women during your Canadian stay Owen?:D
     
  16. David Layne

    David Layne Well-Known Member

    You must have been out of the country along time then cos I remember saying that back in 80s.

    I remember using that expression circa 1967 when I told a young girl friend (in front of her parents) "I will knock you up in the morning."

    I did and didn't so to speak.
     
  17. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer Pearl Harbor Myth Buster

    Linguistic shift is fun for a historian. I read a letter once, from a USN commodore to his family, dated 1813. It ended with "I am glad to hear you are all still gay, and hope you remain so."

    So much for grandkids.
     
  18. urqh

    urqh Senior Member

    Lets hear it for the Gay Gordons.....pip pip...
     
  19. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    'Ring him up' means to strike out a batter in baseball in America.
     
  20. Margaret Ann

    Margaret Ann Junior Member

    You do realise that they mean they are annoyed, not drunk.
     

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