Hitler's Biggest Mistake

Discussion in 'General' started by paulyb102, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. paulyb102

    paulyb102 Member

    I personally think that Hitler,s biggest gaffe, was the decision to go into Russia without first making sure of Britain, but for this decision, he could have come very close to his dream of a 1,000 year reich.

    paulyb102 :D :) :D Good for us all, that he made countless errors!
     
  2. plant-pilot

    plant-pilot Senior Member

    Surely his biggest mistake was the one of not following the advice given by his generals. He repeatedly, and near the end constantly, countermanded the advice given by experienced men on tactical and stratigic advice

    Just because you are the boss doesn't mean that you know better than your advisors. It does however mean that you take the can for any mistakes if you ignore their advice.
     
  3. cha0s_mak3r

    cha0s_mak3r Junior Member

    1. if he finished britan off he would have won
    2. if he hadnt attacked russia 2 soon
    3.if he didnt spend the remainder of the war concentrating on killing the jews
     
  4. Kiwiwriter

    Kiwiwriter Very Senior Member

    Hitler made so many errors, it's hard to know where to start. However, Ronald Lewin's "Hitler's Mistakes" analyzes the whole pile, from the alleged Nazi philosophy to the "stand-fast" orders of 1944 and 1945. It includes creating a national culture based on hypocrisy, lies, and kleptomania, the anti-Semitism, the structureless state, the culture of procurement, and the flawed military strategies, which ranged from planning to fight a series of short wars to the Battle of the Bulge.
     
  5. Friedrich H

    Friedrich H Senior Member

    Being born, in the first place, I'd say…

    But it would have to be the decision to invade the Soviet Union and then declaring war upon the United States.

    Surely his biggest mistake was the one of not following the advice given by his generals. He repeatedly, and near the end constantly, countermanded the advice given by experienced men on tactical and stratigic advice

    Just because you are the boss doesn't mean that you know better than your advisors. It does however mean that you take the can for any mistakes if you ignore their advice.

    This has many things of a myth, actually. All this thinking was created by Sir Basil Lidell-Hart in the 1950s by interviewing many German high-ranking generals who blamed all their failures on the mad Bohemian corporal.

    The truth is different, nonetheless. Hitler never took decision unadvised and sudden decisions (on the contrary, he delayed decisions on critical affairs till they reached moements of utter crisis!). As War Lord, Hitler was not the military genious he himself thught he was, but he was not the incompetent maniac many believe he was. He actually had a very wide (perhaps too wide) strategic view of things and a very sharp tactical sense.

    Hitler practically invented the glidder airborne concept, he came up with the idea of the lighning attack on Norway, he supported innovative generals such as Manstein and Guderian in 1940 against all odds, he saved the Wehrmacht in 1941 and again in 1943.

    But, of course, his mistakes had far deeper consequences and his defeats were much greater than all these successes.
     
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  6. Gerard

    Gerard Seelow/Prora

    His biggest mistake was declaring war on the United States. His belief that he was allying with a country that had never been defeated in war (Japan) was utterly staggering. The second was invading Russia in 1941. He went a year too early. Imagine diverting some of those resources to clearing the Med. The North African theater would have been a completely different affair with even 2 or 3 extra divisions and 1 extra luftflotte to safeguard the supply routes.

    For all that, thank god he made those mistakes :)
     
  7. nolanbuc

    nolanbuc Senior Member

    Excellent point, Prefab. But wasn't he more or less bound to declare war on the US by the Tripartate Pact once the US declared war on Japan? I've always assumed this, but I've never really substantiated it. :unsure:
     
  8. Gerard

    Gerard Seelow/Prora

    Originally posted by nolanbuc@Feb 17 2005, 12:29 PM
    Excellent point, Prefab. But wasn't he more or less bound to declare war on the US by the Tripartate Pact once the US declared war on Japan? I've always assumed this, but I've never really substantiated it. :unsure:
    [post=31609]Quoted post[/post]
    I dont believe the Tripartite act bound that to happen, otherwise the Japanese would have been compelled to declare war on Russia at the same time which we know they didnt do!
     
  9. Kiwiwriter

    Kiwiwriter Very Senior Member

    Originally posted by nolanbuc@Feb 17 2005, 08:29 AM
    Excellent point, Prefab. But wasn't he more or less bound to declare war on the US by the Tripartate Pact once the US declared war on Japan? I've always assumed this, but I've never really substantiated it. :unsure:
    [post=31609]Quoted post[/post]
    I'm not sure, either, and I'll find out.
     
  10. zander

    zander Junior Member

    His biggest mistake(my opinion) was that he understimated the UK.
    In reality,Winston Churchil was a very clever man in ww2,and his thought was like Hitler's.He could guess,Hitlers next move.
    Thats why UK gave made him pr.minister and made previous pr.minister Chumberline(?) to leave.The last one was with peace ,unlike Churchill that was with war.
     
  11. HEKE

    HEKE Member

    I think that Hitler made two major mistakes. He underestimated Englands strenght (actually he underestimated almost every countries strenght) and he attacked Soviet-Union too soon.
     
  12. Charybdis

    Charybdis Junior Member

    His mistakes were many. Among the most serious was that he listened to a central coterie of sycophants that massaged his ego and persuaded him that things could be done when patently they could not. Afraid of losing their positions of favour they cajoled him more than once into thinking that the advice of non party Generals was a plot to destabalise the party and remove him from power.
     
  13. Egorov

    Egorov Junior Member

    Hello,
    In my opinion, I think that the errors of Hitler must maybe taken in a chronological way... I explain (or I try).
    In my opinion, the first error dates back to Dunkirk where they leave the British troops escape from France ( without heavy equipment ) while stopping the armored panzers , and lets the Luftwaffe finish the work. Result: the german aviation does not succeed.
    At this moment it is too late to hope to invade England immediately.
    After, the luftwaffe can't destroy the RAF.

    Hitler attacks the Soviet union --- > therefore 2 foreheads..... > so on.

    Every mistake leads to another mistake, this becomes the " snow ball effect."
     
  14. Juanra

    Juanra Junior Member

    BBC says that the errors were that hitler believed the red army was primitive, bombing wasn't a serious threat, and that the US was unable to field an army.
     
  15. Hidden_Sniper

    Hidden_Sniper Junior Member

    Also, he did not heed to the advice that his generals gave him.
     
  16. Friedrich H

    Friedrich H Senior Member

    Also, he did not heed to the advice that his generals gave him.

    He did. Read above. ;)
     
  17. Juanra

    Juanra Junior Member

    Also, Hitler declared war on US when he didn't have to.
     
  18. halfyank

    halfyank Member

    Originally posted by nolanbuc@Feb 17 2005, 06:29 AM
    Excellent point, Prefab. But wasn't he more or less bound to declare war on the US by the Tripartate Pact once the US declared war on Japan? I've always assumed this, but I've never really substantiated it. :unsure:
    [post=31609]Quoted post[/post]

    Actually the Tripartate Pact, or Tripartite, only compels Germany to come to Japan's aid, or vice versa, if Japan was attacked. It didn't say anything about Japan attacking somebody else. Also Hitler broke many treaty's why would he keep this one if he didn't want to? The treaty also specifically excludes the Soviet Union, so Japan was not bound to declare war on the Soviets.

    No, I think Hitler's two biggest mistakes were attacking the Soviet Union, and declaring war on the US. I don't know what would have happened if he hadn't done either of those, but once he did both he was pretty much doomed.
     
  19. Gerard

    Gerard Seelow/Prora

    Originally posted by halfyank+May 4 2005, 10:47 PM-->(halfyank @ May 4 2005, 10:47 PM)</div><div class='quotemain'><!--QuoteBegin-nolanbuc@Feb 17 2005, 06:29 AM
    Excellent point, Prefab.  But wasn't he more or less bound to declare war on the US by the Tripartate Pact once the US declared war on Japan?  I've always assumed this, but I've never really substantiated it. :unsure:
    [post=31609]Quoted post[/post]

    Actually the Tripartate Pact, or Tripartite, only compels Germany to come to Japan's aid, or vice versa, if Japan was attacked. It didn't say anything about Japan attacking somebody else. Also Hitler broke many treaty's why would he keep this one if he didn't want to? The treaty also specifically excludes the Soviet Union, so Japan was not bound to declare war on the Soviets.

    No, I think Hitler's two biggest mistakes were attacking the Soviet Union, and declaring war on the US. I don't know what would have happened if he hadn't done either of those, but once he did both he was pretty much doomed.
    [post=33994]Quoted post[/post]
    [/b]Declaring war on the US was incredibly stupid especially when he didnt have to.
     
  20. crussell

    crussell Junior Member

    One of Hitler's so called biggest mistakes to decide not to invade Britain in 1940 seems rather to have been one of his smartest decisions judging by the total annihilation of the German amphibious assault on Crete in 1941 by the Royal Navy despite the total control of the skies over Crete by the Luftwaffe.
     

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