German Home Front

Discussion in 'Germany' started by Danmark, May 20, 2004.

  1. HUBSCHRAUBER

    HUBSCHRAUBER Junior Member

    before world war 2 my oma was living in yugoslavia. she was just a little girl. she and here family were from germany and lived in a german community but have lived there for quite some time. they had a vineyard and a cabin. when war broke out against germany and the allies(not yugoslavia yet) her family would go to there cabin up in the mountains but when they went there there were germans hung on trees with there tounges cut out. they never came back, because the partisans would do this to them.when germany went to war with yugoslavia , they sent trains to these german communites and told all the germans to get in. they did not know where they were going but they went, for if they didn't they surely would have been killed. in this way hitler saved many peoples lives. he cared for the german people.
    i will finish the story another day, for it is late here and i want to get some sleep
     
  2. angie999

    angie999 Very Senior Member

    Originally posted by HUBSCHRAUBER@May 26 2005, 03:50 AM
    when war broke out against germany [post=34797]Quoted post[/post]

    War didn't just break out like a swarm of bees. The Germans invaded Yugoslavia in the wake of the Italian attempt at an invasion. They could have stayed at home instead.

    Hitler's attitudes in 1945 showed very clearly that he did not care particularly for the Germans once they failed to live up to his fantasies. And many ethnic Germans who were "returned" (very few had ever been there of course) to the Reich, expecting it to be Germany, ended up in those parts of Poland annexed directly into the Reich (Wartegau and West Prussia) - they were not amused!
     
  3. Gerard

    Gerard Seelow/Prora

    Following the end of the war, over a million ethnic Germans were "moved" from parts of Poland and Czechoslovakia west into Germany. The Potsdam Conference described that this should be an orderly withdrawal however it was far from this. Many were killed and uprooted forcefully by people who had been repressed under the previous regime. Poland ended up extending its borders to include Prussia and Pomerania forcing millions onto the road.
     
  4. laufer

    laufer Senior Member

    Originally posted by Gotthard Heinrici@Jul 25 2005, 04:18 PM
    Following the end of the war, over a million ethnic Germans were "moved" from parts of Poland and Czechoslovakia west into Germany. The Potsdam Conference described that this should be an orderly withdrawal however it was far from this. Many were killed and uprooted forcefully by people who had been repressed under the previous regime. Poland ended up extending its borders to include Prussia and Pomerania forcing millions onto the road.
    [post=36865]Quoted post[/post]

    General,
    I'm afraid we couldn't extend anything in those hard times B)
     
  5. Gerard

    Gerard Seelow/Prora

    Indeed Laufer they were very hard times for Poland. It is a testimony to the Polish spirit that throughout history no matter how many times other nations have tried to destroy them, the Polish nation has survived and flourished.
     
  6. later

    later Junior Member

    who was ferdinand schorner?
     
  7. morse1001

    morse1001 Very Senior Member

    Originally posted by later@Aug 9 2005, 11:21 AM
    who was ferdinand schorner?
    [post=37461]Quoted post[/post]

    SChorner

    Try this
     
  8. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER

    Originally posted by later@Aug 9 2005, 09:21 PM
    who was ferdinand schorner?
    [post=37461]Quoted post[/post]

    Generalfeldmarschall Ferdinand Schorner was the last Commander in Chief of the German army.......30 Apr 1945 - 8 May 1945 succeeding Adolf Hitler and previously commander of Army Group Centre and numerous other commands.

    He died in Munich on February 7 1973 at the age of 80.

    He survived 10 years in one of Stalin's prison camps and yet another 4 1/2 years in a West German prison on a manslaughter conviction.
     
  9. Harry Ree

    Harry Ree Very Senior Member

    Generalfeldmarschall Ferdinand Schorner was the last Commander in Chief of the German army.......30 Apr 1945 - 8 May 1945 succeeding Adolf Hitler and previously commander of Army Group Centre and numerous other commands.

    He died in Munich on February 7 1973 at the age of 80.

    He survived 10 years in one of Stalin's prison camps and yet another 4 1/2 years in a West German prison on a manslaughter conviction.


    Absolutely true.Schorner was a fearless Nazi who in the late hour, motivated by promotion to Field Marshal as one of Hitler's favourites,thought he could save the Third Reich from the Red Army.

    He was infamous for his illegal drumhead courts martial on the Eastern Front where ever he commanded, which slaughtered thousands of young Wehrmacht soldiers in harsh measures to maintain morale as the German armies crumbled.He himself was not in the end, so fearless,he donned civilian clothing and flew to Austria and surrendered to the Americans thinking that it would save him from the Russians.He was lucky to get away with losing 10 years of his liberty in a Russian POW camp.Released in April 1955,The German Association of Returned Prisoners of War charged him with his illegal drumhead acts of field discipline on the Eastern Front.He went to jail in 1957 for 4 years,6 months after being successfully prosecuted for manslaughter in one specimen case of being found guilty of ordering the execution of a Wehrmacht corporal without trial who had been found drunk in charge of a Wehrmacht vehicle.

    Schoerner was described as one of the leading National Socialist Leadership Staff of the Wehrmacht and I cannot see any reference to him being criticised at any time by Hitler despite him being recorded as a member of the Goverment forces as a junior officer in suppressing the Munich Beer Hall Putch.He went on to become a Hitler favourite throughout the life of the regime and was in Hitler's plans to the end.He was one of those who received command of nonexistent army groups in Hitler's imagination direct from the Fuhrer Bunker.
     
  10. BarbaraHistory

    BarbaraHistory Junior Member

    Following the end of the war, over a million ethnic Germans were "moved" from parts of Poland and Czechoslovakia west into Germany. The Potsdam Conference described that this should be an orderly withdrawal however it was far from this. Many were killed and uprooted forcefully by people who had been repressed under the previous regime. Poland ended up extending its borders to include Prussia and Pomerania forcing millions onto the road.
    Your numbers are not O.K. there were about 15 millions of Germans or ethnic Germans from the German parts Silesia, Brandenburg, East Prussia, Pommern, from Poland, from Czechoslovakia, from Hungary and from Roumania. 2 millions died on their way to Germany. They were mostly women, their children and old men. The younger men were either dead, caught in concentration camps or already on their way to Russia for reparation. It was an ethnic purge,in the eastern part of Europe there was ethnic purge, in the western part there was political purge . These refugees and expellees were a heavy burden in postwar Germany, as far as housing in the destroyed towns and food was concerned. Later they showed to be a blessing in disguise, as they were very industrious people, who hated to live from social welfare and did their very best to get independent from the state. It' s due to them that Germany could recover from war so quickly. The other Germans had to pay Soforthilfe and Lastenausgleich. This was meant to share the burden of the lost war, because such people had lost everything, and the few things which they took along with them, was often robbed by the hostile expellers. So it has not only been due to the marshal plan, which had to be paid back, but also to the united efforts,that Germany recovered quickly.
     

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