Flight Lieutenant MAURICE CECIL STIMPSON D F C

Discussion in 'War Grave Photographs' started by CL1, May 14, 2011.

  1. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    STIMPSON, MAURICE CECIL

    Rank:
    Flight Lieutenant
    Service No:
    155249
    Date of Death:
    15/02/1944
    Age:
    22
    Regiment/Service:
    Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

    156 Sqdn.
    Awards:
    D F C
    Panel Reference
    Panel 203.
    Memorial
    RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
    Additional Information:
    Son of Harry and Nellie Louisa Stimpson, of Headstone Lane, Harrow, Middlesex.

    156 Squadron RAF
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Peter Clare

    Peter Clare Very Senior Member

    Flight Lieutenant MAURICE CECIL STIMPSON
    D F C

    155249, 156 Sqdn., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
    who died age 22
    on 15 February 1944
    Son of Harry and Nellie Louisa Stimpson, of Headstone Lane, Hertfordshire.
    Remembered with honour
    RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL

    156 Squadron RAF

    Details of the above loss. Taken from Bomber Command Losses. Vol.5 - W R. Chorley.......

    15-16 February 1944

    156 Squadron
    Lancaster III ND504 GT-
    Op. Berlin

    The aircraft took off from Warboys at 1711 hrs and was lost without trace.
    All are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial. F/S. Gurton's DFM was not published until 21 December 1945.

    Crew

    F/L. M C. Stimpson DFC +
    F/S. W J. Catchpole +
    P/O. H N. Jackson DFC RCAF +
    F/S. J L. Gurton DFM +
    F/O. J H. Wright DFC +
    F/S. W H. Smith +
    F/S. T R. Dutton +

    .............................

    The Berlin raid of 15/16 February 1944

    After a rest of more than 2 weeks for the regular bomber squadrons, 891 aircraft - 561 Lancasters, 314 Halifaxes, 16 Mosquitos - were dispatched to Berlin. This was the largest force sent to Berlin and the largest non-1,000 bomber force sent to any target, exceeding the previous record of 826 aircraft (which included Stirlings and Wellingtons) sent to Dortmund on the night of 23/24 May 1943. It was also the first time that more than 500 Lancasters and more than 300 Halifaxes were dispatched. The German controllers were able to plot the bomber stream soon after it left the English coast but the swing north over Denmark for the approach flight proved too far distant for many of the German fighters. The German controller ordered the fighters not to fly over Berlin, leaving the target area free for the flak, but many fighters ignored him and attacked bombers over the city. The diversion to Frankfurt-on-Oder failed to draw any fighters. 43 aircraft - 26 Lancasters, 17 Halifaxes -were lost, 4.8 per cent of the force.
    Berlin was covered by cloud for most of the raid. Heavy bombing fell on the centre and south-western districts and some of Berlin's most important war industries were hit, including the large Siemensstadt area. This was really the end of the true 'Battle of Berlin'; only one more raid took place on the city in this period and that was not for more than a month.


    'The Bomber Command War Diaries' - M. Middlebrook / C. Everitt.
     
  3. Okey

    Okey Junior Member

    Do you have any info re the crew other than that below . My cousin-- John Gurton was a member . I do have a photograph of the crew and have provided it to 156 Sqn web site

    Okey

    QUOTE=Peter Clare;394804]Details of the above loss. Taken from Bomber Command Losses. Vol.5 - W R. Chorley.......

    15-16 February 1944

    156 Squadron
    Lancaster III ND504 GT-
    Op. Berlin

    The aircraft took off from Warboys at 1711 hrs and was lost without trace.
    All are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial. F/S. Gurton's DFM was not published until 21 December 1945.

    Crew

    F/L. M C. Stimpson DFC +
    F/S. W J. Catchpole +
    P/O. H N. Jackson DFC RCAF +
    F/S. J L. Gurton DFM +
    F/O. J H. Wright DFC +
    F/S. W H. Smith +
    F/S. T R. Dutton +

    .............................

    The Berlin raid of 15/16 February 1944

    After a rest of more than 2 weeks for the regular bomber squadrons, 891 aircraft - 561 Lancasters, 314 Halifaxes, 16 Mosquitos - were dispatched to Berlin. This was the largest force sent to Berlin and the largest non-1,000 bomber force sent to any target, exceeding the previous record of 826 aircraft (which included Stirlings and Wellingtons) sent to Dortmund on the night of 23/24 May 1943. It was also the first time that more than 500 Lancasters and more than 300 Halifaxes were dispatched. The German controllers were able to plot the bomber stream soon after it left the English coast but the swing north over Denmark for the approach flight proved too far distant for many of the German fighters. The German controller ordered the fighters not to fly over Berlin, leaving the target area free for the flak, but many fighters ignored him and attacked bombers over the city. The diversion to Frankfurt-on-Oder failed to draw any fighters. 43 aircraft - 26 Lancasters, 17 Halifaxes -were lost, 4.8 per cent of the force.
    Berlin was covered by cloud for most of the raid. Heavy bombing fell on the centre and south-western districts and some of Berlin's most important war industries were hit, including the large Siemensstadt area. This was really the end of the true 'Battle of Berlin'; only one more raid took place on the city in this period and that was not for more than a month.


    'The Bomber Command War Diaries' - M. Middlebrook / C. Everitt.[/QUOTE]
     
  4. tfranc01

    tfranc01 New Member

    Maurice was my uncle and I have all his log books, photo's and documents.
    I am currently working with the Lincoln Bomber Command Museum and all of this information is likely to be digitised for anyone to access. There are some crew photos and also quite a lot of photos of Maurice's training journey across Canada and America. Maurice's name along with the majority of all lost aircrew are now recorded in steel at the Lincoln War Memorial. It is an incredibly friendly and interesting museum and is a must to visit.Tony France
     
    Heath Stimpson likes this.
  5. harkness

    harkness Well-Known Member

    1939 REGISTER
    Parkfield Lodge, Harrow U.D., Middlesex

    Name - DOB - Occupation - Marital status
    Harry - Stimpson - 13 Oct 1886 - Housekeeper & Sheperd On Farm, Heavy Worker - Married
    Nellie L Stimpson - 03 Jun 1887 - Unpaid Domestic Duties - Married
    Eileen Vera Bayley (Stimpson) - 18 Feb 1913 - Fruit Greengrocers Shop Assistant - Single
    Nellie L R France (Stimpson) - ? Mar 1915 - Retail Dairy Book Keeper - Single
    Maurice C Stimpson - 08 Sep 1921 - Electrical Supply Co's Storekeeper - Single
     
  6. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

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