Dunkirk and France 1940 Campaign Books

Discussion in '1940' started by Drew5233, Dec 26, 2009.

  1. Thanks Drew, that explains it!
     
  2. Gooseman

    Gooseman Senior Member

    Zeiss and Leica produced excellent consumer cameras in the thirties. They were also quite affordable, whereas these products remained quite luxurious in foreign countries. The German products didn't have much competition. It was only after WWII that the revolutionary German photo and film camera's were easily obtainable elsewhere. And quickly copied too.

    Another reason that we have so much photographs of the German side of the war - at least parts of that side (it was forbidden to photograph German KIA) - is the active use of the so called Propaganda Kompanies. These semi- or full-military photographers and filmers were specifically assigned the task to capture the operations and successes on film. Sometimes famous battles or actions were re-enacted. The taking of the Moerdijk bridges in Holland (airbornes, May 1940) was filmed and editted with actual airbornes and AFV's in 1941 and released as 'Sprung in den Feind' [=Jump into enemy territory] to show in the cinema's.

    Also regular troops had appointed photographers in coy or bat staffs. I know for a fact that the airbornes had distributed quite some cameras amongst their troops to take snap shots of the operation in orde to be able to 'steal the show' upon their eventual success. Although the operation in Holland was not the expected walk in the parc, plenty of photos remained of those days. Even during genuine battle photos were taken, which enriches not only the images we may gain from those events, but which also bear proof of uniforms, weapons, locations, assets, etc.

    Another thing is what Drew already addressed. Most Allied troops were not allowed to take cameras beyond their barracks or didn't trust their cameras to be save in the barracks or during displacements. It is stunning how few (little?) footage, both freeze-frame and moving, can be found of the Westfeldzug on the Allied side. But beside the fact that a losing war is not a war one likes to take photos of, being a soldier, the lost ground was taken by Germans. The cameras found by German soldiers were not returned, but confiscated. Like most things taken from POWs were not returned.
     
  3. Orwell1984

    Orwell1984 Senior Member

    [​IMG]

    The Dutch profile series does some excellent profiles on Dutch aircraft of World War Two that are often hard to information on in English. This profile on the Douglas DB-8A/3N which suffered heavy losses in 1940 flying as a heavy fighter is due in Winter 2012. A great addition to cover one of the lesser known aircraft of 1940.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. JCB

    JCB Senior Member

    Another reason that we have so much photographs of the German side of the war - at least parts of that side (it was forbidden to photograph German KIA) - is the active use of the so called Propaganda Kompanies. These semi- or full-military photographers and filmers were specifically assigned the task to capture the operations and successes on film. Sometimes famous battles or actions were re-enacted. The taking of the Moerdijk bridges in Holland (airbornes, May 1940) was filmed and editted with actual airbornes and AFV's in 1941 and released as 'Sprung in den Feind' [=Jump into enemy territory] to show in the cinema's.



    There are colour photos around of a German film unit in Dunkirk post evacuation, is this movie film available anywhere ?
    Craig
     
  5. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    There are colour photos around of a German film unit in Dunkirk post evacuation, is this movie film available anywhere ?
    Craig

    I think its viewable on Youtube and quite possibly someone posted a link to it in the 1940 section of the forum.
     
  6. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Kensington To St. Valery En Caux. 'Princess Louise's Kensington Regiment, France to England, Summer of 1940' by Robert Gardner.

    Publised this year.
     
  7. wtid45

    wtid45 Very Senior Member

    Saw this in tesco today, cant find mention of it elsewhere on the forum apologies if I missed it. I Fought at Dunkirk
     
  8. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Cheers Jason - Looks like it went on sale today?
     
  9. JCB

    JCB Senior Member

    Yes thanks for link Jason .Nice of them to give us 48 trial pages of the book to read on the net ! Seems well researched . Particularly agree with his comments on how sparse the unit diaries are once the fighting starts .
    The cover picture and inside picture look like stills from the French film 'Weekend at Zuydecoote ' wonder if its acknowledeged .
    Craig
     
  10. macdak64

    macdak64 Junior Member

    Dunkirk Spirit by Alan Pearce. I just read this book. it was very good
     
  11. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Dunkirk Spirit by Alan Pearce. I just read this book. it was very good

    Would I be correct in assuming its a fiction book?
     
  12. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Saw this in tesco today, cant find mention of it elsewhere on the forum apologies if I missed it. I Fought at Dunkirk

    Just ordered a copy on Abe for £4.50 :D
     
  13. Peccavi

    Peccavi Senior Member

    Dunkirk 1940 Operation Dynamo by Colonel Douglas C Dildy (USAF retired).

    Newish but small book published 2010 by Osprey.

    Seems pretty balanced and gave me more infomation on the role of the French and Belgians in the action which he starts from 24th May.

    Good charts and pictures.
     
  14. gmyles

    gmyles Senior Member

    Hi

    Just got a tired old copy of "The Epic Of Dunkirk" by E Keble Chatterton first published in 1940.

    I got it for just a penny! plus postage.

    It has lots of info about the boats used during the evacuation, including the SS Killarney which brought my father back safely to Dover.

    If anyone wants a lookup, I will be happy to help.

    Gus
     
  15. CaroleH89

    CaroleH89 Member

    While I think of it are there any recommendations for St Valery and the sinking of the Lancastria.



    Have you read The Sinking of the Lancastria by Jonathan Fenby? Pretty good from what I can remember of it, but it's a few years since I read my copy, may have to re-read it once I've read Montefiore's Dunkirk book which is on my list for Christmas.
     
  16. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Does anyone know if there are any books specific to the Battle of Arras, May 1940?
     
  17. Orwell1984

    Orwell1984 Senior Member

    Does anyone know if there are any books specific to the Battle of Arras, May 1940?
    I did a search for the same thing not too long ago. I found some articles written in French but only one book specific to Arras. However it looks at three battles of Arras in 1711, 1917 and 1940. The book is The Shadow of Vimy Ridge by Kenneth Macksey published by William Kimber in 1965.
    Here's a description of the book:
    Vimy Ridge is the key to the defence of the city of Arras, above which it looms. Because of this, it has become a battlefield for British troops in three wars-for Arras is, and always has been, a centre of communications and a gateway to Paris. In 1711, the French under Villars blocked Marlborough's advance to Paris, but Marlborough feinted towards Arras and then swung across Vimy Ridge, crossed the River Scarpe below it at Arleux and brought off a brilliant outflanking movement which completely turned the tables on his opponent. In the First World War, the Germans seized Vimy Ridge, but the Canadians finally dislodged the Germans from the Ridge in 1917 and it turned out to be a bulwark of the defence. In 1940, a Panzer army led by Rommel tried to bypass the British defenders. A counter-stroke stopped Rommel in his tracks. Arras and the Ridge fell to the enemy but not until the German advance had been delayed long enough for the British army to slip away through Dunkirk. In 1944, they returned at the head of a victorious Allied army! A detailed account of these battles is explored by Major Kenneth Macksey.

    Copies are available relatively cheaply on Amazon UK
    Amazon.co.uk: shadow of vimy ridge: Books

    Cheers
    Mark
     
  18. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Top man Mark-Just ordered a copy. Any specifically just on the 1940 battle would be appreciated.
     
  19. idler

    idler GeneralList Patron

    Doesn't seem to be mentioned in this thread: the Army Battlefield Guide: Belgium and Northern France by Richard Holmes - 40 pages on the counterattack. Sure it's been mentioned somewhere...
     
  20. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Doesn't seem to be mentioned in this thread: the Army Battlefield Guide: Belgium and Northern France by Richard Holmes - 40 pages on the counterattack. Sure it's been mentioned somewhere...

    I asked if the book was any good sometime ago somewhere on here - I still have it in my wants list in Abe :)

    Any other 1940 stuff in it?
     

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