Dieppe Raid, 19th August, 1942

Discussion in 'NW Europe' started by 17thDYRCH, Aug 16, 2010.

  1. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Gerry -
    we were never engaged in that party as it appeared to be all the 4th and 10th Indians and the Polish divs job assisted by a regiment of 9th Armoured Bde - they all did an old time Cavalry Charge near Ancona - scared the hell out of Von Etterlin - we sqweezed the Poles out just over the Metauro-before Cattolica
    meanwhile - after the Liri - we went swanning off towards Florence to confuse Kesselring - that the two Canadian Divs would hit him there- and in fact he pulled 1st Para and 26th PZ;s from the coast as he thought the Canadians were doing a Landing there- to the Florence area then Leese came up with Olive so we turned around at Siena - over to Fabriano - and onto the Metauro at Iesi - we had left the 1st Cdn Armoured bde at Florence- throwing cigarette packets into the Arno to keep up the pretence - then WE had to change our numbers to theirs - it was a hoot !

    Mind you Petrol was way cheaper in those days- two bdes of Tanks at 4 gallons to the mile - frightening to-day !
    Cheers
     
  2. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Following on my comment about Jack Nissenthal (The VC that never was) I have just received the following short piece from an MD in the US that gives some background to his post-war career.

    The more I learn about Jack, the more bitter I feel that he was never publicly thanked or awarded for his wartime activities.

    Ron

    My memories of Jack Nissen (as we all knew him) date from my childhood through young adulthood in South Africa. Jack and Dell had a record store and nobody could understand why they did what they did because, bless them both, they didn't have a head for business and they were right next door to a store whose owners did.

    It turns out that, the way I understand it, Field Marshall Smuts had invited Jack to come to South Africa straight after the war and set up radar in South Africa. However, during the sea voyage from England, Smuts and his ruling party were voted out of office and the new Nationalist party wanted none of Smuts's ideas.
    Jack and Dell, as well as their two children, became family friends.

    Two more modest people I would be hard-pressed to name. Always friendly, kind and hospitable. I will never forget Dell's booming cockney laugh. In over twenty years I did not hear an unkind word from either of them. When my father underwent orthopedic surgery, Jack was one of the first to visit him in hospital.

    Our paths diverged in the 1970s: Linda moved to London, Jack and Dell to Toronto, and I myself emigrated to the US.

    When Jack's book appeared it came as a complete surprise as they had kept completely silent about his WW2 exploits. His book was written so modestly that I had to delve a bit but it became clear to me that Jack had worked with Sir Robert Watson-Watt on the radar system which ultimately saved not only England but us all. That to say nothing of Dieppe.

    It has not been my lot to meet the great and good (in South Africa the latter are in extremely short supply). Jack was, with the wisdom of hindsight, the greatest man I ever met. It was a privelege to have known him.

    Peter Appelbaum
     
  3. 17thDYRCH

    17thDYRCH Senior Member Patron

    Ron

    Interesting follow up on Jack Nissenthal.
    What are the book details?

    Cheers
    Randy
     
  4. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

  5. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Tom
    Here is a good website regarding the man, which I found very interesting.
    Jack Nissenthall at Dieppe


    Many thanks for giving the link to the Harry Palmer Gallery, I personally read it many moons ago, but I know that others will find it most revealing.

    17thDYRCH
    Interesting follow up on Jack Nissenthal.
    What are the book details?


    Have started looking for details and will report back SAP

    Ron
     
  6. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    Ron,

    Slightly off topic, but I am currently reading the book "Ultra goes to war" and this book explains the great lengths gone to to keep Ultra intelligence from being compromised.

    It is little wonder that such daring deeds were not rewarded as there was a total blackout and many people were not given the due credit and awards that they deserved.

    Regards
    Tom
     
  7. 17thDYRCH

    17thDYRCH Senior Member Patron

    Tom

    Helluva a story about Jack Nissenthal. Thanks for the post.

    Ron
    Noted with thanks. He had some history here in Canada so hopefully the book details will lead to something.

    cheers from Canada
     
  8. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Tom
    It is little wonder that such daring deeds were not rewarded as there was a total blackout and many people were not given the due credit and awards that they deserved.


    I do appreciate that at the time and perhaps up to 30/40 years after there was a need to keep these matters hushed up but now, 65 years later ?

    Jack Nissenthal, RIP, truly the VC that never was !

    Ron
     
  9. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    For 17thDYRCH and other interested members

    Winning the Radar War
    Publisher: Macmillan, 1987.
    ISBN 0-7715-9510-7
    Publisher: Collins, 1987
    ISBN 0-00-2150428-5 (Paperback edition).
    Publisher St. Martins Press, 1987.
    ISBN 0-312-01535-6 (U.S. edition).
    Publisher: Robert Hale and Sons, 1987.

    No technology was more important than radar in the winning of the Second World War. This book tells of the race to develop radar in the words of Jack Nissen who was involved in the radar war from the very beginning. (See also Green Beach, 1975, by James Leasor)

    "The account of the Dieppe raid alone is worth reading as (a) narrative of one survivor's heroism in a decimating battle." (The Virginian Pilot & Ledger Star, 3 April 1988.)

    J.Nissenthal & AW Cockerill

    Ron
     
  10. 17thDYRCH

    17thDYRCH Senior Member Patron

    Ron

    Many thanks for the book details.

    Cheers from Canada
     
  11. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    daviidwilson

    Welcome aboard !

    Ron
     
  12. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Have just been posted the contents of a speech recently made by Prince Charles and immediately spotted this reference to Jack Nissenthal.
    EXCERPT FROM A SPEECH GIVEN BY PRINCE CHARLES AT A DINNER TO CELEBRATE THE 250TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BOARD OF DEPUTIES OF BRITISH JEWS AT THE GUILDHALL, 5TH JULY 2011


    If I may, Ladies and Gentlemen, I just want to recall and recognize
    the fact that in two World Wars British Jews made an outstanding
    contribution to the defence of our values and of our liberty, on land, at sea and in the air.
    Many thousands were killed in action, on all the War fronts. Jews also volunteered to be parachuted behind enemy lines, and to serve on the most dangerous of missions. I know that my great uncle, Lord Mountbatten, was enormously proud of the Jewish airman, RAF
    Flight Sergeant Jack Nissenthall, a radar specialist.
    He knew that he would have to be shot by his own men if he was about to be captured, but he went ashore at Dieppe in 1942 to examine a crucial German radar station on the cliff top.



    Dare I hope that this might help to lead to his rightful recognition ?

    Ron
     
  13. Jedburgh22

    Jedburgh22 Very Senior Member

    Part of the lessons of Dieppe was the need for specialist teams to be trained to prevent or sabotage enemy demolition plans - the utilization and training of these teams under the code-name Counter-Scorch was entrusted to SOE/OSS and had a fair degree of success in both the Normandy and Dragoon landings.
     
  14. Wills

    Wills Very Senior Member

    Montgomery's genuis and ability to predict - beach landing Slapton Sands 1938!

    In 1938, Montgomery had initiated landing-from-the-sea exercises at Slapton Sands. Later while Eisenhower went about his administrative duties, Montgomery showed the top American field soldiers old military maps detailing the wide bay, the long beach and, close inland, a series of joined lakes, called the Slapton Leys. He then compared them to Normandy’s “Utah” beach, the most westerly of the five code-named invasion points. The two were amazingly similar.

    Dieppe was if memory of studies serves something he started to doubt and when tasked to take over 8th Army took his eye off and left it to Mountbatten.
     
  15. Jedburgh22

    Jedburgh22 Very Senior Member

  16. martin14

    martin14 Senior Member

    Today is the anniversary of the Raid:


    please take a moment to Remember those who paid the ultimate price on that day.


    Rest in Peace.
     
  17. 17thDYRCH

    17thDYRCH Senior Member Patron

    Today is the anniversary of the Raid:


    please take a moment to Remember those who paid the ultimate price on that day.


    Rest in Peace.

    Canada suffered 3.367 casualties that day including 913 deaths. Dieppe became a synonym for military fiasco.

    :poppy:Lest We Forget:poppy:
     
  18. militarycross

    militarycross Very Senior Member

    We will remember them.

    Appropriately, there is a gentle rain here this morning, tears perhaps from heaven.

    phil
     

    Attached Files:

    dbf likes this.
  19. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Wills -
    as I recall- Montgomery was given the job to Command the Torch Landings in North Africa with 1st Army for November '42- and recommended that security had been breached and therefore the Dieppe landing should be cancelled - which it was - then Mountbatten joined the C.o.S committee and to show that he was as good as they were - resurrected the Dieppe Operation and the fateful results - meanwhile Strafer Gott was killed taking over 8th Army and Monty was called for that job which he did on 12th August '42. So Mountbatten's ego trip did the damage...
    Cheers
     
  20. Wills

    Wills Very Senior Member

    Thanks Tom. I was being a tad lazy - should have looked it up!

    Yours Aye
     

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