Chindit badge

Discussion in 'Burma & India' started by zahonado, Apr 5, 2015.

  1. zahonado

    zahonado Well-Known Member

    Thought you might be interested in dads badge plus a brooch in ivory which I've just unearthed,plus I have a new I pad which makes this stuff a whole lot easier! image.jpg
     
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  2. Staffsyeoman

    Staffsyeoman Member

    That is one of the nicest cloth Chindit badges I have ever seen - and I've seen a few; good, bad, and badly faked.
     
  3. The Cooler King

    The Cooler King Elite Member

    Lovely Condition.... a couple of treasures............... :)
     
  4. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

  5. zahonado

    zahonado Well-Known Member

    Thanks guys...desperately trying to get stuff photographed for the book. Interesting to see so many examples individually stitched, thanks for that Steve. I don't think I ever saw my mother wearing the brooch though!
     
  6. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    There are many variants, which I guess just boil down to where they were commissioned and made in India. I have one example from a Chindit 2 group, which was given to me by a fellow researcher who I helped with some Chindit related stuff a few years ago.

    My Nan had nothing along these lines, but the cloth insignia and name for that matter did not exist in the mainstream until well after the 1943 operation was concluded.
     
  7. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

  8. Hebridean Chindit

    Hebridean Chindit Lost in review...

    I have my dad's Cameronians Glengarry badge but there never was a sign of a Chindit badge...

    I knew about the link Steve place above and tend to concur with him on their source... there was probably a basic pattern and dozens (?) of manufacturers, hence the irregularity in them...

    As an aside, a couple of months back I picked up a pair of (what appear to be) quite old Chinthe book-ends... in need of some tlc... not perfect matches but still quite nice...
     
  9. Staffsyeoman

    Staffsyeoman Member

    Similarly, my uncle (father's brother) who went to India with 1st Royal Warwicks but was transferred to the Chindits - if he brought anything back I never saw any of it. (The family tale was that his wife threw everything out in the late 1950s, slouch hat, badges, heaven only knows where his medals went - before I came along).

    The gift to the faker is that so many Chindt badges were "bazaar made" and the current plethora of south Asian faking firms can knock out badges in the right materials that can be explained away as such.
     
  10. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Sounds intriguing mate, where did you find those then.
     
  11. zahonado

    zahonado Well-Known Member

    Yes I am sure Dads was the genuine article! Is there really a value on them that would make them worth faking? Trying to think of who in the family will want these things eventually...the trouble is, when you are young you are not interested and when you are old there's not a lot left you can do with them!
     
  12. Hebridean Chindit

    Hebridean Chindit Lost in review...

    Miss-advertised greedbay purchase, me-ol' Bamboo... I'll snap them in the morning and post here... they're definitely not "Chinese temple lions"... :biggrin:

    Za/F ... I know exactly where you're coming from on that point ... I always try an persuade people to ask the questions of their elders now and not when it's too late; but as to where it goes after that point, we can only try and pass the baton over... who cares to take it may be beyond our capabilities...

    As for faking... the answer to a value is yes...
     
  13. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Look forward to seeing them. I have two sets from my trip to Burma in 2008. A metal pair on my bookcase and a small alabastery type pair guarding my computer. I have one :rolleyes: wooden example looking out of the shed window facing east.

    So, I'm not slightly obsessed then!!!
     
  14. Hebridean Chindit

    Hebridean Chindit Lost in review...

    As you can see... in need of some TLC... and as for the slatherings of glue that failed... ;)
     

    Attached Files:

  15. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    I like them HC, but does the good lady, that is the real question. :lol:
     
  16. Hebridean Chindit

    Hebridean Chindit Lost in review...

    Tolerated, much like your better half, I suspect... they both know our little obsessions... :screwy: :biggrin:
     
  17. zahonado

    zahonado Well-Known Member

    I like them too, HC!
    Been thinking about the badges. I am wondering about who decided this would be a symbol for the brigades that went into Burma under Wingate. And when was it adopted ...before during or after? Or was it something that someone had copied in the bazaar and everyone thought they would have one too. Sort of like gangs and tattoos etc? Did the troops wear them during the campaign or afterwards, when they were fighting elsewhere? Or only after the war was over?
     
  18. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Hi zahonado,

    Anecdotally the name and symbol was said to have been suggested by Captain Aung Thin of the Burma Rifles. He was a member of Wingate's Brigade Head Quarters in 1943, serving as a Liaison Officer and Propagandist. It was a mispronunciation of the Burmese word, Chinthe (the mythical creatures that stand guard outside Burmese Pagodas).

    Aung Thin suggested that the half griffin (RAF Air Supply), half lion (Army Ground Forces) styled creatures, symbolised the very nature of the 77th Brigade and their task in Burma that year.

    The name and badge was seized upon after the first expedition had ended. There was certainly no insignia present in 1943 and the men on Operation Longcloth were not aware of their nickname until well after the more fortunate ones returned to India. I am not sure about 1944, but I have only ever seen men wearing the cloth insignia in photographs taken post Operation Thursday. But as I say, on the last point I cannot be certain.

    Captain Maung Aung Thin DSO, photo taken on Operation Longcloth.

    Aung Thin HQ Brigade. copy 3.jpg
     
  19. Charpoy Chindit

    Charpoy Chindit Junior Member

    No, the badges weren't worn until after the 1944 campaign.
     
  20. Hebridean Chindit

    Hebridean Chindit Lost in review...

    Za... I'll post the cleaned and repaired items when done, which won't be soon...

    The 111th was originally called "The Leopards", as discussed between Joe Lentaigne and Jack Master's in his book, "The Road Past Mandalay", but this was never followed through... and although no insignia of any kind was worn whilst "in" this is the text that was headed by the now reasonably familiar logo... so, arguably, this is the "original"...?
    It has been cleaned up a bit but I never had a great copy of it to work with...

    The text that went with this is as follows... note the date...

    This is YOUR badge.
    It means that
    You are a member of SPECIAL FORCE.
    You are proud of SPECIAL FORCE.
    All ranks SPECIAL FORCE are proud of you.

    1. You have come out from the middle of BURMA, where you have done your job in a manner which has thrilled the whole world. You have hit the JAP where it hurts him most - in the guts.
    You have shown determination and endurance. You have out-manoeuvred and out fought the enemy. You have every right to be proud of yourself.
    Now you are tired, and need rest and bucking up. I am doing my best to see that you get the rest which is your due.
    2. Your Chinthe badge will attract attention and comment. You must see that the reputation you and your pals have earned in battle does not flutter from your behaviour out of battle.
    The badge of the FORCE should show that you are not only “SPECIAL” in fighting but also “SPECIAL” in discipline and behaviour.
    This is a young show which has already made a name. See to it that you do nothing to let it down.
    Whether in or out of barracks or on leave, your bearing, turn-out and behaviour should be that of a man belonging to a picked unit, which is what you are.
    3. You will be asked questions by others about your job and experiences, but there are certain subjects about which you must NOT talk. If you do, you will endanger the lives of those still in BURMA and those who go in next time.
    You must NOT tell anyone what units are part of SPECIAL FORCE.
    You must NOT talk about the details of how you went in and out of BURMA, how you got your rations, how the air helped you, and how your wireless messages were sent and received.
    You must NOT talk about your special training, equipment and arms.
    The safety of your comrades in SPECIAL FORCE depends on your loyalty and good sense.
    I know that I can depend on you to be discreet.
    4. Finally you must remember that the fine work you have done is not the end of the war. We have won this round on points - in the next round we will go in for a knock out. You are now fully trained and know your stuff. Your job is to train the new fellows and lead them next time. Teach them to kill with every round. Teach them that the jungle is nothing like as bad as it is cracked up to be. Teach them that though it’s a tough job it’s a man’s job, a job worth doing, and a job thats got to be done if eo want to get back to Civvy Street quickly.
    Good luck and I hope you have a good leave

    (Signed Joe Lentaigne)
    Maj-Gen. Comd. Special Forces.
    26th April 1944
     

    Attached Files:

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