British Prisoners in Soviet hands ?

Discussion in 'Others' started by Verrieres, Jul 29, 2009.

  1. Verrieres

    Verrieres no longer a member

    Hi, Just sorting out some POW related photographs and can across this I thought at first it was a column of German PoW`s but on closer inspection I believe some are British! ...or am I missing something.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. A-58

    A-58 Not so senior Member

    They could have been recently liberated from German POW camps in areas overrun by the Red Army, being escorted to the rear (and reletive safety). Of course that is only my opinion, and hopefully that is what happened to them.
     
  3. greenbaron

    greenbaron Member

    British? I do not believe so. Look at their uniforms, especially at their blouse and berets. They seem to be Romanian POWs, do not forget they deployed their units to Stalingrad area on the Wehrmacht side along with some Hungarian, Slovak, Spanish and Italian troops...
     
  4. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    I'd say Italian looking at the berets :)
     
  5. -tmm-

    -tmm- Senior Member

    They don't look like British troops to me.
     
  6. Verrieres

    Verrieres no longer a member

    British? I do not believe so. Look at their uniforms, especially at their blouse and berets. They seem to be Romanian POWs, do not forget they deployed their units to Stalingrad area on the Wehrmacht side along with some Hungarian, Slovak, Spanish and Italian troops...



    Quite possible........however I did not say all take a closer look. Dont be swayed by the front ranks tunics,Does anyone know which nations armies wore berets apart from the British,Canadians and like Drew rightly mentions the Italians? Tricky :D

    Verrieres
     
  7. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Hot air manufacturer

    French Chasseurs and Fortress troops did.
     
  8. ADM199

    ADM199 Well-Known Member

    Is there a date with the photograph.

    In 1945 there were British, French, Danish etc Liberated P.O.W. who were repatriated out of the Black sea Ports.
     
  9. Verrieres

    Verrieres no longer a member

    Is there a date with the photograph.

    In 1945 there were British, French, Danish etc Liberated P.O.W. who were repatriated out of the Black sea Ports.


    Hi,
    All the photographs I was sent (700+) were described as `Soviet Snapshots 1945` Sorry thats all I know.

    Verrieres
     
  10. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    They wearing what looks like Service Dress, which some British troops wore in 1940.
    I doubt it would survive until 1945 in a POW camp.
    That's what's making them look British.
    I don't think they are though.
     
  11. ADM199

    ADM199 Well-Known Member

    They wearing what looks like Service Dress, which some British troops wore in 1940.
    I doubt it would survive until 1945 in a POW camp.
    That's what's making them look British.
    I don't think they are though.

    Uniforms and boots in many cases were replaced via the Red X in Europe. Not necessarily replaced with kit from the same Branch of Service though.
     
  12. Kieron Hill

    Kieron Hill Senior Member

    Not sure if they are British, Italian or French etc...
    but the Russians moved alot of liberated British
    pow troops back to Russia after the war and
    many never ever returned, forced to work in
    labour camps. I read somewhere that the
    goverment at the time tried to cover it up.
     
  13. Kieron Hill

    Kieron Hill Senior Member

    I tried to find the piece that I read on British and
    American pows but couldn't find it, but I found the
    following article on the site below:

    http://redstateeclectic.typepad.com/.../repatriation-the-dark-side-of-world-war-ii.html

    Repatriation — The Dark Side of World War II

    There were lots of dark sides to WWII but Jacob Hornberger recounts one which shows yet another reason why FDR was one of the worst presidents in our history. His seven-piece article focuses on the fate of POWs after the war's end where allied Russian POWs recovered from the Germans and in American hands were sent back to Russia and their ultimate doom under Operation Keelhaul, while U.S. & British prisoners of war (20,000 & 30,000 respectively) were left in Russia forever and covered up by the U.S. government (you know, the very same government that tells us we should support the troops):
    How could the U.S. government tell the truth about what happened to American servicemen? To tell the truth would mean exposing American complicity in the murder of over a million innocent Russian people. It would entail a closer examination of the Allied alliance with one of the most brutal political regimes in all of history. And it would expose all the scheming and machinations that resulted in the abandonment of over 50,000 Allied soldiers to our communist "friends."
    What could the U.S. government have done differently as the war approached its end? It could have negotiated a peace with Germany that entailed the exile of Nazi leaders and ensured democratic regimes in all of Germany and Eastern Europe. It could have refused to participate in one of the worst holocausts in history — the forcible repatriation of Russian anticommunists — by refusing to force them to return to the Soviet Union against their will.
    If Russian forces refused to return American and British POWs, one option would, of course, could have been war against the Soviet Union. But if war was not a practical option at that point, then the least that the U.S. government owed its own soldiers was to let the world know what happened — so that the soldiers would never be forgotten. Imagine the loneliness those men must have felt as they were being transported to the Soviet gulags. They had trusted their own government. They had fought and had been willing to die at the behest of their government. They had helped to win the war. Instead of coming home to their loved ones, they were being transported from a German POW camp to a Russian gulag.
    ... Unfortunately, however, they were forgotten, because they were abandoned by their own government — the same U.S. government that starts out every new war with "Support the troops."
    As the authors of Soldiers of Misfortunecarefully document, U.S. governmental officials not only have refused to open the files on this dark and sordid episode of World War II, they have also altered and destroyed pertinent documents. Moreover, American officials still refuse to open up the files on the forcible repatriation of the Russians as well as other aspects of World War II. They claim that national security is at stake — fifty years after the end of the war.
    History may be written by the victors, but in this day of information technology, so too can the truth. And the truth is that war is a deadly game where seemingly sane minds put their trust in megalomaniacal hands to be lead to unforeseen ends for obscure reasons.
    "You can no more win a war than you can win an earthquake." – Jeannette Rankin
     
  14. Groundhugger

    Groundhugger Senior Member

    If they were british POW's being moved they would have been carrying 'all' of their possession with them wearing all their clothes to keep warm , blanket rolls , cooking equipment for a brew homemade backpacks etc . if they had been liberated from their German captors they look too 'smart' for POW's that late in the war ,
    IMHO
    John
     
  15. Jedburgh22

    Jedburgh22 Very Senior Member

  16. soim1

    soim1 Junior Member

    Owen and Verrieres like this.
  17. Verrieres

    Verrieres no longer a member

  18. Rav4

    Rav4 Senior Member

  19. Gerard

    Gerard Seelow/Prora

  20. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    I agree with gerard's comments.

    Regardless of Nationality, those unfortunate to be sent East to the Siberian Gulags, were extremely lucky to survive and only a small percentage returned home.

    Regards
    Tom
     

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