British aristocracy losses in WW2

Discussion in 'Searching for Someone & Military Genealogy' started by L J, Sep 5, 2009.

  1. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    See also Owen's post - no. 25 of this thread.

    From The Times, June 3, 1940:

    ROLL OF HONOUR
    DEATH OF DUKE OF NORTHUMBERLAND
    From Our Correspondent

    ALNWICH, JUNE 2

    The flying of the Duke of Northumberland's flag, the blue lion rampant, at half-mast on the keep of Alnwick Castle this morning was the first intimation to the people of Alnwick that the Duke had been killed in action. The news had been conveyed, in a message from the Duchess of Northumberland, by Mr. T.W. Haward (the Duke's commissioner) and Archdeaon Mangin (his chaplain).

    People streaming from the churches glanced up at the flag and wondered. The news soon spread over the town and countryside, where the Duke was known as a benefactor of the people and a generous landlord to those on his large estates.

    From The Times, June 3, 1940:
    OBITUARY

    THE DUKE OF NORTHUMBERLAND
    DEATH ON ACTIVE SERVICE

    The Duke of Northumberland, Grenadier Guards, whose death in action is announced on another page, was born on July 15, 1912. He was Henry George Alan Percy, the eldest son of the eighth Duke by his marriage to Lady Helen Gordon Lennox, daughter of the seventh Duke of Richmond. He was educated at Eton and joined the Grenadier Guards. He succeeded his father in 1930 as ninth Duke and also as Earl of Northumberland and of Beverley, Earl Percy, Baron Warkworth, Lord Lovaine, and Baron of Alnwick, and as twelfth baronet created Smithson (now Percy) of Stanwick in 1660, and thus became head of the great family of Percy. He inherited Alnwick Castle, Northumberland, Syon House, Brentford, and Albury Park, Guildford, as well as other estates.

    When he came of age in 1933 he made a speech to his tenantry in which he announced that he was about to start a long tour in many parts of the Empire oversea and in foreign countries. "I hope," he added, "that by this means I shall better equip myself to play my part in life and in the management of my estates. In particular, I shall try to see something of the agricultural systems of other countries. I should much like to understand better than I do the great industry upon which the prosperity of this country so largely depends." He added that during his absence his mother would manage the estates, and he thanked his mother, Lord Irwin (now Lord Halifax), and his uncle, Lord Eustace Percy, for all they had done for him in their capacity as trustees.

    After his return from his travels the Duke was appointed Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Lord Privy Seal, and in 1936 to the same office with the Secretary of State for Air. In March, 1939, the Duke found himself obliged, owing to the pressure of taxation, to give up living in Alnwick Castle. Fortunately he had a more modest dwelling close by in Lesbury House. He announced at the same time that he had no intention of giving up his pack of hounds. The Duke's sister, Lady Elizabeth Percy, was married in 1937 to the Marquess of Douglas and Clydesdale, who last March succeeded his father as 14th Duke of Hamilton and 11th Duke of Brandon. The Duke of Northumberland is succeeded by his brother, Lord Hugh Algernon Percy, who was born in 1914 and was gazetted to a commission in The Northumberland Hussars in 1936.


    From The Times, June 28, 1940
    OBITUARIES
    PERSONAL TRIBUTES

    DUKE OF NORTHUMBERLAND

    R.R.M. writes:-

    May one who knew him intimately from his childhood write a few words of tribute to the late Duke of Northumberland, who so bravely laid down his life while leading a platoon of Grenadier Guards to silence an enemy machine-gun which was enfilading our troops. It was a dangerous piece of invaluable service, crowned with success. But it meant death - a noble death such as he would have desired.

    George, ninth Duke of Northumberland, bore a truly lovable and modest character. Those of us who knew him, whether as chairman, friend or colleague, are conscious of the loss of something very fine, something that we cannot replace in anything like the same degree. But the matter goes much further. He had great ideals, based on a deep religious principle. He was devoted to his mother and brothers and sisters, and the happy home life he shared with them; and was kindly and conscientious to all who knew him.

    With the heavy burden of the dukedom thrown upon him by his father's early and much regretted death, he very soon began to develop a great interest in his wide estates and his many tenantry, among whom he became immensely popular, as one who ever exhibited deep sympathy with them in their difficulties, shared with them in their amusements, and never grudged generous help.

    He had a passionate love for Northumberland and her history, and was never so happy as when hunting or shooting in that most lovely of counties. He was a fine horseman, Master of the Percy Hounds, and a first-rate shot. He had travelled round the world, which gave him great knowledge of the general outlook. He retained some of the happiest memories of his shooting trips in the heights of the Himalayas and the jungles of Africa.

    Side by side with his friendship and consideration for those among whom he lived, there had sprung up in him the desire to take his part in public work, and the county council and other organizations for social service realized his worth. Thus it caused no surprise to those who knew him that when his country called him in the hour of her need, he at once returned to the Grenadier Guards, his father's regiment in which he was a reserve officer., though he had never served as a regular soldier. Though he was offered a post of comparative safety elsewhere, he determined to go to the front, serving as a junior officer, and thus, a true son of his soldier father, he laid down his life.

    Northumberland bitterly mourns him to-day as a true Percy, a good friend and a generous landlord, and as one who, had he been spared, would have been a great and good Duke. The whole country is the poorer for the loss of one who so loyally and devotedly gave his life in the service of his King and Country.


    From Irish Times, Friday, October 11, 1940
    DUKE KILLED IN ACTION

    LEAVES £1,400,000
    Lieutenant Henry George Alan Percy, of the Grenadier Guards, twenty-seven years old, ninth Duke of Northumberland, who died on active service on May 21, left unsettled estate of the gross value of £1,446,489. Net personalty is £1,092,538, and estate duty of £193,883 has been paid.

    Probate of his will and codicil has been granted to his mother, Helen Magdalen, Duchess of Northumberland; his uncle, Lord Eustace Percy, and Lord Halifax, the Foreign Secretary.

    The young Duke died while leading a party of forty men of the Grenadier Guards in a bayonet charge against a German machine-gun enfilading British troops near Louvain.

    The wife of one of the Guardsmen afterwards told how she had heard that the Duke called for forty volunteers. "The Duke led them in the charge," she said, "but none of them returned. Later the Guards sent out a search party, but found only the body of the Duke." The operation was successful, however. The Duke and his men had given their lives to silence the gun.

    In 1936 the Ducal estates in Northumberland were turned into a private company.

    From The Irish Times, Friday, December 20, 1940:
    700 BRITISH WOUNDED IN BELGIAN HOSPITALS

    More than 700 British wounded are still being cared for in hospitals in various parts of Belgium, the Press Association learns in Belgian circles in London. Some 450 are in hospital at Enghien, while the military hospital at Ghen is still treating 12 officers, 20 N.C.O.'s and 239 soldiers. Others are in Brussels and at Malines.

    The personnel of a British ambulances is at Enghien hospital; wounded who have recovered have been sent to a camp in Germany, the Belgian Red Cross providing them with linen.

    Some 40 officers and men belonging to the Grenadier Guards, including the Duke of Northumberland, are buried at Esquelme [sic], near Tournai. One soldier, who fought at Audenaerde and was reported to have been killed, is now known to be a prisoner in Germany. - (P.A. War Special)


    Grenadier Guards of 3rd Battalion who also died on the same day.

    001 ABEL-SMITH RE 42107 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    002 ATHERTON J 2613216 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    003 BOYD ANA 78258 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    004 BRADBURY S 2614989 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    005 BROWN GA 2615316 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    006 BUCKLEY WN 2613138 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    007 BURNETT WSA 2613488 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    008 BUTTON G 6286759 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    009 CALEY G 823356 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    010 CARTER JT 873182 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    011 CATTERMOLE AJ 2613438 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    012 CHAPMAN W 2615800 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    013 COOK RJ 2616235 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    014 COTTRELL AN 2616260 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    015 DANIELS D 2614946 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    016 DEXTER HR 557505 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    017 DITCHETT F 2610908 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    018 DOYLE W 2613568 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    019 DUTTON WA 2615556 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    020 ELLERINGTON W 2614925 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    021 GASH W 2612111 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    022 GRANDFIELD LE 2616215 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    023 HAWKINS H 2615954 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    024 HAYES SJ 2612418 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    025 HICKS RJ 2610868 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    026 HOWE W 2615399 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    027 HUDSON JH 2615506 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    028 JAY AA 2612556 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    029 JENKINSON SW 2613361 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    030 JOHNS SG 2614861 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    031 JOHNSON AH 2613339 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    032 LINDLEY T 2612213 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    033 LITTLE HSE 2614860 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    034 MEADE WP 2613344 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    035 NEALE BG 2616211 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    036 PERCY HGA 51289 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    037 REYNELL-PACK H 71090 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    038 REYNOLDS EW 2613551 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    039 RICHES OG 2614724 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    040 RIMELL AR 2615321 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    041 ROWLAND WW 2611976 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    042 THOMPSON EJ 2616697 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    043 TITMUS JL 2613248 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    044 TURNER JH 2612157 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
    045 WENTWORTH WR 2613069 3RD BN 21/05/1940 GRENADIER GUARDS
     
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  2. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Couldn't see him on here, may be wrong (in a bit of a hurry).

    The Duke of Kent, the King's brother:

    The crash of Sunderland W4026 "DQ-M" of 228 Squadron

    Name: WINDSOR, GEORGE EDWARD ALEXANDER EDMUND
    Initials: G E A E
    Nationality: United Kingdom
    Rank: Air Commodore
    Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force (Auxiliary Air Force)
    Age: 39
    Date of Death: 25/08/1942
    Awards: K G, K T, G C M G, G C V O
    Additional information: Duke of Kent. Fourth son of His Majesty King George V and Her Majesty Queen Mary; husband of H.R.H. The Duchess of Kent.
    Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
    Cemetery: FROGMORE ROYAL BURIAL GROUND
     
  3. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    Thought an index might be handy... those with an 'alias' are listed under each name.

    ALINGTON/STURT, Napier George Henry, RAFVR, Post 63
    APSLEY/BATHURST, Allen Algernon, 1R Glos Hussars, Post 64
    ARUNELL of WARDOUR, John, 2 Wilts, Post 109
    ASTLEY-CORBETT, Francis Henry Rivers, 2SC, Post 51
    AUCKLAND/EDEN, Frederick Colvin George, RAF, Post 65

    BACKHOUSE, John Edmund, RA, Posts 29 & 30
    BAIRD, Robert Alexander, RAF, Post 61
    APSLEY/BATHURST, Allen Algernon, 1R Glos Hussars, Post 64
    BARTTELOT, Walter De Stopham, CG/6Gds Tk Bde, Posts 44 & 92
    BENN, Michael Julius W, RAFVR, Post 62
    BERRY, John Douglas, 3GG Post 15
    BLYTHSWOOD/DOUGLAS-CAMPBELL, Philip Archibald, SG, Post 52
    BOWES-LYON, John Patrick, 2SG, Post 53
    BOYLE, Patrick James, 2SG, Post 96
    BRABOURNE/KNATCHBULL, Norton Cecil Michael, 6GG, Post 16
    BRAYBROOKE/NEVILLE, Richard Henry Cornwallis, 3GG, Post 17
    BRAYBROOKE/ George Robert Latimer, RN, Post 17
    BRODRICK/STEWART-MACKENZIE, Michael Victor, 3CG, Posts 32, 36 & 91
    BRODRICK/STEWART-MACKENZIE, Francis Alan, RA, Post 33
    BUTLER, Anthony Danvers Cavendish, RAC/3Commando, Posts 74 & 75
    BUTLER, Beauchamp Henry, RInF, 1RIrF, Post 80
    BUTLER, Patrick Henry Stanley, 1SG, Post 54

    GARMOYLE/CAIRNS, Hugh Wilfred John, Post 72
    GOUGH-CALTHORPE, Ronald Arthur, RAFVR, Posts 66 & 77
    CAMPBELL, Colin, 3SG, Post 97
    CANNING, Victor Stratford de Redcliffe, 5GG, Post 18
    HARTINGTON/CAVENIDSH, WJR, 5CG, Post 40
    CHICHESTER/PELHAM, John Buxton, SG. Post 55
    COBBOLD, John Murray, SG, Post 98
    CONNAUGHT AND STRATHEARN/WINDSOR, Arthur William Patrick Albert, Post 67
    CONNAUGHT AND STRATHEARN/WINDSOR, Alistair Arthur Duff, RHG, Post 69
    CORBETT, John Polson, 2GG, Post 19

    DAVIES/LLANDINAM, David, R Welch Fus, Post 50
    DE RUTZEN, John Frederick Foley, 3WG, Post 82
    DES VOEUX, William Richard De B. 156 Para, Posts 27 & 48
    BLYTHSWOOD/DOUGLAS-CAMPBELL, Philip Archibald, SG, Post 52

    AUCKLAND/EDEN, Frederick Colvin George, RAF, Post 65
    ELVEDEN/GUINNESS, Arthur Onslow Edward, 55 (Suffolk Yeo) A/T Reg, Post 70
    ERSKINE, Alistair Robert Hervey, 2SG, Post 56
    EVANS, Henry Arthur, WG att 2 Hamps, Post 84
    EVANS, Geoffrey Norris, WG, Post 85

    FARRAGUT/MACALISTER, Peter Donald, RAFVR, Posts 71 & 78
    FASS, John Ernest, 1WG, Post 86
    FIENNES, Ranulph, R Scots Greys, Posts 94 & 95
    LANSDOWNE/PETTY-FITZMAURICE, Charles Hope, GG Post 5
    FITZMAURICE/PETTY-FITZMAURICE, Edward Norman 3IG Post 5
    FITZROY, Charles Oliver Edward, 4GG, Post 20
    FRANK, Howard Frederick, 2GG, Post 21
    SALTOUN/FRASER, Alexander Simon, 6GG, Post 26
    FURNESS, Christopher, 1WG, Post 2

    GARMOYLE/CAIRNS, Hugh Wilfred John, Post 72
    GIBBS, Vicary Paul, IGG, Posts 22 & 49
    PRESON/GORMANSTON, Jenico William Richard, KOYLI, Post 39
    PRESTON, Stephen Edward Thomas, 1IG, Post 39
    GOUGH-CALTHORPE, Ronald Arthur, RAFVR, Posts 66 & 77
    ELVEDEN/GUINNESS, Arthur Onslow Edward, 55 (Suffolk Yeo) A/T Reg, Post 70

    HAMILTON-RUSSELL, Gustavus Lascelles, GG, Post 23
    HAMILTON-RUSSEL, Desmond Claud, 1 R Dragoons, Post 23
    HARTINGTON/CAVENIDSH, WJR, 5CG, Post 40
    HAY, Edward Douglas John, GG, Post 24

    KAY-SHUTTLEWORTH, Richard Ughtred Paul, RAFVR, Posts 73, 79 & 83
    KAY-SHUTTLEWORTH, Ronald Orlando Lawrence, 138 Field Reg, RA, Post 73
    KEYES, Geoffrey Charles Tasker, R Scots Greys/11 Commando, Post 31
    BRABOURNE/KNATCHBULL, Norton Cecil Michael, 6GG, Post 16

    LANSDOWNE/PETTY-FITZMAURICE, Charles Hope, GG Post 5
    FITZMAURICE/PETTY-FITZMAURICE, Edward Norman 3IG Post 5
    LEWIN, Frederick, 1IG Post 8 & 13
    DAVIES/LLANDINAM, David, R Welch Fus, Post 50
    LONG, Walter Francis David, 5CG, Posts 45 & 46
    LOWTHER, John Arthur, RNVR, Posts 105 & 107
    LYELL, Charles Anthony, 1SG, Post 57

    FARRAGUT/MACALISTER, Peter Donald, RAFVR, Posts 71 & 78

    BRAYBROOKE/NEVILLE, Richard Henry Cornwallis, 3GG, Post 17
    BRAYBROOKE/ George Robert Latimer, RN, Post 17
    NORTH, Francis 144 (Surrey & Sussex Yeo) FR Post 14
    NORTHUMBERLAND/PERCY, Henry George Alan 3GG, Post 25, 93, 101 & 102

    O'NEILL, Brian Arthur, 1IG, Post 100
    O'NEILL, Shane Edward Robert, NIH, Post 100

    CHICHESTER/PELHAM, John Buxton, SG. Post 55
    NORTHUMBERLAND/PERCY, Henry George Alan 3GG, Post 25, 93, 101 & 102
    LANSDOWNE/PETTY-FITZMAURICE, Charles Hope, GG Post 5
    FITZMAURICE/PETTY-FITZMAURICE, Edward Norman 3IG Post 5
    PRESTON, Stephen Edward Thomas, 1IG, Post 39
    PRESON/GORMANSTON, Jenico William Richard, KOYLI, Post 39

    RHYS-WILLIAMS, Glyn David, 3WG, Post 88
    RODNEY, George William, RAFVR, Post 81

    SALTOUN/FRASER, Alexander Simon, 6GG, Post 26
    SHUTTLEWORTH, Richard Ughtred Paul, RAFVR, Posts 73, 79 & 83
    SHUTTLEWORTH, Ronald Orlando Lawrence, 138 Field Reg, RA, Post 73
    SPERLING, Philip Rowland, WG, Post 89
    STRANG STEEL, James Malcolm, 6GG, Post 38
    BRODRICK/STEWART-MACKENZIE, Michael Victor, 3CG, Posts 32, 36 & 91
    BRODRICK/STEWART-MACKENZIE, Francis Alan, RA, Post 33
    STRUTT, C.V. Michael, RCAF, Posts 106 & 107
    ALINGTON/STURT, Napier George Henry, RAFVR, Post 63

    TRENCHARD, Hugh, 6GG Post 38

    VESTEY, William Howarth, SG, Posts 58, 59 & 60
    DES VOEUX, William Richard De B. 156 Para, Posts 27 & 48

    ARUNELL of WARDOUR, John, 2 Wilts, Post 109
    WELLESLEY, Henry Valerian George, D of Wellington/2 Commando, Post 35
    WHISKARD, Richard Geoffrey, WG, Post 90
    WIGRAM, Francis Clive, 6GG, Posts 28, 34 & 37
    CONNAUGHT AND STRATHEARN/WINDSOR, Arthur William Patrick Albert, Post 67
    CONNAUGHT AND STRATHEARN/WINDSOR, Alistair Arthur Duff, RHG, Post 69
    WINDSOR, George Edward Alexander Edmund, RAF, Posts 103 & 107
    WINN, Anthony Edmund, 11 Kings R Rifle Corps, Post 99
     
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  4. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    Perished in same crash as Duke of Kent:

    Lieutenant JOHN ARTHUR LOWTHER, M.V.O., H.M.S. President., Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve who died age 32 on 25 August 1942

    Son of the Hon. Christopher William Lowther and of Ina Marjorie Gwendolen Lowther, O.B.E. (nee Pelly); husband of Priscilla Lowther (nee Lambert); grandson of the Right Hon. James William Lowther, 1st Viscount Ullswater, P.C., G.C.B., J.P., LL.M., D.L., D.C.L.(Oxon.), LL.D. (Cantab.), D.C.L.(Leeds), of Campsea Ashe.
Remembered with honour CAMPSEA ASHE (OR CAMPSEY ASH) (ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST) CHURCHYARD
    CWGC :: Casualty Details
     

    Attached Files:

  5. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    Another victim of the crash:

    Pilot Officer THE HON. C. V. MICHAEL STRUTT J/15062, 228 (R.A.F.) Sqdn, Royal Canadian Air Force who died age 28 on 25 August 1942
Son of Algernon Henry Strutt, 3rd Baron Belper and of Lady Belper (nee Bruce), of Kingston-on-Soar; husband of the Hon. Mrs. C. V. Michael Strutt.
Remembered with honour KINGSTON-ON-SOAR (ST. WINIFREDS) CHURCHYARD
    CWGC :: Casualty Details
     

    Attached Files:

  6. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    From The Irish Times, Wednesday, August 26, 1942:

    DUKE OF KENT KILLED
    FLYING BOAT CRASH IN SCOTLAND

    The Duke of Kent was killed yesterday afternoon when a Sunderland plane in which he was proceeding to Iceland crashed in the North of Scotland. All the crew of the flying-boat also lost their lives.

    The following message was sent out at midnight:-
    "The Air Ministry deeply regrets to announce that Air Commodore H.R.H. the Duke of Kent was killed on active service this afternoon when a Sunderland flying boat crashed in the North of Scotland.

    "His Royal Highness, who was attached to the staff of Inspector-General of the Royal Air Force, was proceeding to Iceland on duty.

    "All the crew of the aircraft also lost their lives."

    DUKE'S CAREER
    Prince George Edward Alexander Edmund, youngest brother of the King, was born on December 20, 1902. His father wished him to carry on the family tradition of a "sailor prince," and accordingly Prince George entered the Royal Naval Training College at Dartmouth a few months before his 14th birthday. He passed out as a Midshipman in 1921, and spent eight years as a serving officer, seeing service with the Mediterranean and Atlantic Fleets, the China Squadron and on the America and West Indies Station. Ill-health and a not over-strong constitution forced him, much against his own wish, to relinquish a Naval career in March, 1929.

    He was attached to the Foreign Office to gain knowledge of the administration and work of a Department of State. Thus, Prince George became the first Civil Servant in the Royal Family. His duties at the Foreign Office were undertaken, it was understood, with a view to fitting him for the position of Governor-General of one of the Dominions, and the intention was that he should afterwards gain experience in other Government departments. Ill-health, however, again interfered with his plans, and in July, 1929, he was given indefinite leave of absence from the Foreign Office owing to digestive troubles.

    After visiting Norway, in December, 1930, to represent the King and Queen at the celebrations of the 25th anniversary of King Haakon's accession, the Duke - he was still Prince George - set out on one of the greatest adventures he had undertaken - his 18,000 mile tour of South America with the then Prince of Wales.

    On his return he made a series of tours of industrial Britain. Early in 1934 he made a 21,000 mile tour of of South Africa, Rhodesia, the Belgian Congo and the Portuguese territory at Lobito Bay. This was to have been followed by a visit to Australia for the Victoria centenary celebrations, but it was felt that the strain would be too great, notwithstanding that his physique had, so far, improved that in South Africa he climbed Table Mountain. Instead of going to Australia he went to Yugoslavia, a visit which culminated in the announcement in August of his betrothal to Princess Marina. A month before his marriage he became, Duke of Kent, Baron Downpatrick and Earl of St. Andrews.

    MARRIAGE
    The Duke and Duchess of Kent were married in November, 1934. Very soon after her arrival in Britain the beautiful young bride of King George the Fifth's youngest son had endeared herself to the people of Britain, and the news of the engagement was welcomed throughout the country.

    Princess Marina was the youngest daughter of Prince and Princess Nicholas of Greece. The marriage, in November, 1934, was the outstanding social event of the year and aroused enormous public interest. The ceremony in Westminster Abbey was broadcast throughout the Empire, North and South America and Europe. There are three children of the marriage - Prince Edward, born in October, 1935; Princess Alexandra, born on Christmas Day, 1936, and Prince Michael George Charles Franklin, born on Independence Day (July 4) this year. President Roosevelt is one of the godfathers of the baby prince.

    FLEW THE ATLANTIC
    In 1938 the Duke was chosen to succeed Lord Gowrie as Governor-General of Australia, the appointment to take effect from November, 1939, however, caused an alteration of the plan.

    The Duke of Kent was probably the most air-minded member of the Royal Family, and its first member to fly the Atlantic. He had flown thousands of miles under war conditions, in a 'plane equipped for battle with enemy aircraft. For some time he had been making extensive but little publicised air trips.

    The Duke, who was a group captain in the R.A.F., relinquished the rank of Air Vice-Marshal in 1940, when he joined, so that he should not be senior to experienced officers, with whom he had to work in his capacity of welfare officer. It was in July last year that he made a secret flight to Canada in a Liberator - four-engine American bomber - to inspect the Empire air-training school, where thousands of young men from Britain and the Empire are preparing to join in the R.A.F. offensive. The crossing took eight hours. He first landed at Montreal and then flew on to Ottawa in another 'plane.

    WAR DUTIES
    The Duke filled every moment of his time after the outbreak of war in the performance of a variety of official duties and personal visits to war victims, wounded, bombed and others. Many times he has been in personal danger. Only a week ago while staying in a south coast town it was bombed and machine-gunned. In November, 1940, German shells from the French coastal batteries fell in Dover during his visit.

    Late in 1941 he visited Service establishments in Northern Ireland, met crews of convoy-escorting destroyers and corvettes in the North-West.

    No official announcement has yet been made concerning Court mourning. The last time the Court went into mourning was for the Duke of Connaught, and the period was fifteen days.

    From The Irish Times, Thursday, August 27, 1942:
    SURVIVOR FROM DUKE'S WRECKED 'PLANE
    FOUND WANDERING ON THE MOUNTAINSIDE

    More than twenty-four hours after the Sunderland flying-boat carrying the Duke of Kent had crashed on a lonely hillside in the North of Scotland came the news last night that there was one survivor of the accident.

    He is Flight-Sergeant Andrew Simpson Wilson Jack, aged about 24, of Grangemouth, Scotland, and was rear-gunner in the 'plane. He was thrown clear when the 'plane hit the hillside and was not seriously hurt, although he was burned on the face, arms and legs.

    Stunned and semi-conscious, he wandered away from the scene of the crash before searchers arrived. For ten hours he staggered through the heather until crofters found him and took him to a village, where his wounds were tended. Yesterday afternoon he was taken to hospital suffering from bruises and burns on his face and back. It was then that it became known that there had been a survivor. Previously it had been officially stated that all the crew and passengers, said to number 15, perished.

    Three farmers were the first to locate the crashed 'plane, which was ablaze on the desolate mountainside, 60 miles from the seaplane base where the ill-fated flight to Iceland had commenced. Some bodies were found in the wreckage badly burned, and others had been throw clear and had died from their injuries. First news of the accident came from a farmer, David Morrison, and his son, Hugh, who were out searching for sheep. They heard the 'plane hovering overhead and then came the muffled sound of an explosion as it crashed into the mountainside. Hugh Morrison went on a motor-cycle for medical aid and to inform the police, and a search party was formed by farmers and military personnel. A doctor was taken to the scene, and, later, police and ambulances arrived.

    It was some time before the bodies could be removed owing to the difficult nature of the place. Among the victims were Lieutenant John Lowther, R.N.V.R., the Duke's private secretary, who was grandson and heir to Viscount Ullswater, former speaker of the House of Commons; the Hon. Michael Strutt, son of Lord Belper and brother of the Duchess of Norfolk, and Leading Aircraftman Hales, the Duke's valet. Mr. Lowther, who had been the Duke's secretary for seven years, travelled to Scotland by train on Tuesday with the Duke's party. Mr. Strutt, who was 28, was taking the place of Squadron Leader D.J. Ferguson, who was prevented by illness from accompanying the Duke to Iceland. The final decision to visit Iceland was made early this week, and the King's permission had to be obtained.

    DUKE'S HEIR
    It is not certain that the Duke's heir, Prince Edward, will become Duke of Kent, for Royal Dukedoms are usually bestowed by the King on one person and do not descend. The Duke was expected to stay in Iceland for about ten days. The Lord Chamberlain announced yesterday that the Court will go into mourning for four weeks from yesterday until September 23. The Duke's body, which was first laid with his dead comrades. will be brought to London.

    DUKE'S FUNERAL
    Although no definite arrangements have so far been made for the funeral, it is almost certain that it will take place in St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, with military honours. The Duchess of Kent yesterday morning left Coppins, Iver, the country home of the Duke and Duchess. A Memorial Service is expected to be arranged at the village church of Iver.

    The Duke of Abercorn, Governor of Northern Ireland, in a telegram to the King, said: "His Royal Highness's visits to Northern Ireland have been a source of inspiration to us all, and have left happy memories behind." The Governor also sent telegrams of sympathy to the Duchess of Kent and to Queen Mary.

    Mr. J.M. Andrews, Prime Minister of Northern Ireland, sent messages of sympathy to the King and to the Duchess of Kent and Queen Mary. Speaking in the Northern Parliament, Mr. Andrews said: "The Duke of Kent died in the service of his country. When the Duke walked through the bombed areas of Belfast, making personal contact with the people who had lost their dear ones and their homes, he struck a chord that will never cease to vibrate in their hearts."

    Messages of sympathy have been received from all parts of the world, especially from the United States. President Roosevelt has sent messages of condolence to Queen Mary, the King and the Duchess of Kent, the White House announced yesterday.

    From The Irish Times, Friday, August 28, 1942:
    DUKE'S BODY TAKEN TO WINDSOR
    TO LIE IN ROYAL CHAPEL

    The body of the Duke of Kent was brought south by train last night from Scotland, and will lie in the Albert Memorial Chapel, Windsor Castle, until the funeral at Windsor. The train, travelling from the north of Scotland, made a special stop at a small highland village in the morning to allow the coffin to be placed in it. During the night it had remained at Dunrobin Castle, Highland home of the Duke of Sutherland, after having been carried down the hillside, where the 'plane crash occurred, and across miles of rough moor to a waiting ambulance.

    The King and Queen returned to London yesterday from the country, their brief holiday cut short by the Duke's death. The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester accompanied them. The Duchess of Kent has not left her country home, The Coppins, at Iver, Bucks, where yesterday messages of condolence from the Duke's friends continued to reach her.

    The train conveying the Duke's coffin also bore those of Lieut. John Lowther, R.N.V.R., pilot officer; the Hon. Michael Strutt, and L.A.C. Hales, the Duke's valet. Lieut.-Col. the Hon. Sir Piers Legh, Master of the King's Household, travelled with the train.

    The bodies of three airmen killed in the crash also began their journeys south by train yesterday morning. An R.A.F. escort accompanied the remains to the station. Flight-Sergeant Andrew Jack, of Grangemouth, Scotland, passed a comfortable nigh in the Scottish hospital, where he is being treated for burns and other injuries.

    The Funeral Service for the Duke of Kent will take place in St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

    EIRE'S MESSAGE
    The Irish Government has sent to King George a message of sympathy, the Irish Times learned last night.

    From The Times, Monday, Aug 31, 1942:
    FUNERAL OF THE DUKE OF KENT
    SERVICE IN ST. GEORGE'S CHAPEL

    The funeral of the Duke of Kent, as recorded in the Court Circular, took place at St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, on Saturday morning, and was attended by the King and Queen, Queen Mary, many members of the Royal Family, the King of Norway, the King of the Hellenes, the Queen of the Netherlands, and the King of Yugoslavia. The Duchess of Kent, like the other ladies of the Royal Family, occupied a seat in the Choir. She entered the Choir just before the service began, accompanied by the Queen and Queen Mary.

    The coffin had rested overnight in the Albert Memorial Chapel, and the service opened with the procession bringing the coffin into St. George's Chapel. The procession was led by the choir, the canons and minor canons, and the Dean of Windsor, followed by Lieutenant-Colonel Humprey Butler and Captain Lord Herbert, carrying insignia, and the Earl of Clarendon, Lord Chamberlain. The coffin covered with the standard of the Duke was borne by eight n.c.o.s of the R.A.F., and on it were two wreaths, one from the King and Queen and one from the Duchess of Kent. After the royal mourners came Lord Wigram (Deputy Constable and Lieutenant-Governor of Windsor Castle) and the suites in attendance.

    The procession passed down the north aisle into the Nave, where bluejackets and marines lined the north side, men of the Royal Fusiliers and The Royal West Kent Regiment to the west, and the R.A.F to the south side. To the singing of the opening sentences of the Burial Service to Croft's setting and the hymn "Abide with Me," it passed up the north aisle of the Nave, down the centre, and into the Choir. The hymn was followed by the singing of Psalm xxiii, and Canon Anthony Deane read the Lesson, the first verses of St. John xiv. Before the committal the hymn "God of the Living" was sung. As the coffin was lowered into the vault the King cast ashes on the coffin from a silver bowl.

    After the closing Collects and the Blessing and the singing of "God be in my head," Sir Gerald Wollaston, Garter King of Arms, proclaimed the styles and titles of his late Royal Highness. Last Post and Reveille, sounded by trumpeters of the R.A.F., then ended the service. The King passed by the side of the open vault and stood waiting for the Queen and the Duchess of Kent and Queen Mary, with whom he walked from the Choir. The other mourners filed past the vault and out into the cloisters, while Dr. W.H. Harris played, by the special wish of the Duchess, and Intermezzo by Sinding and Chopin's Funeral March.

    MEMORIAL SERVICE AT IVER
    The Duchess of Kent, attended by Lady Herbert, was present at a memorial service for the Duke of Kent, which was held at St. Peter's, Iver, yesterday. The Bishop of Buckingham officiated, assisted by the Rev. D. Creighton, and the service included Psalm xxiii and the hymn "On the Resurrection morning."

    The large congregation, in which there were many villagers, included representatives of local organizations, of the Police, headed by the Chief Constable of Buckinghamshire, of the Civil Defence, of the National Fire Service, of Iver Hospital, and of the Grand Lodge of Freemasons.

    From The Times, Monday, September 7, 1942:
    QUESTIONS IN THE COMMONS
    THE DUKE OF KENT'S AIR ACCIDENT
    From our Parliamentary Correspondent

    When the House of Commons reassembles Sir Ralph Glyn is to put a question to the Secretary of State for Air about the flying accident in which the late Duke of Kent and those who were accompanying him lost their lives. Sir Archibald Sinclair will be asked:-

    "If the Air Ministry has ordered a court of inquiry into the accident to the Sunderland aircraft conveying his late Royal Highness the Duke of Kent on passage to Iceland; and whether, in view of all the circumstances, the composition of the crew, the weather conditions and time of day, he will undertake to publish the findings and thus allay public anxiety on the grounds that proper care was not exercised."

    This is one of 257 oral questions which will be put to Ministers at the next series of sittings ...

    From The Times, Tuesday, September 15, 1942:
    THE KING WHERE DUKE OF KENT WAS KILLED

    The King yesterday visited the scene of the air crash in which his brother, the Duke of Kent, was killed. After tramping across the rough Scottish hillside, the King, with officers of the R.A.F. in attendance, examined the spot where the Sunderland flying-boat crashed into the hillside.

    Members of the search party which went out to the wrecked aircraft were presented to the King. He had long talks with each of them, including Mr. David Morrison, farmer, and his son Hugh, who were the first to know of the accident, and the local doctor, who identified the Duke. The King asked about the finding of all 15 victims of the crash, and before he left made special inquiries about the progress of Flight Sergeant Jack, the only survivor.

    From The Times, October 8, 1942:
    THE DUKE OF KENT'S DEATH
    FLYING-BOAT ON WRONG COURSE

    The result of the inquiry into the accident to the Sunderland aircraft flying to Iceland in which the late Duke of Kent was a passenger was made public yesterday in a written reply to a Parliamentary question by Sir Ralph Glyn. Sir Archibald Sinclair, Secretary of State for Air, stated:-

    The circumstances in which the tragic accident occurred have now been investigated by a Royal Air Force Court of Inquiry, and the sequence of events was as follows:-

    The aircraft, which was proceeding from a Royal Air Force station in Scotland to Iceland, was airborne just after 1 o'clock in the afternoon of August 15. Before departure, the correct procedure for briefing the captain as to the exact route to be followed and for providing full information about the weather conditions likely to be encountered, was complied with. Local weather conditions were not good at the time of the take-off, but the general indications showed a likelihood of improvement to the westward.

    The captain of the aircraft was a flying-boat pilot of long experience on the particular type of aircraft which he was flying that day, and of exceptional ability.

    About half an hour after take-off the aircraft was heard approaching land from the sea at what appeared to be a low height, and shortly afterwards it was heard to crash into the hills.

    The Court found: - First, that the accident occurred because the aircraft was flown on a track other than that indicated in the flight plan given to the pilot, and at too low an altitude to clear the rising ground on the track.

    Secondly, that the responsibility for this serious mistake in airmanship lies with the captain of the aircraft.

    Thirdly, that the weather encountered should have presented no difficulties to an experienced pilot.

    Fourthly, that the examination of the propellers showed that the engines were under power when the aircraft struck the ground; and,

    Fifthly, in accordance with K.R. & A.C.I., paragraph 1325, that all the occupants of the aircraft were on duty at the time of the accident.

    The Chief Inspector of Accidents is in agreement with the findings of the Court.


    The Duke's Valet:
    Leading Aircraftman
    JOHN WALTER HALES 927117, 228 Sqdn., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve who died age 25 on 25 August 1942
    
Husband of Vera Joan Hales, of Littlethorpe, Yorkshire.

    Remembered with honour INGHAM (HOLY TRINITY) CHURCHYARD
    CWGC :: Casualty Details
     
  7. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

  8. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

  9. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Royal Horse Guards attd. 12th Royal Lancers., Royal Armoured Corps

    :poppy: CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]

    From 12 Lancers War Diary dated 23rd May 1940.

    Early in the morning orders were received for a reported enemy penetration in the area of St. Omer to be verified and A Sqn was despatched to report on the situation in the area. Maj. A.M. Horsbrugh-Porter reported that there was only a few RE's and RA batteries in the area; and the enemy had infact been able to cross in the area of Renescure H1950, and that he had been asked to counter-attack the enemy to enable the RE's to withdraw from Renescure and to enable a battery to be recovered. The CO gave permission for this attack to be made, and A Sqn counter-attacked the enemy infantry on the high ground to the North and NW of Renescure, inflicted a number of casualties and held up their advance sufficiently long for the guns to withdraw.

    It was during this attack that 2/Lt. ATG Roddick was unfortunately killed at Lynde , and Maj. Lord Erne, who was attached to the Regt and acting as 2nd in Cmd of A Sqn, so severly wounded by A.Tk gun fire from the rear that he died of his wounds.
     
  10. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Just before my last trip to Italy to visit Coriano Ridge Cemetery - Gerry Chester called to ask if I would photograph both his CO - Baron O'Neil and Squadron commander - Major MacKean...who had both lost their lives after the Gothic LIne Battle in the October of 1944 -which I did and he was happy to post them in his History of the North Irish Horse's activities in Italy...
    Cheers
     

    Attached Files:

    dbf likes this.
  11. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Flying Officer RICHARD LAURENCE GRENVILLE BOWYER

    123153, 226 Sqdn., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
    who died age 22
    on 29 January 1943
    Son of George Edward Wentworth Bowyer, M.C., D.L., 1st Baron Denham, and Lady Denham, of Weston Underwood, Buckinghamshire.
    Remembered with honour
    RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
     

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  12. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Sergeant THE HON. INGELRAM IVO TWISLETON-WYKEHAM-FIENNES

    1169866, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
    who died age 19
    on 30 August 1941
    Son of Ivo Murray Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes, 20th Baron Saye and Sele, and Lady (Hersey Cecilia Hester) Saye and Sele, of Banbury, Oxfordshire.
    Remembered with honour
    RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
     

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  13. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Wing Commander MICHAEL LISTER ROBINSON
    D S O, D F C

    37300, Royal Air Force
    who died age 25
    on 10 April 1942
    Croix d Guerre (Belgium) avec Palme. Son of Roy Lister Robinson, 1st Baron Robinson of Kielder Forest and of Adelaide, and Lady Robinson, of Mayfair, London.
    Remembered with honour
    RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
     

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  14. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Squadron Leader The Hon. FELIX HUGH LAWRENCE SCARLETT
    D F C

    88712, 183 Sqdn., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
    who died age 24
    on 12 July 1944
    Son of Lt.-Col. Hugh Richard Scarlett, D.S.O., J.P., 7th Baron Abinger, and Marjorie, Baroness Abinger, of Inverlochy Castle, Inverness-shire.
    Remembered with honour
    RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
     

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  15. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER

    To keep Aristocracy deaths together, this lad should also be here. See the link below for his full story.

    http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/war-air/27756-pilot-officer-hon-peter-george-alex-st-clair-erskine.html#post307367

    In Memory of
    Pilot Officer The Hon. PETER GEORGE ALEX. ST. CLAIR-ERSKINE

    111 Sqdn., Royal Air Force
    who died
    on 08 September 1939
    Son of Anthony Hugh Francis Harry St. Clair-Erskine, 6th Earl of Rosslyn, and of the Countess Rosslyn (nee Chisholm), of St. John's Wood, London.
    Remembered with honour
    ROSSLYN (ST. MATTHEW) CHAPELYARD
     
  16. Buteman

    Buteman 336/102 LAA Regiment (7 Lincolns), RA

    Name: DAVIES, DAVID
    Rank: Major
    Regiment/Service: Royal Welch Fusiliers
    Unit Text: 7th Bn., attd. 6th Bn.
    Age: 29
    Date of Death: 25/09/1944
    Service No: 87746
    Additional information: 2nd Baron Davies of Llandinam. Son of David Davies, 1st Baron, of Llandinam, and of Mrs. David Davies; husband of Lady (Ruth Eldrydd) Davies, of Llandinam, Montgomeryshire. B.A.
    Grave/Memorial Reference: I. D. 7.
    Cemetery: VALKENSWAARD WAR CEMETERY

    LORD DAVIES OF LLANDINHAM.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2017
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    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    Grand nephews of Field Marshal Alan Francis Brooke, 1st Viscount Alanbrooke:

    Lieutenant BASIL JULIAN DAVID BROOKE 200083, 6th Bn., Grenadier Guards who died age 22 on 11 March 1943
    
Son of Capt. the Rt. Hon. Sir Basil Stanlake Brooke, P.C., C.B.E., M.C., D.L., M.P., 5th Bt., Prime Minister of Northern Ireland, and Lady Brooke (nee Sergison), of Brookeborough, Co. Fermanagh, Northern Ireland.

    Remembered with honour SFAX WAR CEMETERY
    Grave/Memorial Reference: VII. D. 8.
    CWGC :: Casualty Details


    thePeerage.com - Person Page 18122
    Lieutenant Basil Julian David Brooke b. 18 April 1920, d. March 1943

    Lieutenant Basil Julian David Brooke was born on 18 April 1920. He was the son of Basil Stanlake Brooke, 1st Viscount Brookeborough and Cynthia Mary Sergison. He died in March 1943 at age 22, killed in action.

    Lieutenant Basil Julian David Brooke was educated at Eton College, Eton, Berkshire, England. He gained the rank of Lieutenant in the service of the Grenadier Guards. He fought in the Second World War.

    From The Grenadier Guards in the War of 1939-1945, Nicholson, pg 297:
    It was only after the battle [Medenine] that the Grenadier suffered any severe loss. Two officers, Lieutenants H.J. TUFNELL and B.J.D. BROOKE, were killed outright when the jeep in which they were patrolling ran over a mine. Their bodies were recovered by Lieut. The Lord Brabourne and a party of volunteers.
    [see post 16 of this thrad for details about Brabourne]

    From The Times, Mar 27, 1943:
    Lieutenant BASIL JULIAN BROOKE, Grenadier Guards, who has been killed in action at the age of 23, was the eldest son of Sir Basil Brook, Bt., M.C., M.P., Northern Ireland Minister of Commerce and Production, and Lady Brooke, of Colebrooke, Brookeborough, Co. Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. Born on April 18, 1920, he was educated at Winchester and at Cambridge, and before joining the Army he was for a time with the York Stree Flax Spinning Company, Belfast. He was grand-nephew of General Sir Alan Brooke, Chief of the Imperial General Staff.
    --

    Lieutenant HENRY ALAN BROOKE M.C., 259934, "A" Sqn. 10th Royal Hussars, Royal Armoured Corps who died age 21 on 17 April 1945

    Son of Capt. the Rt. Hon. Basil Stanlake Brooke, 1st Viscount Brookeborough, P.C., C.B.E., M.C., 10th Royal Hussars, and of the Viscountess Brookeborough (nee Sergison), of Brookeborough, Northern Ireland.

    Remembered with honour RAVENNA WAR CEMETERY
    Grave/Memorial Reference: I. C. 29.
    CWGC :: Casualty Details


    thePeerage.com - Person Page 18146
    Lieutenant Henry Alan Brooke b. 29 October 1923, d. April 1945

    Lieutenant Henry Alan Brooke was born on 29 October 1923. He was the son of Basil Stanlake Brooke, 1st Viscount Brookeborough and Cynthia Mary Sergison. He died in April 1945 at age 21 at Italy, killed in action.

    Lieutenant Henry Alan Brooke was educated at Eton College, Eton, Berkshire, England. He gained the rank of Lieutenant in the service of the 10th Hussars. He fought in the Second World War. He was decorated with the award of Military Cross (M.C.).

    His MC recommendation [WO373/10/-ir1310-pg59&60]

    2nd Armoured Brigade, 1st Armoured Division, 5 Corps
    259934 War Substantive Lieutenant HENRY ALAN BROOKE, 10th ROYAL HUSSARS

    On September 23rd 1944 "A" Squadron 10th ROYAL HUSSARS were in support of the 2/8th GURKHA RIFLES in their attack across the River MARECCHIO on to the S. ARCHANGELO feature.

    The Infantry captured their objective at first light, but the Squadron found great difficulty in negotiating the river crossing and subsequent waterways. The Infantry were in danger of counter-attack by enemy tanks and in view of the heavy shell-fire and bad going over the river were unable to get any of their supporting weapons forward.

    Lieutenant BROOKE commanded the leading troop of the squadron and due to his personal initiative by making a recce on foot he was able to get his two leading tanks across a small bridge, which collapsed when the third was crossing.

    He then set about making a crossing with balks of timber which was successful in that it allowed the rest of the Squadron to pass over the obstacle.

    By this time the enemy had observed where the crossing had been made and brought down heavy mortar fire. Lieutenant BROOKE, undaunted, took his troop on to the objective and remained there throughout the day. The Infantry were forced back off the objective due to such heavy shelling and mortaring and the threat of enemy tanks.

    Lieutenant BROOKE and his troop remained there and he himself actually engaged a TIGER tank, scoring two direct hits on the front, but failed to knock it out, but no doubt prevented any further enemy tanks over-running the Infantry.

    In the evening the Infantry re-occupied the positions in front and around Lieutenant BROOKE's troop. Lieutenant BROOKE was himself wounded in the head during these operations, and had to be evacuated at night. No doubt by his courage, efficiency and steadiness in the face of enemy he prevented the enemy from over-running completely the Infantry's objective.

    Recommended for Immediate M.C.
    LG 08/03/45


    --
    thePeerage.com - Person Page 18146
    The middle of the 3 brothers survived the war:

    John Warden Brooke, 2nd Viscount Brookeborough b. 9 November 1922, d. 5 March 1987

    John Warden Brooke, 2nd Viscount Brookeborough was born on 9 November 1922. He was the son of Basil Stanlake Brooke, 1st Viscount Brookeborough and Cynthia Mary Sergison. He married Rosemary Hilda Chichester, daughter of Lt.-Col. Arthur O'Neill Cubitt Chichester and Hilda Grace Young, on 4 March 1949. He died on 5 March 1987 at age 64.

    John Warden Brooke, 2nd Viscount Brookeborough was educated at Eton College, Eton, Berkshire, England. He gained the rank of Captain in the service of the 10th Hussars. He fought in the Second World War, where he was wounded. He was Aide-de-Camp to the Viceroy of India in 1946. He held the office of High Sheriff of County Fermanagh in 1955. He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Lisnaskea [Northern Ireland] between 1968 and 1972. He held the office of Parliamentary Secretary, Minister of Commerce [Northern Ireland] in 1969. He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) [Northern Ireland] in 1971. He succeeded to the title of 2nd Viscount Brookeborough, of Colebrooke, co. Fermanagh [U.K., 1952] on 18 August 1973. He succeeded to the title of 6th Baronet Brooke, of Colebrooke, co. Fermanagh [U.K., 1822] on 18 August 1973.
     

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  18. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Attached Files:

  19. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Flight Lieutenant THE HON. BRUCE DAVID GRIMSTON
    D F C

    80850, 524 Sqdn., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
    who died age 28
    on 13 July 1944
    Son of James Walter Grimston, fourth Earl of Verulam, and Violet Constance Maitland Grimston (nee Brabazon), Countess of Verulam.
    Remembered with honour
    RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
     

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  20. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    Lieutenant BASIL MALISE BROOKE 177327, 11th Hussars, Royal Armoured Corps who died age 22 on 04 March 1944

    Son of Rear Admiral Sir Basil Vernon Brooke, G.C.V.O., and Lady Brooke (nee Cunninghame Graham), of Paddington, London; husband of Agnes Mary Brooke, of Paddington.

    Remembered with honour STREATHAM PARK CEMETERY
    Grave/Memorial Reference: Screen Wall. Square 23. Grave 44790.
    CWGC :: Casualty Details

    thePeerage.com - Person Page 18143
    Lieutenant Basil Malise Brooke b. 4 May 1921, d. 4 March 1944

    Lieutenant Basil Malise Brooke was born on 4 May 1921. He was the son of Rear-Admiral Sir Basil Vernon Brooke and Olave Barbara Clementina Cunninghame Graham. He married Ann Mary Bateson, daughter of Cecil W. Bateson, on 5 September 1941. He died on 4 March 1944 at age 22, while on active service.

    Lieutenant Basil Malise Brooke fought in the Second World War. He gained the rank of Lieutenant in the service of the 11th Hussars (Prince Albert's Own).
    thePeerage.com - Person Page 18142
    Rear-Admiral Sir Basil Vernon Brooke b. 9 March 1876, d. 11 December 1945

    Rear-Admiral Sir Basil Vernon Brooke was born on 9 March 1876. He was the son of Arthur Basil Brooke and Alice Georgina Norton. He married Olave Barbara Clementina Cunninghame Graham, daughter of Commander Charles Elphinstone Fleming Cunninghame Graham, on 26 August 1915. He died on 11 December 1945 at age 69.

    Rear-Admiral Sir Basil Vernon Brooke gained the rank of Rear-Admiral in the service of the Grand Fleet. He fought in the First World War. He was commander of the Royal Yacht Alexandra before 1922. He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Royal Victorian Order (G.C.V.O.). He held the office of Treasurer of the Household. He held the office of Groom-in-Waiting and Extra Equerry to King George VI between 1937 and 1945.

    Child of Rear-Admiral Sir Basil Vernon Brooke and Olave Barbara Clementina Cunninghame Graham
    Lieutenant Basil Malise Brooke b. 4 May 1921, d. 4 Mar 1944
     

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