Bravest act on the Allied side.

Discussion in 'General' started by The Aviator, Dec 3, 2007.

  1. The Aviator

    The Aviator Discharged

    Here is my nomination for the bravest act of World War 2 on the Allied side.
    Sub Lieutenant John Moffet RN.

    [Does anyone have a photo of John Moffet I can add please?]


    The Royal Navy's week long chase of the formidable German battleship Bismarck culminated in the foul evening weather of 26th May 1941. Despite the deck of HMS Ark Royal pitching through 55 feet, S/Lt John Moffat was one of fifteen Swordfish pilots who took off to attack Bismarck. After 90
    minutes of arduous and turbulent flying the Swordfish found their quarry and dived through the intense anti-aircraft fire to drop their torpedoes. One of these hit and jammed Bismarcks rudder and condemned the battleship to sail in slow circles. The Royal Navys own capital ships then closed in and pounded Bismarck into a burning wreck.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

  3. The Aviator

    The Aviator Discharged

    Yes Owen, the second one. Is there a problem?
     
  4. kfz

    kfz Very Senior Member

    Not really a single act of braver,y its easier to be loose with other mens lives, but this


    HMSGLOWWORM


    Kev
     
  5. The Aviator

    The Aviator Discharged

    Kev, he got the Bismark with that act of bravery.
    That single act had far reaching consequences on the outcome of the war.

    For England it was a desperately needed morale booster for a country on the ropes after losing the Hood to a single shot, not to mention virtually the Battle of the Atlantic to that date and the BEF in Europe fiasco at Dunkirk.

    For Germany it meant the virtual end of their surface navy as it was the last straw for Hitler.

    I think an act of bravery can be largely amplified when it does so much for the country of the person involved.
     
  6. deadb_tch

    deadb_tch the deadliest b#tch ever

    Just my opinion, but this is theme without end - every soldier on every theatre of war can be that man with bravest act, there were million+ of bravest acts in WW2 :)
     
    von Poop likes this.
  7. Gerard

    Gerard Seelow/Prora

    I'd nominate some of the Kriegsmarine who helped evacuate German Refugees from the Baltic Ports of East Prussia during the last days of the Reich. With no Air cover and virtually no anti-submarine cover, that surface fleet managed to evacuate close to 1 million people. Now thats bravery.

    You could also argue that the Bravest act of WW2 was Adolf's declaration of war on the USA but it would also qualify for the most STUPID!!!
     
  8. The Aviator

    The Aviator Discharged

    Just my opinion, but this is theme without end - every soldier on every theatre of war can be that man with bravest act, there were million+ of bravest acts in WW2 :)

    Your opinion counts DB.
    This is just a question on who YOU think carried out the bravest act.
    We all know that this can never be officially judged.
     
  9. The Aviator

    The Aviator Discharged

    I can see the nomination field seemed too wide. I have altered it to the Allied side only.
    My opinion still stands on what John Moffet did for his country is that it was the most outstanding achievement by a single act.
     
  10. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Yes Owen, the second one. Is there a problem?
    We have had website owners ask us to mention their sites when members post images that aren't their own.
    I too have been guilty of this in the past.
    We're just trying to keep the site on the right side of Copyright law if that is possible.
     
  11. deadb_tch

    deadb_tch the deadliest b#tch ever

    Your opinion counts DB.
    This is just a question on who YOU think carried out the bravest act.
    We all know that this can never be officially judged.

    Ok, here we go with such a bravest act. In my youth I've read some book at least 2 times - this book were about Aleksey Maresiev, a soviet pilot wich was shot by nazi pilot in winter of 1942, after unhappy landing he crowled (because of broken leg) 18 days to soviet front-line thru forests and fields of fights, avoiding meeting with germans and trying to stay alive without any food and no ammunition (only pistol). And he made it - got to soviet army. After such a journey he lost both legs by gangrene and probably could spent rest of his days in wheelchair drinking vodka and die from alcoholism BUT! he made artificial limb for his lost legs (after some period of testing modifications of them) and after this all he become a pilot again and ended war as a pilot. Of course he got Hero of Soviet Union star.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER Patron

    Speaking of acts of heroism, this example had it all.

    The 6 or 7? destroyers of Taffy 3 going up against Battleships and Cruisers in the Battle of Samar at Leyte in the Philippines.

    The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors

    With four destroyers and three destroyer escorts all that stood against four battleships, six heavy cruisers, and a dozen destroyers, the men of Taffy 3 did the only thing they could do - they fought to the death. The seven tiny escorts charged the Centre Force at full speed, riddling the enemy ships’ superstructures with five inch shells, launching torpedoes at ranges as close as 4,000 yards. The carriers of Taffy 3 launched their aircraft armed with whatever weapons were available, harassing the Japanese all morning to buy time for the carriers' escape. By 9:20 am, with reinforcements on the horizon, the Centre Force beat a hasty retreat back to San Bernadino Strait.

    This miraculous victory was not won without painful losses. Five of the 13 ships in Taffy 3 went to the bottom, including two escort carriers, two destroyers, and a destroyer escort. One of these, the St. Lo, was the first warship to fall victim to a kamikaze. More than 800 men died, a number of whom died in the sea after an error in communications delayed their rescue. For their sacrifice, the Centre Force never threatened the island of Leyte.
     
  13. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER Patron

    While it is difficult (impossible) to pick one act, there are those that stick in your mind.

    From: List of Australian winners of the Victoria Cross

    One of the amazing RAAF acts of bravery which resulted in a VC for:

    [​IMG]
    Australian Victoria Cross Winner
    [​IMG] Flight Sergeant Rawdon Hume Middleton

    Unit RAAF, attached to No. 149 Squadron RAF Born 22 July 1916 at Waverley, New South Wales Date of action 28-29 November 1942 Place Raid on Turin, Italy Details On his twenty-ninth sortie he was captain of Stirling BF372, an aircraft he had flown only once before. His gunners had all completed their tour of thirty operations but volunteered to stay with Middleton for his last two trips. On the outward journey Middleton experienced difficulty in climbing to the necessary altitude to cross the Alps. Once across he made three low-altitude flights over Turin so that the target could be identified. The aircraft was then subjected to fire from light anti-aircraft guns and a shell burst in the cockpit, shattering the windscreen and wounding both pilots. A piece of shell splinter tore into the side of Middleton’s face destroying his right eye and exposing the bone. The second pilot and wireless operator were also wounded. Middleton lost consciousness and the aircraft dived to 250 metres before control was regained by the second pilot who took the plane up to 500 metres and released the bombs.
    Middleton recovered consciousness, ordered the second pilot back to receive first aid, and set course for base. After discussing various alternatives Middleton decided to try and make the English coast so that his crew could leave the aircraft by parachute. He knew that he had little chance of saving himself. Four hours later, after an Alpine crossing, the French coast was reached and Middleton took evasive action when the aircraft was engaged by light anti-aircraft fire. After the plane had crossed the Channel it only had sufficient fuel for five minutes flying. Middleton ordered his crew to abandon the aircraft while he flew parallel with the coast for a few kilometres, after which he intended to head out to sea. Five of the crew left the aircraft safely while two remained to assist him. The aircraft crashed in the sea and the bodies of the front gunner and flight engineer were recovered the following day.
    Died Middleton’s body was washed ashore at Shakespeare Beach, Dover, on 1 February 1943. Buried or Commemorated St John’s Church, Mildenhall, Suffolk, England Current location of the VC Australian War Memorial
     
  14. sapper

    sapper WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Lt Arthur Heal RE. Croix de Geurre. 246 Field Company. Royal Engineers.
    Who in the company of two Sappers, and under very heavy fire, over a protracted period of time, crawled under the barbed wire and mine infested defences, that surrounded the huge "Hilliman" Enemy strongpoint to make a safe path through for the infantry.
    Then having achieved that, then proceeded to do it again for tanks.....
    Anyone in any doubt should have a look at what is left of "Hillman"
    To backup my suggestion the Hillman strongpoint was 650 meters by 450 meters in size FORMIDABLE!
    Sapper
     
  15. marcus69x

    marcus69x I love WW2 meah!!!

    After the plane had crossed the Channel it only had sufficient fuel for five minutes flying. Middleton ordered his crew to abandon the aircraft while he flew parallel with the coast for a few kilometres, after which he intended to head out to sea. Five of the crew left the aircraft safely while two remained to assist him. The aircraft crashed in the sea and the bodies of the front gunner and flight engineer were recovered the following day.


    A very brave man, thanx for that mate. One question though, why did he stay with the plane? Why not jump out with the rest once the plane was heading out to sea, and just leave the plane crash on it's own?

    marcus
     
  16. The Aviator

    The Aviator Discharged

    Uncountable acts of bravery occured. How does one judge them. Not possible is it?
     
  17. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER Patron

    A very brave man, thanx for that mate. One question though, why did he stay with the plane? Why not jump out with the rest once the plane was heading out to sea, and just leave the plane crash on it's own?

    marcus

    Possibly a better insight here Marcus:

    Middleton VC
     
  18. marcus69x

    marcus69x I love WW2 meah!!!

    Cheers Spidge.
     
  19. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Old Hickory Recon

    Uncountable acts of bravery occured. How does one judge them. Not possible is it?

    I agree with you Aviator. How do you quantify bravery on a scale? Surely not in numbers of other affected. I am certain no one gave a second thought if his selfless act would impact a few or a lot of people before engaging in it.

    Think of the numberless men who intentionally placed themselves on live explosives, knowing death would occur. How can you say that someone is less brave who enters into an action that has, for the most part, no likelyhood of survival than someone who stands a chance of survival?
     
  20. sapper

    sapper WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Right..There is no way to come up with the bravest acts. But often in the Sappers it is considered "not the thing" to talk about bravery and valour..... And folks I am deadly serious.

    I can think of many instances where outstanding bravery was shown. Where a sapper Sgt captured a bridge on his own, after driving off the enemy while they tried to join the firing points with a burst of Sten fire.
    What happend? A message came through "Those bloody sappers again" because we drove ahead into enemy territory. They were instructed to STOP! and let the infantry deal.
    Sapper
     

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