Battle of Britain poem.

Discussion in 'General' started by johnny sadiq, Feb 23, 2010.

  1. johnny sadiq

    johnny sadiq johnny sadiq

    I was a small child in London (later evacuated to Wales) when the Battle of Britain was fought and I grew up with the pilots of 'The Few' as my heroes and they still are. I resolved to be a pilot and became an airline pilot--retiring with just under 20,000 hours.
    I have written two books about my flying experiences, one of which was pronounced 'superbly written' by the British top selling aviation magazine, Fly Past.
    I also write poetry and I have written a poem about the Battle of Britain (a longish one) that I would very much like a veteran pilot who served in the Battle to read, but all attempts to contact them on the Internet have failed. I would be very grateful for any advice on this subject. I have tried the Battle of Britain website but al I received was a 'form email' (probably automatically generated) thanking me for my email.
    I am a 'new boy' on this web site and like the way it deals with my favourite subject:WW2.
    All the best,
    Johnny
     
  2. Gage

    Gage The Battle of Barking Creek

    Try posting it on here, Johnny. I bet we would all love to read it.
     
  3. johnny sadiq

    johnny sadiq johnny sadiq

    Thanks Gage, but it's 27 four line verses ---is that allowed?

    Johnny
     
  4. johnny sadiq

    johnny sadiq johnny sadiq

    Well, anyway here are the first three verses: (if there is no objection I'll post the whole poem--what does the webmaster think?)

    In every year there is a day,
    When grateful folk, their homage pay,
    Saluting them, the famous "Few,"
    And Spits and Hurris that they flew.

    It all began when France was lost,
    They waited for the mighty host
    Of Hitler's army to attack--
    A string of conquests at its back.

    All that remained, a strip of sea,
    To cross and have their victory
    With Britain' army spent from fray,
    The Wehrmacht soon would have its way.
     
  5. militarycross

    militarycross Very Senior Member

    Well, I'm looking forward to the next chapter of this poem.

    Give us the whole nine yards, please.

    cheers,
    phil
     
  6. nicks

    nicks Very Senior Member

    Well, I'm looking forward to the next chapter of this poem.

    Give us the whole nine yards, please.

    cheers,
    phil

    Ditto
     
  7. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    Well, I'm looking forward to the next chapter of this poem.

    Give us the whole nine yards, please.

    cheers,
    phil

    Johnny,

    I am with Phil having read the first installment.

    Regards
    Tom
     
  8. MyOldDad

    MyOldDad Senior Member

    Johnny,

    I am with Phil having read the first installment.

    Regards
    Tom

    Me too Johnny!
    Regards,
    Tom.
     
  9. Gage

    Gage The Battle of Barking Creek

    C'mon Johnny, don't stop now. Excellent stuff.
     
  10. johnny sadiq

    johnny sadiq johnny sadiq

    Right, Lads and Lasses--here it is (and it was written in gratitude to The Few)

    In every year there is a day,
    When grateful folk, their homage pay-
    Saluting them, the 'Famous Few,'
    And Spits and Hurris that they flew.

    It all began when France was lost,
    They waited for the mighty host,
    Of Hitler's Army to attack,
    A string of conquests at its back.

    All that remained, a strip of sea,
    To cross and have their victory.
    With Britain's Army spent from fray,
    The Wehrmacht soon would have its way

    "Invade them now!" Came Hitler's gloat,
    The English Channel's just a moat-
    If Britain's Navy shows its might
    Our planes will sink their ships on sight."

    The World stood by and held its breath.
    For most of Europe had seen death,
    And seen its freedom in sad loss
    To those who served 'The Crooked Cross.'

    But first they must control the air,
    Or else the Wehrmacht then would bear
    Great losses as they crossd the sea'
    And maybe cause that host to flee.

    Goering said: "We're six to one,
    My Jagds will have a little fun
    In shooting down that little band,
    The R.A.F--we'll take their land!"

    In August came the first advance,
    As bombers joined up over France
    Above them escort fighters flew,
    In eager groups, to meet 'The Few.'

    On England's airfields Merlins roared
    Defiance to the German horde.
    "The squadrons' airborne," came the cry.
    "We will not let them take our sky!"

    So Hurricane and Spitfire flew,
    And verily they were so few,
    When twelve against a hundred fought,
    To wrest the edge the Germans sought.

    Young fighter pilots eyes were wide,
    How could they stem that surging tide,
    Of planes with crosses, row on row?--
    The leaders called out: "Tally-Ho!"

    Dorniers, Heinkels, One-Oh-Nines,
    Came on, in their well drilled lines.
    Through their windsheilds pilots saw
    Huge numbers that held them in awe.

    But not for long were they in dread,
    "Attacking now!" their leaders said.
    They rolled their fighters in a dive
    And hoped that they would be alive--

    To once again join in the fray
    So they could fight again next day.
    The Brownings stuttered, spewing lead-
    "Get the bombers!" leaders said.

    Dorniers and Heinkels fell,
    As Hurricanes tore through, pell-mell.
    The careful lines of bombers broke,
    As some went down in flame and smoke.

    Down came the German fighters then,
    The One-Oh-Nine and Hundred and Ten,
    To make sure Hurricanes would fall--
    "Achtung Schpitfire!" came the call.

    Top cover Spitfires joined the fight,
    Breaking left and turning right,
    To duel with German fighters there-
    In that deadly piece of air.

    Fighters, bombers, round them fell,
    To blazing guns and cordite smell.
    Young men loyal to both sides die
    In this great battle in the sky.

    So this went on day in, day out,
    And though the pilots' hearts were stout
    To meet the Germans' every mission--
    Could they withstand this great attrition?

    Dowding's strategy was sound,
    With Sectors, Radar, firmly bound
    To fighter airfields in his plan.
    Pilots admired him to a man!

    The airfields then the Germans struck,
    In spite of combat with such pluck.
    Britain's fighter forces reeled
    To these attacks on fighters' field.

    Then came a heaven-sent respite,
    The Lufwaffe had turned its might,
    On LONDON--venting Hitler's rage
    That changed history's page.

    For due to German Leader's quirk,
    The One-Oh-Nines must do their work--
    Ten minutes o'er London Town
    Or lack of fuel would bring them down.

    That settled it, the tide was turned,
    As many Germans crashed and burned.
    'Adler Angriff' failed the test,
    The R.A.F. came off the best!

    Who were these men who came to fight,
    So young and keen with future bright.
    Came Britons, Belgians, Frenchmen too.
    U.S, Czechs,Poles, Canadians flew.

    So on September's fifteenth day,
    Look skyward, and to yourself say:
    "Thank you, thank you Gallant Few-
    We walk in freedom, thanks to you!"

    They fought so hard, that little band,
    And made such an inspiring stand--
    Caused Nazi banners to be furled
    By saving Britain....and the World!
     
    nicks and Gage like this.
  11. johnny sadiq

    johnny sadiq johnny sadiq

    Oops--sorry the line should read 'That changed history's bloody page'--too mush typing causes 'typos'--

    Johnny
     
  12. Gage

    Gage The Battle of Barking Creek

    Thanks for posting, Johnny. A great tribute and wonderful poem.
     
  13. nicks

    nicks Very Senior Member

    Excellent, thanks for posting.
     

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