Battle of Britain Day 15th September

Discussion in 'The War In The Air' started by Gage, Sep 15, 2012.

  1. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

  2. TTH

    TTH Senior Member

    There are two threads on this, should be merged.
     
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  3. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Sorted.
     
  4. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    15 SEPTEMBER 1940
    A week after their change of tactics, the Germans launched another massive assault on 15 September, which they believed would finally shatter Fighter Command’s resistance and open the way for a successful invasion. However, since 7 September Britain's defences had recovered, fighter production continued and operational pilot strength was the highest it had been since the start of the Battle of Britain.

    The German offensive came in two distinct waves, giving British aircraft time to refuel and rearm. Also, the usual diversionary manoeuvres were not employed so the British were able to deploy as many as 17 squadrons - in good positions - to meet the threat. German bomber formations were smashed, making accurate bombing impossible. Although bombs were dropped on London, Portland and Southampton, little damage was done. Some of the fighting in the skies was visible from the ground and this photograph shows how closely the dogfights between the RAF and the Luftwaffe were followed during the battle.

    It was a day of heavy and sustained fighting and the Germans suffered their highest losses since 18 August. It was obvious to both sides that German tactics had failed and the Luftwaffe had not gained the air supremacy they needed for an invasion. Fighting continued for another few weeks, but the action on 15 September was seen as an overwhelming and decisive defeat for the Luftwaffe. For this reason, this date is celebrated in the United Kingdom as Battle of Britain Day.




    9 Important Dates In The Battle Of Britain
     
  5. ozzy16

    ozzy16 Patron Patron

    15th September 1940.
    Hans Zonderlind, a front gunner in a Dornier Do 17, was astonished at the numbers of aircraft ranged against him.

    We saw the Hurricanes coming towards us and it seemed that the whole of the RAF was there, we had never seen so many British fighters coming at us at once.I saw a couple of our comrades go down, and we got hit once but it did no great damage. All around us were dogfights as the fighters went after each other,then as we were getting ready for our approach to target, we saw what must have been a hundred RAF fighters coming towards us.....where were they coming from? - we had been told that the RAF fighters were very close to extinction, we could not keep our present course, we turned to starboard doing all that we could to avoid the fighters and after a while I am sure we had lost our bearings, so we just dropped our bombs and made our retreat.

    From Patrick Bishop's very good book, ' Battle Of Britian '

    Graham.
     
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