Battle of Britain Day 15th September

Discussion in 'The War In The Air' started by Gage, Sep 15, 2012.

  1. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron



    • 15 September 1940

      [​IMG]


      A newspaper seller in the street watching a "dog-fight" during the Battle of Britain.
      HU 810


      A week after their change of tactics, the Germans launched another massive assault on 15 September, which they believed would finally shatter Fighter Command’s resistance and open the way for a successful invasion. However, since 7 September Britain's defences had recovered, fighter production continued and operational pilot strength was the highest it had been since the start of the Battle of Britain.
      The German offensive came in two distinct waves, giving British aircraft time to refuel and rearm. Also, the usual diversionary manoeuvres were not employed so the British were able to deploy as many as 17 squadrons - in good positions - to meet the threat. German bomber formations were smashed, making accurate bombing impossible. Although bombs were dropped on London, Portland and Southampton, little damage was done. Some of the fighting in the skies was visible from the ground and this photograph shows how closely the dogfights between the RAF and the Luftwaffe were followed during the battle.
      It was a day of heavy and sustained fighting and the Germans suffered their highest losses since 18 August. It was obvious to both sides that German tactics had failed and the Luftwaffe had not gained the air supremacy they needed for an invasion. Fighting continued for another few weeks, but the action on 15 September was seen as an overwhelming and decisive defeat for the Luftwaffe. For this reason, this date is celebrated in the United Kingdom as Battle of Britain Day.

      http://www.iwm.org.uk/history/9-important-dates-in-the-battle-of-britain



     
  2. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Approximately at noon today the BBC have promised to show the flypast of a large number of ww2 surviving planes.

    Miss it at your peril !

    Ron
     
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  3. Drusus Nero

    Drusus Nero Banned

    This anniversary, of all, should be celebrated right around the free world.

    And the unique thing about it, was that our leader of the time, Mr. Churchill, made everyone feel as if they had played a part in it.And they had.

    Truly, Winston was at the most eloquent he would ever be.
    I always liked the speech he made to Congress on his trip to the U.S.....in which he said in part...

    "What kind of a people do they think we are?"

    I also liked to think that Goebbels and Hitler were listening to that speech. It was braodcast I believe, and if not, should have been.

    Yes....this day belonged to "The Few", but Churchill skillfully used it to make everyone feel a sense of togetherness, standing tall, rock solid, uncompromising,
    Finest hour al'right! Liddel Hart rated it as the "Second most decisive battle in world history"

    What was the number one? DUNKIRK.....it set up the circumstances....so we should also spare a thought for Dunkirk as well, and the rearguards who gave their lives or went into captivity. (French and Brits) so that The Few could "Finish the job"

    So, in light of that, I give you .....(just as a treat for those who haven't read it.....all the newbs)


    DUNKIRK.....(From Terence Allen "Spike" Milligan's "Adolf Hitler: My Part In His Downfall."..Page 30)

    The first eventful date in my army career was the eve of the final evacuation from Dunkirk, when I was at the O.P. (observation post). at Galley Hill to help the cook. I had only been in the army 24 hours when it happened. Each news bulletin from the BBC told us an increasingly depressing story. Things were indeed very grave.
    For days previously we could hear the distant sound of explosions and heavy gunfire from across the Channel. Sitting in a crude wood O.P. heaped with earth at two in the morning with a Ross rifle and only five rounds made you feel so bloody useless in relation to what was going on the other side. Five rounds of ammo, and that was between the whole O.P. The day of the actual Dunkirk evacuation the Channel was like a piece of polished steel. I'd never seen a sea so calm. One would say it was miraculous. I presume that something like that had happened to create the "Angel of Mon's" legend.

    That afternoon, Bombardier Andrews and I went down for a swim. It would appear we were the only two people on the South Coast having one. With the distant booms, the still sea, and just two figures on the landscape, it all seemed very very strange. We swam in silence. Occasionally, a squadron of Spitfires or Hurricanes headed out towards France. I remember so clearly, Bombardier Andrews standing up in the water, putting his hands on his hips, and gazing towards where the B.E.F. was fighting for it's life. It was the first time I'd seen genuine concern on a British soldier's face.

    "I can't see how they're going to get them out," he said.

    We sat in the warm water for a while. We felt helpless. Next day the news of the "small armada" came through on the afternoon news. As the immensity of the defeat became apparent, somehow the evacuation turned it into a strange victory. I don't think the nation ever reached such a feeling of solidarity as in that week at any other time during the war.

    Three weeks afterwards, a Bombardier Kean, who had survived the evacuation was posted to us..

    "What was it like?", I asked him.

    "Like son? It was a fuck up, a highly successful fuck up."




    (Drusus takes over)....The "polished steel" effect of the English Channel that day must have also been a reminder of earlier deeds to at least one Captain of one of the yachts to make the perilous trip across the Channel to grab a load of British and French soldiers, "The Sundowner". Her Skipper?

    Commander Charles Lightoller, senior surviving officer from R.M.S. 'Titanic'. The night she sank, the mid Atlantic Ocean was also described as "polished steel", and it also had a 'surreal' quality.

    It must have taken Lightoller back.....

    BTW...did anyone ever record the names of the private craft that participated in the Dunkirk evac? It would certainly make an Honour Roll, and in the best traditions of British seamanship too! Drake's ships were a hotch-potch, and they sailed these same waters to face The Spanish Armada.

    Rule Britannia!
     
  4. 4jonboy

    4jonboy Daughter of a 56 Recce

    Battle of Britain: Historic flypast for 75th anniversary

    A flypast involving about 40 Spitfires and Hurricanes is taking place to commemorate the 75th anniversary of World War Two's Battle of Britain.
    The grouping, the biggest in one place since the war, took off from Goodwood Aerodrome in West Sussex, then flew to airfields linked to the battle.
    Prince Harry was due to take part, but gave up his seat for a veteran when one of the Spitfires was grounded.
    short video:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-34250794
     
  5. Lotus7

    Lotus7 Well-Known Member

    Thanks Ron and Lesley, sadly a I missed it I will catch up later


    David
     
  6. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Took these just after 15.00 in Swindon.
    Then saw them again at about 17.30 in Wokingham a lot lower.
    Super sound.
    [sharedmedia=gallery:albums:909]
     
  7. mandy hall

    mandy hall Junior Member

    Return of the Spitfires starts on Channel 4 any moment now.

    I spent the day at Goodwood and it was a pretty amazing day.

    Mandy
     
  8. ritsonvaljos

    ritsonvaljos Senior Member

    "Battle of Britain Day" was a key date in WW2.

    The BBC "People's War" site has a short but interesting article (contributed by Nick Hudson). It is a testimony of Squadron Leader (later Group Captain) Herbert Moreton Pinfold, who was in command of 56 Squadron at North Weald.

    This is the link to the article:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/93/a3026693.shtml
     
  9. ritsonvaljos

    ritsonvaljos Senior Member

  10. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Battle of Britain Day

    New Luftwaffe tactics

    On 15 September - now known as "Battle of Britain Day" - the Luftwaffe launched two huge bombing raids on London. Believing that the RAF was close to breaking point, the attacks were a repeat of their monumental and devastating attack eight days before. Smaller formations of German planes were also planned to attack Portland and Southampton.

    The Luftwaffe had introduced a significant change of tactics on 7 September. They had switched away from attacking RAF bases and radar stations to focus on bombing London.

    This inadvertently gave Fighter Command much-needed breathing space. As a result, by 15 September, the British were in much better shape than they had been a week before. Their pilots had been rested, squadrons replenished and infrastructure repaired.

    Air-Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding, head of Fighter Command, had brought planes to the South East from all over the country.

    The battle begins

    On the 15th, Prime Minister Winston Churchill visited RAF Uxbridge, the headquarters of No. 11 Group, Fighter Command. This group was led by Air Vice-Marshal Keith Park and was responsible for the defence of London and the south-east of England. On this day, it was the beating heart of the battle.

    The first wave of about 250 bombers came over the Channel at 11am and whilst many Luftwaffe planes were intercepted by the RAF, around half managed to make it to London and drop their loads. A second wave of about the same number returned at 2pm believed to be aiming for South London and the railways out to Kent. The raids continued into the night.

    Churchill later described what he saw at 11 Group: "Presently the red bulbs showed that the majority of our squadrons were engaged. In a little while, all our squadrons were fighting and some had already begun to return for fuel. All were in the air. The lower line of bulbs was out. There was not one squadron left in reserve".

    The Luftwaffe are defeated

    During both of the raids that day, the RAF managed to scatter many of the German bomber formations. This meant that when the surviving bombers did drop their loads, they fell over a wide area and were less harmful. Thousands of Londoners stood in the streets below watching the battle rage over their heads.

    The RAF claimed to have shot down 185 German planes; in fact, it was 61, but these were the highest losses the Luftwaffe had suffered for over a month. The RAF lost 31 planes.

    Although fighting continued in the air for several more weeks, and British cities were bombed sporadically for the rest of the war, German tactics to achieve air superiority ahead of an invasion failed.

    Sunday 15 September marked a clear and decisive defeat for the Luftwaffe. They abandoned the daylight bombing of London on 30 September, although night-time bombing continued into May 1941.
    BBC - History - Battle of Britain Day (pictures, video, facts & news)



    Battle of Britain Day - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
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  11. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    This still does it for me.
    Squadron Leader Brian 'Sandy' Lane, post-sortie, aged 23.

    KIA Two years later: Casualty Details

    Squadron-Leader-Sandy-Lane.jpg
     
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  12. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Memorial Pinner Middlesex
     

    Attached Files:

  13. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    The thousand yard stare.
     
  14. Harry Ree

    Harry Ree Very Senior Member

    The air Battle of Britain achieved by the valour of aircrew and groundcrew not forgetting the constant drip of Ultra intelligence from intercepted Goring's communications to his air fleets on the Channel and Norway from mid July which revealed Goring's strategy of attack to WSC and Fighter Command.

    During this period airfields were under continual attack.I am aware of a older colleague of mine who it transpired, gained some distinction during a raid..He was groundcrew on No 18 Squadron based at Horsham St Faith.another late friend said that he was on the same squadron as W and knew him well.W never divulged much about his service. However a couple of years ago it was revealed that he had carried out an act of bravery when the station was under attack from the Luftwaffe.Apparently during the raid,bowsers were set on fire and W took it on himself to pull other undamaged bowsers to safety.Later, it was said, that W was told to report to an office on the airfield.....it turned out that BoomTrenchard was in the office to greet him and congratulate him on his initiative.I am not aware if W received an award or not.
     
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  15. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    Nothing but respect for all the Pilots.
    Regards
    Tom
     
  16. Gage

    Gage The Battle of Barking Creek MOD

    A haunting photo of Lane. You can almost see what he has been through.
     
  17. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

  18. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    The "hour of destiny" was September 15th, a date thereafter commemorated as "Battle of Britain Day". The title has been disputed; Alfred Price, for one, says that September 15th "has singularly little to commend it.....the day when the British victory claim was furthest from the truth....." Yet, forgetting the "numbers game", it is hard to dispute Churchill's verdict that it was, in fact, "the crux of the Battle of Britain". He made that judgment in the light of his knowledge of what happened to Operation SEALION - which was, of course, from beginning to end, what the Battle of Britain was really about. The Official History sums up with clarity:

    "If 15th August showed the German High Command that air supremacy was not to be won within a brief space, 15th September went far to convince them that it would not be won at all."
    September 15th 1940 (morning)




    BBC ON THIS DAY | 15 | 1940: Victory for RAF in Battle of Britain
     
  19. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Casualties
    CASUALTIES:
    For this day only, to indicate the severity of the days combat actions the full casualty list is displayed.
    Aircraft shown in red are those that were lost or destroyed

    1140hrs: Croydon. Hurricane L2122. 605 Squadron Croydon
    P/O R.E. Jones unhurt. (Shot down in combat with Do17s and Bf109s. Pilot baled out of damaged aircraft)
    1150hrs: Sevenoaks Kent. Hurricane N2537. 229 Squadron Northolt
    P/O G.L.D. Doutrepont killed. (Crashed onto Staplehurst Railway Station after being shot down by Bf109s)
    1200hrs: Sevenoaks Kent. Hurricane V6616. 229 Squadron Northolt
    P/O R.R. Smith wounds to leg. (Baled out after combat with Do215 and Bf110s)
    1210hrs: Tunbridge Wells. Hurricane P3080. 1 RCAF Squadron Northolt
    F/O A.D. Nesbitt wounded. (Shot down by Bf109. Baled out)
    1210hrs: Tunbridge Wells. Hurricane P3876. 1 RCAF Squadron Northolt
    F/O R. Smither killed. (Attacked and shot down by Bf109. Pilot failed to bale out)
    1215hrs: London. Hurricane P2725. 504 Squadron Hendon
    Sgt R.T. Holmes unhurt. (Baled out after aircraft damaged by Bf109 crashed in Buckingham Palace Rd)
    1215hrs: Canterbury. Spitfire R6767. 92 Squadron Biggin Hill
    Fl/Sgt C. Sydney unhurt. (Returned to base with damage to wing after combat with Bf109s)
    1220hrs: Maidstone. Hurricane P3865. 73 Squadron Debden
    P/O R.A. Marchand killed. (Crashed into farm at Teynham after being shot down by Bf109s)
    1225hrs: London. Hurricane L1913. 504 Squadron Hendon
    F/O M.E.A. Royce unhurt. (Returned to base with oil cooler problem after combat action)
    1230hrs: Thames Estuary. Hurricane P3642. 257 Squadron Debden
    P/O C.F.A. Capon unhurt. (Made forced landing at Croydon after combat action)
    1230hrs: London. Spitfire R6690. 609 Squadron Warmwell
    P/O G.N. Gaunt killed. (Crashed in flames near Kenley after being hit by gunfire from Bf110)
    1230hrs: London. Hurricane N2599. 46 Squadron North Weald
    Sgt C.A.L. Hurry unhurt. (Returned to base with damage to mainplane)
    1230hrs: Thurrock Essex. Spitfire P9324. 41 Squadron Hornchurch
    P/O G.A. Langley killed. (Crashed into building after being shot down by Bf109s)
    1230hrs: Middle Wallop. Spitfire K9997. 609 Squadron Warmwell
    P/O E.Q. Tobin unhurt. (Crashed into airfield truck on landing approach)
    1235hrs: Thames Estuary. Hurricane P3620. 257 Squadron Debden
    Fl/Lt P.M. Brothers unhurt. (Landed at Biggin Hill for safety check with damage sustained in combat)
    1235hrs: Ashford. Hurricane V7433. 501 Squadron Kenley
    S/L H.A.V. Hogan unhurt. (Damaged in cooling system after combat with Bf109s. Made forced landing)
    1245hrs: London. Hurricane V6576. 242 Squadron Coltishall
    Fl/Lt G.E. Ball unhurt. (Made forced landing with damaged aircraft after combat action)
    1245hrs: Ashford. Hurricane P2760. 501 Squadron Kenley
    P/O A.E.A von den Hove d'Ertsenrijck killed. (Aircraft exploded in mid-air after hit by gunfire from Bf109)
    1245hrs: Kent. Hurricane P2903. 303 Squadron Northolt
    P/O W. Lokuciewski leg wounds. (Returned to base after receiving damage by Bf109)
    1258hrs: South London. Hurricane N2481. 504 Squadron Hendon
    P/O J.T. Gurteen killed. (Shot down by enemy aircraft and crashed at full throttle into residential house)
    1430hrs: Marden. Hurricane L2012. 605 Squadron Croydon
    P/O T.P.M. Cooper-Slipper injured. (Hit by gunfire from Do17. Collided with E/A losing wing. Pilot baled out)
    1430hrs: Thames Estuary. Hurricane R4087. 310 Squadron Duxford
    Sgt J. Hubacek slight injuries. (Baled out after aircraft was hit by Bf109 gunfire)
    1435hrs: S.E. London. Hurricane V6566. 249 Squadron North Weald
    P/O K.T. Lofts unhurt. (Crash landed at West Malling after attacked by Bf109 while attacking He111)
    1440hrs: Rye Kent. Hurricane P2884. 242 Squadron Coltishall
    Fl/L G. ff Powell-Sheddon slight injuries. (Shot down by Bf109 while attacking Do17 and baled out)
    1445hrs: North Weald. Hurricane P2954. 302 Squadron Duxford
    Fl/Lt T.P. Chlopik killed. (Shot down by enemy aircraft. Baled out but died on landing)
    1445hrs: Thames Estuary. Hurricane R4085. 310 Squadron Duxford
    P/O A. Hess unhurt. (Shot down in flames by enemy aircraft and pilot baled out safely)
    1445hrs: S.E. London. Hurricane N2705. 504 Squadron Hendon
    F/O M. Jebb died of injuries 19.9.40. (Crashed at Dartford after combat with enemy aircraft)
    1445hrs: South of London. Hurricane L1973. 1 RCAF Squadron Northolt
    F/O A. Yuile wounded. (Returned to base with severe damage after combat with He111 and poss Bf109s)
    1450hrs: Ashford. Spitfire R6606. 92 Squadron Biggin Hill
    P/O R.H. Holland slight injuries. (Injuries sustained on landing after baling out of damaged aircraft)
    1450hrs: S of London. Spitfire II P7303. 611 Squadron Digby
    F/O T.D. Williams unhurt. (Returned to base with severe damage after combat with He111)
    1500hrs: Dartford. Hurricane P3939. 303 Squadron Northolt
    Sgt T. Andruszkow unhurt. (Baled out after being hit by gunfire from Bf109)
    1500hrs: Ashford. Spitfire P9513. 92 Squadron Biggin Hill
    P/O A.C. Bartley unhurt. (Returned to base with damage after combat with Do17)
    1500hrs: Over Channel. Spitfire R6991. 19 Squadron Duxford
    Sub/Lt A.G. Blake unhurt. (Made forced landing in Kent after combat action)
    1500hrs: Maidstone. Hurricane P3515. 242 Squadron Coltishall
    Sub/Lt R.J. Cork unhurt. (Made landing at Rochford. Damage to cockpit and wings in combat with Bf109)
    1500hrs: North Kent. Hurricane R2685. 303 Squadron Northolt
    P/O M. Feric unhurt. (Returned to base after aircraft damaged by gunfire from Bf109s)
    1500hrs: North Kent. Hurricane V7465. 303 Squadron Northolt
    S/L R.G. Kellett unhurt. (Returned to base with damaged aircraft after action with Bf109s)
    1500hrs: Hawkhurst. Hurricane P3113. 213 Squadron Tangmere
    Sgt R.T. Llewellyn badly wounded. (Shot down in combat with Bf110s and baled out)
    1500hrs: Kenley. Hurricane P2836. 238 Squadron Middle Wallop
    Sgt L. Pidd killed. (Baled out after being shot down by enemy aircraft but was dead on landing)
    1500hrs: Kenley. Hurricane L2089. 238 Squadron Middle Wallop
    P/O V.C. Simmonds unhurt. (Returned to base with damage to aircraft tailplane after combat)
    1500hrs: Off Gravesend. Hurricane V6673. 303 Squadron Northolt
    Sgt M. Wajciechowski unhurt. (Returned to base after aircraft damaged by gunfire from Bf109s)
    1505hrs: West Malling. Hurricane P3920. 238 Squadron Middle Wallop
    Fl/Lt M.V. Blake unhurt. (Aircraft damaged in combat and had to make a forced landing)
    1505hrs: Gravesend. Hurricane P3577. 303 Squadron Northolt
    Sgt M. Brzezowski Listed as missing. (Believed crashed in Estuary after combat with Bf109s)
    1505hrs: North Weald. Hurricane P3935. 302 Squadron Duxford
    Sgt J. Kowalski unhurt. (Aircraft damaged by enemy aircraft and returned to base)
    1505hrs: Kingswood Kent. Spitfire X4324. 603 Squadron Hornchurch
    F/O A.P. Pease killed. (Shot down by unknown enemy aircraft. Pilot did not bale out)
    1505hrs: Over Channel. Spitfire X4070. 19 Squadron Duxford
    Sgt J.A. Potter taken POW. (Ditched damage aircraft off French coast and captured by German military)
    1505hrs: Gravesend. Hurricane V6684. 303 Squadron Northolt
    F/O W. Urbanowicz unhurt. (Returned to base after aircraft damaged by gunfire from Bf109s)
    1505hrs: Gravesend. Hurricane L2099. 303 Squadron Northolt
    F/O W. Zak unhurt. (Returned to base after aircraft damaged by gunfire from Bf109s)
    1510hrs: Kenley. Hurricane P3462. 238 Squadron Middle Wallop
    F/O C.T. Davis unhurt. (Managed to return to base with damaged aircraft)
    1510hrs: Kent. Spitfire R7019. 603 Squadron Hornchurch
    S/L G.L. Denholm unhurt. (Hit by gunfire from Do17. Baled out of damaged aircraft)
    1510hrs: Rye Sussex. Spitfire R6922. 609 Squadron Warmwell
    F/O J.D. Dundas unhurt. (Returned to base with severe damage after combat with Do17)
    1510hrs: Over Channel. Spitfire P9431. 19 Squadron Duxford
    Sgt H.A.C. Roden slight injuries. (Crash landed after combat with Bf109)
    1515hrs: Appledore. Hurricane V6688. 607 Squadron Tangmere
    P/O P.J.T. Stephenson injured. (Collided with E/A after attack on Do17. Pilot baled out)
    1520hrs: Beachy Head. Spitfire X4412. 602 Squadron Westhampnett
    Sgt C.F. Babbage unhurt. (Made forced landing at Shoreham with damage by gunfire from Do17)
    1530hrs: Over Channel. Hurricane V6698. 253 Squadron Kenley
    P/O A.R.H. Barton unhurt. (Damaged in combat with Do215s. Forced landing at Hawkinge)
    1635hrs: Kenley. Hurricane P3833. 238 Squadron Middle Wallop
    P/O A.R. Covington unhurt. (Exhausted fuel tank and made forced landing near East Grinstead)
    Unknown time: Boscombe Down. Hurricane P3660. 56 Squadron Boscombe Down
    Sgt T.R. Tweed killed. (Failed to come out of spin during dog fight practice over base)

    September 15th 1940 (Afternoon)
     
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  20. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    15 SEPTEMBER 1940
    A week after their change of tactics, the Germans launched another massive assault on 15 September, which they believed would finally shatter Fighter Command’s resistance and open the way for a successful invasion. However, since 7 September Britain's defences had recovered, fighter production continued and operational pilot strength was the highest it had been since the start of the Battle of Britain.

    The German offensive came in two distinct waves, giving British aircraft time to refuel and rearm. Also, the usual diversionary manoeuvres were not employed so the British were able to deploy as many as 17 squadrons - in good positions - to meet the threat. German bomber formations were smashed, making accurate bombing impossible. Although bombs were dropped on London, Portland and Southampton, little damage was done. Some of the fighting in the skies was visible from the ground and this photograph shows how closely the dogfights between the RAF and the Luftwaffe were followed during the battle.

    It was a day of heavy and sustained fighting and the Germans suffered their highest losses since 18 August. It was obvious to both sides that German tactics had failed and the Luftwaffe had not gained the air supremacy they needed for an invasion. Fighting continued for another few weeks, but the action on 15 September was seen as an overwhelming and decisive defeat for the Luftwaffe. For this reason, this date is celebrated in the United Kingdom as Battle of Britain Day.

    9 Important Dates In The Battle Of Britain
     

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