Archer resin bolts/rivet heads

Discussion in 'Modelling' started by Belgian Dave, Mar 4, 2014.

  1. Belgian Dave

    Belgian Dave Well-Known Member

    Has anyone used these resin bolt/rivet heads as manufactured by Archer?
    If yes, what are they like, easy to use?
     
  2. Neilie

    Neilie Member

    Hi Dave,

    It may depend on which scale you are working in. I have used them on 1/76 scale military vehicles and I find them a bit lacking in height. They are probably to scale however and I will likely continue to use them as they are very good for rows where many are needed and the alternative is very painstaking.

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers,

    Neil
     
  3. Belgian Dave

    Belgian Dave Well-Known Member

    Hello Neil

    It will be for 1/72, and possibly 1/76 in the future.

    In 1/72 it's to add missing rivets on a S-Model Vickers light tank
    For 1/76 it's correcting the Airfix WW1 Tanks problems.

    Not quite sure how else to do rivets/bolt heads in such small scales? Have a few ideas, how do you do it?
     
  4. Neilie

    Neilie Member

    Hi Dave,

    I model mostly softskins so rivets and bolt heads are not a big issue. When doing reinforcing straps on wood truck bodies, I tend to use .010 or .015 styrene rod and chop up little piles of rivets from which I pick selectively using the tip of a #11 x-acto (scalpel) blade. This works well for me because I can control the spacing. The only use of the Archer rivets personally so far was on a 3" AA Gun master for Milicast and you can see them although they don't stand out too prominently. They are great to apply if you have experience with waterslide transfers and they can even be bent around objects. There are some good tutorials on Youtube, the best of which is called "Working with Resin Surface Details". It will show you exactly how to apply them.
    Funnily enough, I have a friend in the UK who uses the Airfix WW1 tanks as a supply of rivets and slices them off to re-apply to other models....he now complains of a good size stash of "bald" WW1 Tanks.

    Hope this helps you.

    Cheers,

    Neil
     
  5. Belgian Dave

    Belgian Dave Well-Known Member

    I was thinking that it may be possible to use some Oyumaru moulding material to make a mould of the existing rivets and then produce my own. I'll let you know how it works out.

    Maybe for 1/35, you can begin to see the shape and form of the rivets/bolt heads, but in small scale they are only dots really!

    What a waste of WW1 tanks :) What could he do with his 'bald' ones? A very interesting what-if may be?
     
  6. Belgian Dave

    Belgian Dave Well-Known Member

    The Oyumaru was not such a success. The rivet detail im trying to copy is just so fine. Im thinking..............
     
  7. Neilie

    Neilie Member

    Too bad....you may want to try the Archer ones, They are not that bad but if you want to duplicate those already on say an Airfix WW1 tank, they will not look quite as prominent. In my opinion, the rivets on a lot of models are very oversize anyway and not really to scale. They are more akin to nuts or bolt heads. They just paint up nicer when dry-brushed.

    Cheers,

    Neil
     
  8. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Hot air manufacturer

    I wasn't aware of this Oyumaru thing, I'm sure I'll find a use for it :)

    Sorry, you were asking for help on a subject and it was I who took advantage of it! What a parasite :P
     
  9. Belgian Dave

    Belgian Dave Well-Known Member

    Oyumaru..........easy to use, hard to remember its name!
     
  10. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Hot air manufacturer

    Look, if you want proper rivets you'll have to go this way.
     
  11. Belgian Dave

    Belgian Dave Well-Known Member

    Nice link, but real men heat them up and bang em in with a hammer!
     
  12. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Hot air manufacturer

    Bah, luddite!
     
  13. Belgian Dave

    Belgian Dave Well-Known Member

    I have a feeling Scottish shipbuilders would be laughing at four men putting one rivet in with such a large contraption. Obviously there was a need for more Irn-Bru on the tank production line :D
     
  14. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Hot air manufacturer

    One was working, the others were Union stewards :biggrin:
     

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