All The Victoria Crosses of World War Two

Discussion in 'General' started by Drew5233, Jun 6, 2009.

  1. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Below you will find the name of every Victoria Cross holder and the citation that accompanies it, that was awarded during the Second World War.

    I have as accurately as possible put them all in chronological order using the information provided on the citation. Where no date is given I have used either the award date or the publish date whichever was the earliest of the two. I did think about listing them in alphabetical order or even categorising them by the campaign but thought by placing them in chronological order you would read them as the war progressed to its end in 1945 and maybe see something a bit deeper about this world struggle for freedom. So you can see some small cogs that were all part of the big fighting machine from Norway to Northern France and the Battle of Britain, North Africa and through into Italy, The campaign in Burma, The continuous assault on Germany from the air, The ground fighting from Normandy into Germany, culminating in the final victories in Europe and the Far East.

    Some statistics you may find of interest that I put together whilst gathering all the info:

    23 VC’s were awarded at Sea, 127 to Land actions and 32 to valour in the Air. One person was awarded two VC’s and another from the evidence and recommendation given by the enemy.

    Broken down across the six years of fighting:
    1940=16, 1941=22, 1942=33, 1943=25, 1944=52, 1945=34. It’s interesting to note that in the last two years of fighting, almost the same amount of VC’s were awarded as that of the previous four years.

    Recipient’s nationalities are as follows: British 84, Australian 20, Indian 19, Canadian 17, Nepalese 9, Irish 8, New Zealand 8, South African 3, Danish 1, Fijian 1, Kenyan 1 and Rhodesian 1.

    Finally whilst reading these citations I think it’s worth remembering that for everyone one of the 182 Victoria Cross holders who risked everything for their mates and for freedom during World War Two there was thousands of men and women from Britain and the Commonwealth who did the same all around the world in those six years but received no recognition.

    To help Identify the location of a specific VC Citation I have drafted a list below showing the recipients names in alphabetical order with the corresponding post number:


    Arthur Louis Aaron - 1943; Turin, Italy-air action. Post #89

    Abdul Hafiz - 1944; Imphal, India. Post #105

    Agansing Rai - 1944; Bishenpur, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #122

    Ali Haidar - 1945; Fusignano, Italy. Post #174

    Michael Allmand - 1944; Pin Hmi Road Bridge, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #116

    Charles Groves Wright Anderson - 1942; Muar River, Malaya. Post #41

    Eric Anderson - 1943; Wadi Akarit, Tunisia. Post #79

    John Thompson McKellar Anderson - 1943; Longstop Hill, Tunisia. Post #81

    Richard Wallace Annand - 1940; River Dyle, Belgium. Post #4

    Cyril Joe Barton - 1944; Nuremberg, Germany-air action. Post #104

    John Daniel Baskeyfield - 1944; Arnhem, Holland. Post #141

    Sidney Bates - 1944; Sourdeval, France. Post #127

    Ian Willoughby Bazalgette - 1944; Trossy St. Maximin, France-air action. Post #126

    Stephen Halden Beattie - 1942; St. Nazaire, France. Post #45

    John Beeley - 1941; Sidi Rezegh, Libya. Post #34

    Bhanbhagta Gurung - 1945; Tamandu, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #165

    Bhandari Ram - 1944; Arakan, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #148

    Frank Gerald Blaker - 1944; Taunghi, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #123

    John Henry Cound Brunt - 1944; Faenza, Italy. Post #149

    Richard Henry Burton - 1944; Monte Ceco, Italy. Post #143

    Robert Henry Cain - 1944; Arnhem, Holland. Post #140

    George Albert Cairns - 1944; Henu Block, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #102

    Donald Cameron - 1943; Kaafjord, Norway. Post #91

    John Charles Campbell - 1941; Sidi Rezegh, Libya. Post #35

    Kenneth Campbell - 6 April 1941; Brest, France. Post #20

    Lorne MacLaine Campbell - 6 April 1943; Wadi Akarit, Tunisia. Post #78

    Edward Colquhoun Charlton - 21 April 1945; Wistedt Germany. Post #176

    Edward Thomas Chapman - 1945; Dortmund-Ems canal, Germany. Post # 171

    Leonard Geoffrey Cheshire — 1944; Germany. Post #134

    Chhelu Ram - 1943; Djebel Garci, Tunisia. Post #80

    Albert Chowne - 1945; Dagua, New Guinea. Post #170

    Wilwood Alexander Sandys Clarke - 1943; Guiriat El Atach, Tunisia. Post #82

    Aubrey Cosens - 1945; Mooshof, Germany. Post #159

    John Alexander Cruickshank - 1944; Atlantic-air action. Post #132

    Arthur Edward Cumming - 1942; Kuantan, Malaya. Post #40

    David Vivian Currie - 1944; Battle of Falaise, France. Post #131

    Arthur Roden Cutler - 1941; Merdjayoun-Damour, Lebanon. Post #27

    Thomas Currie Derrick - 1943; Sattelberg, New Guinea. Post #96

    Dennis Donnini - 1945; Roer, Holland. Post #153

    Thomas Frank Durrant - 1942; St. Nazaire, France. Post #48

    George Harold Eardley - 1944; Overloon, Holland. Post #144

    John Hurst Edmondson - 1941; Tobruk, Libya. Post #21

    Hughie Idwal Edwards - 1941; Bremen, Germany-air action. Post #28

    Keith Elliott - 1942; Ruweisat, Egypt. Post #58

    Harold Marcus Ervine-Andrews - 1940; Dunkirk, France. Post #8

    Eugene Esmonde - 1942; Straits of Dover, England-air action. Post #42

    Fazal Din - 1945; Meiktila, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #162

    Edward Stephen Fogarty Fegen - 1940; Atlantic. Post #17

    Henry Robert Bowreman Foote - 1942; Libya. Post #50

    Rev. John Weir Foote - 1942; Dieppe Raid, France. Post #62

    Ian Edward Fraser - 1945; Johore Straits, Singapore. Post #183

    John Alexander French - 1942; Milne Bay, New Guinea. Post #64

    The Hon. Christopher Furness - 1940; Arras, France. Post #7

    Gaje Ghale - 1943; Chin Hills, Burma (now Myanmar). Post 94

    Ganju Lama - 1944; Ningthoukhong, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #117

    Philip John Gardner - 1941; Tobruk, Libya. Post #36

    Donald Edward Garland - 1940; Albert Canal, Belgium-air combat. Post #9

    Gian Singh - 1945; Kamye, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #163

    Guy Penrose Gibson - 1943; Mohne Dam, Germany-air combat. Post #87

    James Heather Gordon - 1941; Djezzine, Syria. Post #30

    Thomas William Gould - 1942; Crete, Mediterranean. Post #53

    Percival Eric Gratwick - 1942; Miteiriya Ridge, Egypt. Post #66

    Robert Hampton Gray - 1945; Honshū, Japan-air combat. Post #185

    Thomas Gray - 1940; Albert Canal, Belgium-air combat. Post #10

    John Hollington Grayburn - 1944; Arnhem, Holland. Post #135

    George Gristock - 1940; River Escaut, Belgium. Post #5

    George Ward Gunn - 1941; Sidi Rezegh, Libya. Post #33

    Arthur Stanley Gurney - 1942; Tel-el-Eisa, Egypt. Post #59

    John Hannah - 1940; Antwerp, Belgium-air combat. Post #16

    Henry Eric Harden - 1945; Brachterbeek, Holland. Post #155

    John Pennington Harman - 1944; Kohima, India. Post #106

    John William Harper - 1944; Antwerp, Belgium. Post #142

    John Daniel Hinton - 1941; Kalamai, Greece. Post #22

    Charles Ferguson Hoey - 1944; Ngakyedauk Pass, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #101

    Stanley Elton Hollis - 1944; Normandy, France. Post #114

    David Ernest Hornell - 1944; Faroes, Atlantic-air combat. Post #125

    Alec George Horwood - 1944; Kyauchaw, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #98

    Alfred Clive Hulme - 1941; Crete, Greece. Post #24

    Thomas Peck Hunter - 1945; Lake Comacchio, Italy. Post #180

    James Joseph Bernard Jackman - 1941; Tobruk, Libya. Post #37

    Norman Cyril Jackson - 1944; Schweinfurt, Germany-air combat. Post #107

    David Auldjo Jamieson - 1944; Grimbosq, France. Post #128

    Francis Arthur Jefferson - 1944; Monte Casino, Italy. Post #112

    Kamal Ram - 1944; River Gari, Italy. Post #109

    Karamjeet Singh Judge - 1945; Meiktila, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #166

    Richard Kelliher - 1943; New Guinea. Post #90

    Edward Kenna - 1945; Wewak, New Guinea. Post #179

    John Patrick Kenneally - 1943; Dj. Arada, Tunisia. Post #84

    Geoffrey Charles Tasker Keyes - 1941; Beda Littoria, Libya. Post #32

    William Henry Kibby - 1942; Miteiriya Ridge, Egypt. Post #65

    Bruce Steel Kingsbury - 1942; Isurava, New Guinea. Post #63

    George Arthur Knowland - 1945; Kangaw, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #156

    Lachhiman Gurung - 1945; Taungdaw, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #178

    Lalbahadur Thapa - 1943; Rass-es-Zouai, Tunisia. Post #77

    Anders Frederik Emil Victor Schau Lassen - 1945; Lake Comacchio, Italy. Post #173

    Herbert Wallace Le Patourel - 1942; Tebourba, Tunisia. Post 71

    Nigel Gray Leakey - 1941; Colito, Abyssinia (now Ethiopia). Post #23

    Roderick Alastair Brook Learoyd - 1940; Dortmund-Ems Canal, Germany-air combat. Post #13

    Ian Oswald Liddell - 1945; Lingen, Germany. Post #172

    John Wallace Linton - 1943; Mediterranean. Post #86

    David Samuel Anthony Lord - 1944; Arnhem, Holland-air action. Post #139

    Charles Antony, The Lord, Lyell - 1943; Dj Bou Arada, Tunisia. Post #83

    John Bernard Mackey - 1945; Tarakan Island, Borneo. Post #176

    James Joseph Magennis - 1945; Johore Straits, Singapore. Post #184

    John Keefer Mahony - 1944; River Melfa, Italy. Post #113

    Hugh Gordon Malcolm - 1942; Chougui, Tunisia-air combat. Post #70

    Leslie Thomas Manser - 1942; Cologne, Germany-air combat. Post #51

    Jack Foreman Mantle - 1940; Portland, England. Post #11

    Charles Cecil Ingersoll Merritt - 1942; Dieppe, France. Post #61

    Rawdon Hume Middleton - 1942; Turin, Italy-air combat. Post #69

    Anthony Cecil Capel Miers - 1942; Corfu Harbour, Greece. Post #56

    George Allan Mitchell - 1944; Damiano Ridge, Italy. Post #99

    Andrew Charles Mynarski - 1944; Cambrai, France-air combat. Post #118

    Namdeo Jadhao - 1945; Senio River, Italy. Post #175

    Nand Singh - 1944; Maungdaw-Buthidaung Road, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #103

    Netrabahadur Thapa - 1944; Bishenpur, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #121

    John Dering Nettleton - 1942; Augsberg, Germany-air combat. Post #49

    Augustus Charles Newman - 1942; St. Nazaire, France. Post #47

    William Ellis Newton - 1943; New Guinea-air combat. Post #74

    Moana-Nui-a-Kiwa Ngarimu - 1943; Tebaga Gap, Tunisia. Post #76

    Harry Nicholls - 1940; River Escaut, Belgium. Post #6

    Eric James Brindley Nicolson - 1940; Southampton, England-air combat. Post #15

    Gerard Ross Norton - 1944; Montegridolfo, Italy. Post #133

    John Robert Osborn - 1941; Mount Butler, Hong Kong. Post #39

    Robert Anthony Maurice Palmer - 1944; Cologne, Germany-air combat. Post #151

    Parkash Singh - 1943; Donbaik, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #73

    Frank John Partridge - 1945; Bougainville, New Guinea. Post #182

    Frederick Thornton Peters - 1942; Oran, Algeria. Post #68

    Basil Charles Godfrey Place - 1943; Kaafjord, Norway. Post #92

    Patrick Anthony Porteous - 1942; Dieppe, France. Post #60

    Prakash Singh - 1945; Kanlan Ywathit, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #157

    Premindra Singh Bhagat - 1941; Gallabat, Abyssinia (now Ethiopia). Post #18

    Lionel Ernest Queripel - 1944; Arnhem, Holland. Post #137

    Ram Sarup Singh - 1944; Kennedy Peak, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #146

    John Neil Randle - 1944; Kohima, India. Post #108

    Reginald Roy Rattey - 1945; Bougainville, Solomon Islands. Post #168

    Claude Raymond - 1945; Talaku, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #167

    William Reid - 1943; Dusseldorf, Germany-air combat. Post #95

    Richhpal Ram - 1941; Keren, Eritrea. Post #19

    Peter Scawen Watkinson Roberts - 1942; Crete, Mediterranean. Post #52

    Maurice Albert Windham Rogers - 1944; Anzio, Italy. Post #129

    Gerard Broadmead Roope - 1940; West Ford, Norway. Post #2

    Robert Edward Dudley Ryder - 1942; St. Nazaire, France. Post #44

    William Alfred Savage - 1942; St. Nazaire, France. Post #46

    Arthur Stewart King Scarf - 1941; Singora, Malaya-air combat. Post #38

    Derek Anthony Seagrim - 1943; Mareth Line, Tunisia. Post #75

    Alfred Edward Sephton - 1941; Crete, Mediterranean. Post #31

    Sher Bahadur Thapa - 1944; San Marino, Italy. Post #136

    Sher Shah - 1945; Kyeyebyin, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #154

    Robert St. Vincent Sherbrooke - 1942; North Cape, Norway. Post #72

    William Philip Sidney - 1944; Anzio, Italy. Post #100

    Ernest Alvia ("Smokey") Smith - 1944; River Savio, Italy. Post #145

    Quentin George Murray Smythe - 1942; Alem Hamza, Egypt. Post #54

    Richard Been Stannard - 1940; Namsos, Norway. Post #14

    Leslie Thomas Starcevich - 1945; Beaufort, Borneo. Post #181

    James Stokes - 1945; Kervenheim, Germany. Post #161

    Sefanaia Sukanaivalu - 1944; Bougainville, Solomon Islands. Post #120

    Edwin Swales - 1945; Pforzheim, Germany-air combat. Post #158

    Thaman Gurung - 1944; Monte San Bartolo, Italy. Post #147

    George Thompson - 1945; Dortmund-Ems Canal, Germany-air combat. Post #152

    Frederick Albert Tilston - 1945; Hochwald Forest, Germany. Post #160

    Frederick George Topham - 1945; Rhine, Germany. Post #169

    Leonard Henry Trent - 1943; Amsterdam, Holland-air combat. Post #85

    Lloyd Allan Trigg - 1943; Atlantic-air combat. Post #88

    Paul Triquet - 1943; Casa Berardi, Italy. Post #97

    Tulbahadur Pun - 1944; Mogaung, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #119

    Hanson Victor Turner - 1944; Ningthoukhong, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #115

    Victor Buller Turner - 1942; El Aqqaqir, Egypt. Post #67

    Umrao Singh - 1944; Kaladan Valley, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #150

    Charles Hazlitt Upham - 1941; Crete, Greece and 1942; Ruweisat Ridge, Egypt. Posts #25 and #57

    Richard Wakeford - 1944; Cassino, Italy. Post #110

    Adam Herbert Wakenshaw - 1942; Mersa Matruh, Egypt. Post #55

    Malcolm David Wanklyn - 1941; Sicily, Mediterranean. Post #26

    Bernard Armitage Warburton Warburton-Lee - 1940; Narvik, Norway. Post #3

    James Allen Ward - 1941; Munster, Germany-air combat. Post #29

    Tasker Watkins - 1944; Barfour, France. Post #130

    William Basil Weston - 1945; Meiktila, Burma (now Myanmar). Post #164

    Thomas Wilkinson - 1942; Java Sea, Malaya. Post #43

    Eric Charles Twelves Wilson - 1940; Observation Hill, Somaliland (now Somalia). Post #12

    Peter Harold Wright - 1943; Salerno, Italy. Post #93

    Yeshwant Ghadge - 1944; Upper Tiber Valley, Italy. Post #124
     
  2. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]


    Gerard Broadmead Roope

    Rank: Lieutenant-Commander

    Unit: HMS Glowworm, Royal Navy

    Awarded: 12th February 1946

    Nationality: British

    The citation in the London Gazette of 6th July 1945, gives the following details:

    On the 8th April, 1940, H.M.S. Glowworm was proceeding alone in heavy weather towards a rendezvous in West Fjord, when she met and engaged two enemy destroyers, scoring at least one hit on them. The enemy broke off the action and headed North, to lead the Glowworm on to his supporting forces. The Commanding Officer, whilst correctly appreciating the intentions of the enemy, at once gave chase. The German heavy cruiser, Admiral Hipper, was sighted closing the Glowworm at high speed and an enemy report was sent which was received by H.M.S. Renown. Because of the heavy sea, the Glowworm could not shadow the enemy and the Commanding Officer therefore decided to attack with torpedoes and then to close in order to inflict as much damage as possible. Five torpedoes were fired and later the remaining five, but without success. The Glowworm was badly hit; one gun was out of action and her speed was much reduced, but with the other three guns still firing she closed and rammed the Admiral Hipper. As the Glowworm drew away, she opened fire again and scored one hit at a range of 400 yards. The Glowworm, badly stove in forward and riddled with enemy fire, heeled over to starboard, and the Commanding Officer gave the order to abandon her. Shortly afterwards she capsized and sank. The Admiral Hipper hove to for at least an hour picking up survivors but the loss of life was heavy, only 31 out of the Glowworm's complement of 149 being saved.


    Full information concerning this action has only recently been received and the VICTORIA CROSS is bestowed in recognition of the great valour of the Commanding Officer who, after fighting off a superior force of destroyers, sought out and reported a powerful enemy unit, and then fought his ship to the end against overwhelming odds, finally ramming the enemy with supreme coolness and skill.


    Additional information:

    Not only was this the first VC of the war but it was the only one awarded through a recommendation from the enemy. Kaptain zur See Heye wrote to the Admiralty via the Red Cross praising the captain and crews gallantry.

    Lt-Cdr. Roope went down with his ship and has no known grave.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:



    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Portsmouth Naval Memorial
     
  3. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Bernard Armitage Warburton-Lee

    Rank: Captain

    Unit: HMS Hardy, Royal Navy

    Awarded: 2nd July 1940

    Nationality: British

    The citation in the London Gazette for 7th June, 1940, gives the following information:

    For gallantry, enterprise and daring in command of the Force engaged in the first Battle of Narvik, on the 10th of April, 1940. On being ordered to carry out an attack on Narvik, he learned from Tranoy that the enemy held the place in much greater force than had been thought. He signalled to the Admiralty that the enemy were reported to be holding Narvik in force, that six Destroyers and one Submarine were there, that the channel might be mined, and that he intended to attack at dawn, high water. The Admiralty replied that two Norwegian Coast Defence Ships might be in German hands that he alone could judge whether to attack and that whatever decision he made would have full support. Captain Warburton-Lee gave out the plan for his attack and led his Flotilla of five Destroyers up the Fjord in heavy snowstorms, arriving off Narvik just after daybreak. He took the enemy completely by surprise and made three successful attacks on warships and merchantmen in the harbour. The last attack was made only after anxious debate. On the Flotilla withdrawing, five enemy Destroyers of superior gun-power were encountered and engaged. The Captain was mortally wounded by a shell which hit "Hardy's" bridge. His last signal was "Continue to engage the enemy".



    Additional Infomation:

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Ballangen New Cemetery, Norway
     
  4. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]


    Richard Wallace Annand

    Rank: 2nd Lieutenant

    Unit: 2nd Battalion, The Durham Light Infantry, British Army

    Awarded: 3rd September 1940

    Nationality: British


    The citation in "The London Gazette," for 23rd August 1940, gives the following details:

    For most conspicuous gallantry on the 15th-16th May 1940 when the platoon under his command was on the south side of the River Dyle, astride a blown bridge. During the night a strong attack was beaten off, but about 11 a.m. the enemy again launched a violent attack and pushed forward a bridging party into the sunken bottom of the river. Second Lieutenant Annand attacked this party, but when ammunition ran out he went forward himself over open ground, with total disregard for enemy mortar and machine-gun fire. Reaching the top of the bridge, he drove out the party below, inflicting over twenty casualties with hand grenades. Having been wounded he rejoined his platoon, had his wound dressed, and then carried on in command.


    During the evening another attack was launched and again Second Lieutenant Annand went forward with hand grenades and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy.


    When the order to withdraw was received, he withdrew his platoon, but learning on the way back that his batman was wounded and had been left behind, he returned at once to the former position and brought him back in a wheelbarrow, before losing consciousness as the result of wounds.


    Additional Information:

    Richard Annand finshed the war a Captain

    He later lost his hearing and was discharged from the battalion.

    After serving in a variety of posts he was offered a commission in the Pay Corps which he declined.

    In 1948 he was invalided out of the Army.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Durham Crematorium
     
  5. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    George Gristock

    Rank: Warrant Officer II (CSM)

    Unit: 2nd Battalion, The Royal Norfolk Regiment, British Army

    Awarded: 24th June 1940

    Nationality: British

    The following details are given in the London Gazette of 23rd August, 1940:

    For most conspicuous gallantry on the 21st May 1940 when his company was holding a position on the line of the River Escaut, south of Tournai. After a prolonged attack, the enemy succeeded in breaking through beyond the company's right flank which was consequently threatened. Company Sergeant-Major Gristock having organised a party of eight riflemen from company headquarters, went forward to cover the right flank.

    Realising that an enemy machine-gun had moved forward to a position from which it was inflicting heavy casualties on his company, Company Sergeant-Major Gristock went on, with one man as connecting file, to try to put it out of action. Whilst advancing, he came under heavy machine-gun fire from the opposite bank and was severely wounded in both legs, his right knee being badly smashed. He nevertheless gained his fire position, some twenty yards from the enemy machine-gun post, undetected, and by well aimed rapid fire killed the machine-gun crew of four and put their gun out of action. He then dragged himself back to the right flank position from which he refused to be evacuated until contact with the battalion on the right had been established and the line once more made good.

    By his gallant action, the position of the company was secured, and many casualties prevented. Company Sergeant-Major Gristock has since died of his wounds.


    Additional Infomation:

    CSM Gristock made it back to his unit and was evacuated to Brighton Hospital where he died several days later from his wounds.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Bear Road Cemetery, Brighton
     
  6. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Harry Nicholls

    Rank: Lance Corporal

    Unit: 3rd Battalion, Grenadier Guards, British Army

    Awarded: 22nd June 1945

    Nationality: British

    The following details are given in the London Gazette of 26th July, 1940:

    On the 21st May, 1940, Lance-corporal Nicholls was commanding a section in the right-forward platoon of his company when the company was ordered to counter-attack. At the very start of the advance he was wounded in the arm by shrapnel, but continued to lead his section forward; as the company came over a small ridge, the enemy opened heavy machine-gun fire at close range.

    Lance-corporal Nicholls, realising the danger to the company, immediately seized a Bren gun and dashed forward towards the machine guns, firing from the hip. He succeeded in silencing first one machine-gun
    and then two other machine guns, in spite of being again severely wounded.

    Lance-corporal Nicholls then went on up to a higher piece of ground and engaged the German infantry massed behind, causing many casualties, and continuing to fire until he had no more ammunition left.
    He was wounded at least four times in all, but absolutely refused to give in. There is no doubt that his gallant action was instrumental in enabling his company to reach its objective, and in causing the enemy to fall back across the River Scheldt.

    Lance-Corporal Nicholls has since been reported to have been killed in action.*


    Additional Infomation:

    *Harry Nicholls was captured when he ran out of ammunition and survived the war.

    [​IMG]
    Southern Cemetery, West Bridgford,
    Nottinghamshire
     
  7. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    The Hon. Christopher Furness

    Rank: Lieutenant

    Unit: 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards, British Army

    Awarded: 30th July 1946

    Nationality: British

    The citation in the London Gazette of 5th February, 1946, gives the following details:

    Lieutenant the Honourable C Furness was in command of the Carrier Platoon, Welsh Guards, during the period 17th-24th May, 1940, when his Battalion formed part of the garrison of Arras. During this time his Platoon was constantly patrolling in advance of or between the widely dispersed parts of the perimeter, and fought many local actions with the enemy Lieutenant Fumess displayed the highest qualities of leadership and dash on all these occasions and imbued his command with a magnificent offensive spirit.

    During the evening of 23rd May, Lieutenant Furness was wounded when on patrol but he refused to be evacuated By this time the enemy, considerably reinforced, had encircled the town on three sides and withdrawal to Douai was ordered during the night of 23rd-24th May. Lieutenant Furness's Platoon, together with a small force of light tanks, were ordered to cover the withdrawal of the transport consisting of over 40 vehicles.

    About 0230 hours, 24th May, the enemy attacked on both sides of the town. At one point the enemy advanced to the road along which the transport columns were withdrawing, bringing them under very heavy small arms and anti-tank gun fire. Thus the whole column was blocked and placed in serious jeopardy Immediately Lieutenant Furness, appreciating the seriousness of the situation, and in spite of his wounds, decided to attack the enemy, who were located in a strongly entrenched position behind wire.

    Lieutenant Furness advanced with three carriers, supported by the light tanks At once the enemy opened up with very heavy fire from small arms and anti-tank guns. The light tanks were put out of action, but Lieutenant Furness continued to advance. He reached the enemy position and circled it several times at close range, inflicting heavy losses. All three Carriers were hit and most of their crews killed or wounded. His own Carrier was disabled and the driver and Bren gunner killed. He then engaged the enemy in personal hand-to-hand combat until he was killed. His magnificent act of self sacrifice against hopeless odds, and when already wounded, made the enemy withdraw for the time being and enabled the large column of vehicles to get clear unmolested and covered the evacuation of some of the wounded of his own Carrier Platoon and the light tanks.


    Additional Infomation:
    Lt. Furness has no known grave.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Dunkirk Town CWGC Cemetery
     
  8. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Harold Marcus Ervine-Andrews


    Rank: Lieutenant Acting Captain

    Unit: The East Lancashire Regiment, British Army

    Awarded: 6th August 1940

    Nationality: Irish

    The citation in the London Gazette of 30th July, 1940, gives the following details:

    For most conspicuous gallantry on active service on the night of the 31st May/1st June 1940. Captain Ervine-Andrews took over about a thousand yards of the defences in front of Dunkirk, his line extending along the Canal de Bergues, and the enemy attacked at dawn. For over ten hours, notwithstanding intense artillery, mortar, and machine-gun fire, and in the face of vastly superior enemy forces, Captain Ervine-Andrews and his company held their position.

    The enemy, however, succeeded in crossing the canal on both flanks; and, owing to superior enemy forces, a company of Captain Ervine-Andrews' own battalion, which was despatched to protect his flanks; was, unable to gain contact with him. There being danger of one of his platoons being driven in, he called for volunteers to fill the gap, and then, going forward, climbed on to the top of a straw-roofed barn, from which he engaged the enemy with rifle and light automatic fire, though, at the time, the enemy were sending mortar-bombs and armour-piercing bullets through the roof.

    Captain Ervine-Andrews personally accounted for seventeen of the enemy with his rifle, and for many more with a Bren gun. Later, when the house which he held had been shattered by enemy fire and set alight, and all his ammunition had been expended, he sent back his wounded in the remaining carrier. Captain Ervine-Andrews then collected the remaining eight men of his company from this forward position, and when almost completely surrounded, led them back to the cover afforded by the company in the rear, swimming or wading up to the chin in water for over a mile; having brought all that remained of 'his company safely back, he once again took up position.

    Throughout this action, Captain Ervine-Andrews displayed courage, tenacity, and devotion to duty, worthy of the highest traditions of the British Army, and his magnificent example imbued his own troops with the dauntless fighting spirit which he himself displayed.


    Additional Infomation:

    Harold Marcus Ervine-Andrews was later promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

    [​IMG]
    Glynn Valley Crematorium, Cornwall.
    Ashes were scattered in his garden at Gorran.
     
  9. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Donald Garland

    Rank: Flying Officer

    Unit: No.12 Squadron, Royal Air Force

    Awarded: 11th June 1940

    Nationality: Irish

    The citation in "The London Gazette”, for 11th June, 1940, gives the following details:
    Flying Officer Garland was the pilot and Sergeant Gray the observer of the leading aircraft of a formation of five aircraft that attacked a bridge over the Albert Canal which had not been destroyed and was allowing the enemy to advance into Belgium. All the air crews of the squadron concerned volunteered for the operation and, after five crews had been selected by drawing lots, the attack was delivered at low altitude against this vital target. Orders were issued that this bridge was to be destroyed at all costs. As had been anticipated, exceptionally intense machine gun and anti-aircraft fire was encountered, and the bridge area was heavily protected by enemy fighters. In spite of this the formation successfully delivered a dive bombing attack from the lowest practicable altitude and British fighters in the vicinity reported that the target was obscured by the bombs bursting on it and in its vicinity.

    Only one aircraft returned from this mission out of the five concerned. The pilot of this aircraft reports that in addition to the extremely heavy antiaircraft fire, through which our aircraft dived to attack the objective, they were also attacked by a large number of enemy fighters after they had released their bombs on the target. Much of the success of this vital operation must be attributed to the formation leader; Flying Officer Garland, and to the coolness and resource of Sergeant Gray, who navigated Flying Officer Garland's aircraft under most difficult conditions in such a manner that the whole formation was able successfully to attack the target in spite of subsequent heavy losses.

    Flying Officer Garland and Sergeant Gray unfortunately failed to return from the mission.


    Additional Infomation:

    There are several version's that account for the death of Garland. Some sources suggest that he crashed down in the place of Lanaken, Belgium. Another account suggests he died after his action in a hospital in Maastricht. The 3rd crew member did not get a mention as he had no decisive role during this action.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium
     
  10. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Thomas Gray

    Rank: Sergeant (Observer)

    Unit: No.12 Squadron, Royal Air Force

    Awarded: 11th June 1940

    Nationality: British


    The citation in "The London Gazette”, for 11th June, 1940, gives the following details:
    Flying Officer Garland was the pilot and Sergeant Gray the observer of the leading aircraft of a formation of five aircraft that attacked a bridge over the Albert Canal which had not been destroyed and was allowing the enemy to advance into Belgium. All the air crews of the squadron concerned volunteered for the operation and, after five crews had been selected by drawing lots, the attack was delivered at low altitude against this vital target. Orders were issued that this bridge was to be destroyed at all costs. As had been anticipated, exceptionally intense machine gun and anti-aircraft fire was encountered, and the bridge area was heavily protected by enemy fighters. In spite of this the formation successfully delivered a dive bombing attack from the lowest practicable altitude and British fighters in the vicinity reported that the target was obscured by the bombs bursting on it and in its vicinity.

    Only one aircraft returned from this mission out of the five concerned. The pilot of this aircraft reports that in addition to the extremely heavy antiaircraft fire, through which our aircraft dived to attack the objective, they were also attacked by a large number of enemy fighters after they had released their bombs on the target. Much of the success of this vital operation must be attributed to the formation leader; Flying Officer Garland, and to the coolness and resource of Sergeant Gray, who navigated Flying Officer Garland's aircraft under most difficult conditions in such a manner that the whole formation was able successfully to attack the target in spite of subsequent heavy losses.

    Flying Officer Garland and Sergeant Gray unfortunately failed to return from the mission.


    Additional Infomation:

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium
     
  11. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Jack Foreman Mantle


    Rank: Acting Leading Seaman

    Unit: HMS Foylebank, Royal Navy

    Awarded: 21st June 1941

    Nationality: British


    The following details are given in the London Gazette of 4th September, 1940:

    Leading Seaman Jack Mantle was in charge of the Starboard pom-pom when FOYLEBANK was attacked by enemy aircraft on the 4th of July, 1940. Early in the action his left leg was shattered by a bomb, but he stood fast at his gun and went on firing with hand-gear only; for the ship's electric power had failed. Almost at once he was wounded again in many places. Between his bursts of fire he had time to reflect on the grievous injuries of which he was soon to die; but his great courage bore him up till the end of the fight, when he fell by the gun he had so valiantly served.


    Additional Infomation:

    Mantle died later that day as a result of his wounds

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Portland Naval Cemetery, Dorset
     
  12. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]


    Eric Charles Twelves Wilson


    Rank: Lieutenant Acting Captain

    Unit: The East Surrey Regiment (Attached Somaliland Camel Corps) , British Army

    Awarded: 28th July 1942

    Nationality: British


    The following details are given in "The London Gazette," of 11th October 1940:
    For most conspicuous gallantry on active service in Somaliland. Captain Wilson was in command of machine-gun posts manned by Somali soldiers in the key position of Observation Hill, a defended post in the defensive organisation of the Tug Argan Gap in British Somaliland.

    The enemy attacked Observation Hill on August 11th, 1940. Captain Wilson and Somali gunners under his command beat off the attack and opened fire on the enemy troops attacking Mill Hill, another post within his range. He inflicted such heavy casualties that the enemy, determined to put his guns out of action, brought up a pack battery to within seven hundred yards, and scored two direct hits through the loopholes of his defences, which, bursting within the post, wounded Captain Wilson severely in the right shoulder and in the left eye, several of his team being also wounded. His guns were blown off their stands but he repaired and replaced them and, regardless of his wounds, carried on, whilst his Somali sergeant was killed beside him.

    On August 12th and 14th the enemy again concentrated field artillery fire on Captain Wilson's guns, but he continued, with his wounds untended, to man them.

    On August 15th two of his machine-gun posts were blown to pieces, yet Captain Wilson, now suffering from malaria in addition to wounds, still kept his own post in action.

    The enemy finally over-ran the post at 5 p.m. on the 15th August when Captain Wilson, fighting to the last, was killed.*


    Additional Infomation:

    Captain Wilson was promoted to Lt. Colonel.

    *Captain Wilson was finally captured after a heavy enemy bombardment. He was freed when Eritrea was conquered and survived the war.



    [​IMG]
    Buried on the 29th December 2008 at St Peter & St Paul Churchyard, Stowell, Near Sherbourne, Somerset.
     
  13. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Roderick Alistair Brook Learoyd

    Rank: Acting Flight Lieutenant

    Unit: No.49 Squadron, Royal Air Force

    Awarded: 9th September 1940

    Nationality: British

    The following details are given in the London Gazette of 20th August, 1940:

    This officer, as first pilot of a Hampden aircraft, has repeatedly shown the highest conception of his duty and complete indifference to personal danger in making attacks at the lowest altitudes regardless of opposition.

    On the night of I2th August, 1940, he was detailed to attack a special objective on the Dortmund-Ems Canal. He had attacked this objective on a previous occasion and was well aware of the risks entailed. To achieve success it was necessary to approach from a direction well known to the enemy, through a lane of especially disposed anti-aircraft defences, and in the face of the most intense point blank fire from guns of all calibres. The reception of the preceding aircraft might well have deterred the stoutest heart, all being hit and two lost. Flight Lieutenant Learoyd nevertheless made his attack at 150 feet, his aircraft being repeatedly hit and large pieces of the main planes torn away. He was almost blinded by the glare of many searchlights at close range but pressed home this attack with the greatest resolution and skill.

    He subsequently brought his wrecked aircraft home and, as the landing flaps were inoperative and the undercarriage indicators out of action, waited for dawn in the vicinity of his aerodrome before landing, which he accomplished without causing injury to his crew or further damage to the aircraft. The high courage, skill and determination, which this officer has invariably displayed on many occasions in the face of the enemy, sets an example which is unsurpassed.


    Additional Infomation:

    Later Promoted to the rank of Wing Commander


    [​IMG]
    Worthing Crematorium
     
  14. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Richard Been Stannard


    Rank: Lieutenant


    Unit: HM Trawler Arab, Royal Navy Reserve


    Awarded: 3rd September 1940

    Nationality: British


    The citation in the London Gazette for 16th August, 1940, gives the following information:
    For outstanding valour and single devotion to duty at Namsos.

    When enemy bombing attacks had set on fire many tons of hand grenades on Namsos wharf, with no shore water supply available, Lieutenant Stannard ran Arab's bows against the wharf and held her there. Sending all but two of his crew aft, he then endeavoured for two hours to extinguish the fire with hoses from the forecastle. He persisted in this work till the attempt had to be given up as hopeless.

    After helping other ships against air attacks, he placed his own damaged vessel under shelter of a cliff, landed his crew and those of two other trawlers, and established an armed camp. Here those off duty could rest while he attacked enemy aircraft which approached by day, and kept anti-submarine watch during the night. When another trawler near-by was hit and set on fire by a bomb, he, with two others, boarded Arab and moved her 100 yards before the other vessel blew up.

    Finally, when leaving the fjord, he was attacked by a German bomber which ordered him to steer East or be sunk. He held on his course, reserved his fire till the enemy was within 800 yards, and then brought the aircraft down.

    Throughout a period of five days Arab was subjected to 31 bombing attacks and the camp and Lewis gun positions ashore were repeatedly machine-gunned and bombed; yet the defensive position was so well planned that only one man was wounded.

    Lieutenant Stannard ultimately brought his damaged ship back to an English port. His continuous gallantry in the presence of the enemy was magnificent, and his enterprise and resource not only caused losses to the Germans but saved his ship and many lives.


    Additional Infomation:

    Later promoted to Captain

    [​IMG]
    Rockwood Crematorium, Rockwood, Sydney.
    Ashes scattered in garden of remembrance.
     
  15. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    James Brindley Nicolson

    Rank: Flight Lieutenant

    Unit: No.249 Squadron, RAF

    Awarded: 25th November 1940

    Nationality: British

    The citation in the London Gazette of 15th November, 1940, gives the following details:

    During an engagement with the enemy near Southampton on 16th August, 1940, Flight Lieutenant Nicolson's aircraft was hit by four cannon shells, two of which wounded him whilst another set fire to the gravity tank.

    When about to abandon his aircraft owing to flames in the cockpit, he sighted an enemy fighter. This he attacked and shot down; although as a result of staying in his burning aircraft he sustained serious burns to his hands, face, neck and legs. Flight Lieutenant Nicolson has always displayed great enthusiasm for air fighting and this incident shows that he possesses courage and determination of a high order. By continuing to engage the enemy after he had been wounded and his aircraft set on fire, he displayed exceptional gallantry and disregard for the safety of his own life.


    Additional Infomation:
    Nicolson was the The Battle of Britain's only VC.

    Also awarded a DFC.

    Later promoted to the rank of Wing-Commander.

    Nicolson was killed in action near the Bay of Bengal on 2 May 1945.


    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Singapore Memorial
     
  16. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    John Hannah

    Rank: Sergeant

    Unit: No.83 Squadron, RAF

    Awarded: 1st October 1940

    Nationality: British

    The following details are given in the London Gazette of October 1st, 1940:

    On the night of 15th September, 1940, Sergeant Hannah was the wireless operator/air gunner in an aircraft engaged in a successful attack on enemy barge concentrations at Antwerp. It was then subjected to intense anti-aircraft fire and received a direct hit from a projectile of an explosive and incendiary nature, which apparently burst inside the bomb compartment. A fire started which quickly enveloped the wireless operator's and rear gunner's cockpits, and as both the port and starboard petrol tanks had been pierced, there was grave risk of the fire spreading. Sergeant Hannah forced his way through the fire to obtain two extinguishers and discovered that the rear gunner had had to leave the aircraft. He could have acted likewise, through the bottom escape hatch or forward through the navigator's hatch, but remained and fought the fire for ten minutes with the extinguishers, beating the flames with his log book when these were empty.

    During this time thousands of rounds of ammunition exploded in all directions and he was almost blinded by the intense heat and fumes, but had the presence of mind to obtain relief by turning on his oxygen supply. Air admitted through the large holes caused by the projectile made the bomb compartment an inferno and all the aluminium sheet metal on the floor of this airman's cockpit was melted away, leaving only the cross bearers. Working under these conditions which caused burns to his face and eyes, Sergeant Hannah succeeded in extinguishing the fire. He then crawled forward, ascertained that the navigator had left the aircraft, and passed the latter's log and. maps to the pilot.

    This airman displayed courage, coolness and devotion to duty of the highest order and, by his action in remaining and successfully extinguishing the fire under conditions of the greatest danger and difficulty, enabled the pilot to bring the aircraft safely to its base.


    Additional Infomation:
    Hannah was the youngest RAF VC of the war.

    Around a year after the action that earned him a VC he contracted TB and was pensioned out of the RAF in 1942. He died in 1947 no doubt as a result of the wounds and health problems that plagued him since 1941.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Birstall (St. James) Churchyard, Leicestershire
     
  17. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Edward Stephen Fogarty Fegen

    Rank: Commander Acting Captain

    Unit: HMS Jarvis Bay, Royal Navy

    Awarded: 12th June 1941

    Nationality: Irish

    The citation in the London Gazette for 26th November, 1940, reads:
    For valour in challenging hopeless odds and giving his life to save the many ships it was his duty to protect.

    On the 5th of November, 1940, in heavy seas, Captain Fegen, in His Majesty's Armed Merchant Cruiser Jervis Bay, was escorting thirty-eight Merchantmen. Sighting a powerful German warship he at once drew clear of the Convoy, made straight for the Enemyand brought his ship between the Raider and her prey, so that they might scatter and escape. Crippled, in flames, unable to reply, for nearly an hour the Jervis Bay held the German's fire. So she went down but of the Merchantmen all but four or five were saved.


    Additional Infomation:

    Fegen was remembered in Winston Churchills famous broadcast speech on 13 May 1945 "Five years of War", as having defended Ireland's honour.
    "...Captain Fegen, V.C., and other Irish heroes that I could easily recite, and all bitterness by Britain for the Irish race dies in my heart. I can only pray that in years which I shall not see, the shame will be forgotten and the glories will endure, and that the peoples of the British Isles and of the British Commonwealth of Nations will walk together in mutual comprehension and forgiveness....."

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Portsmouth Naval Memorial
     
  18. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Premindra Singh Bhagat


    Rank: 2nd Lieutenant


    Unit: Royal Bombay Sappers and Miners, Corps of Indian Engineers, Indian Army


    Awarded: 10th November 1941

    Nationality: Indian


    The citation in the London Gazette of 6th June 1941, gives the following details:

    For most conspicuous gallantry on active service in the Middle East. During the pursuit of the enemy following the capture of Metemma on the night 31st January-1st February, 1941, Second-Lieutenant Bhagat was in command of a section of a Field Company, Sappers and Miners, detailed to accompany the leading mobile troops (Bren Carriers) to clear the road and adjacent areas of mines. For a period of four days and over a distance of 55 miles this officer in the leading carrier led the Column. He detected and supervised the clearing of fifteen minefields. Speed being essential he worked at high pressure from dawn to dusk each day. On two occasions when his carrier was blown up with casualties to others and on a third occasion when ambushed and under close enemy fire, he himself carried straight on with his task. He refused relief when worn out with strain and fatigue and with one ear-drum punctured by an explosion, on the grounds that he was now better qualified to continue his task to the end.

    His coolness, persistence over a period of 96 hours and gallantry, not only in battle, but throughout the long period when the safety of the Column and the speed at which it could advance were dependent on his personal efforts, were of the highest order.


    Additional Infomation:

    Later promoted to Lieutenant General in the Indian Army.


    [​IMG]
    Cremated at Keoratola, India
    Ashes were scattered in various Indian rivers
     
  19. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Richhpal Ram

    Rank: Subadar

    Unit: 4th Battalion, 6th Rajputana Rifles, Indian Army

    Awarded: 10th November 1941

    Nationality: Indian


    The citation in the London Gazette of 6th June 1941, gives the following details:

    During the assault on enemy positions in front of Keren, Eritrea, on the night of 7-8th February, 1941, Subadar Richpal Ram, who was second-in-command of a leading .company, insisted on accompanying the forward platoon and led its attack on the first objective with great dash and gallantry. His company commander being then wounded, he assumed command of the company, and led the attack of the remaining two platoons to the final objective. In face of heavy fire, some thirty men with this officer at their head rushed the objective with the bayonet and captured it. The party was completely isolated, but under the inspiring leadership of Subadar Richpal Ram, it .beat back six enemy counter-attacks between midnight and 0430 hours. By now, ammunition had run out, and this officer extricated his command and fought his way back to his battalion with a handful of survivors through the surrounding enemy.

    Again, in the attack on the same position on 12th February, this officer led the attack of his company. He pressed on fearlessly and determinedly in the face of heavy and accurate fire, and by his personal example inspired his company with his resolute spirit until his right foot was blown off. He then suffered further wounds from which he died. While lying wounded he continued to wave his men on, and his final words were "We'll capture the objective ".

    The heroism, determination and devotion to duty shown by this officer were beyond praise, and provided an inspiration to all who saw him.


    Additional Infomation:

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]
    Keren Cremation Memorial, Eritrea
     
  20. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]

    Kenneth Campbell

    Rank: Flying Officer

    Unit: No.22 Squadron, RAFVR

    Awarded: 23rd June 1943

    Nationality: British


    The following details are given in The London Gazette of 13th March, 1942:
    This officer was the pilot of a Beaufort aircraft or Coastal Command which was detailed to attack an enemy battle cruiser in Brest Harbour at first night on the morning of 6th April, 1941. The aircraft did not return but it is now known that a torpedo attack was carried out with the utmost daring.

    The battle cruiser was secured alongside the wall on the north shore of the harbour, protected by a stone mole bending round it from the west. On rising ground behind the ship stood protective batteries of guns. Other batteries were clustered thickly round the two arms of land which encircle the outer harbour. In this outer harbour near the mole were moored three heavily-armed antiaircraft ships, guarding the battle cruiser.

    Even if an aircraft succeeded in penetrating these formidable defences, it would be almost impossible, after delivering a low level attack, to avoid crashing into the rising ground beyond.

    This was well known to Flying Officer Campbell who, despising the heavy odds went cheerfully and resolutely to the task. He ran the gauntlet of the defences. Coming in almost at sea level, he passed the anti aircraft ships at less than mast-height in the very mouths of their guns, and skimming over the mole launched a torpedo at point blank range. The battle cruiser was severely damaged below the water-line, and was obliged to return to the dock whence she had come only the day before.

    By pressing home his attack at close quarters in the face of a withering fire on a course fraught with extreme peril, Flying Officer Campbell displayed valour of the highest order.


    Additional Infomation:

    During a memorial service on 6 April 2002 Flying Officer Campbell's brother handed the Victoria Cross over to the Commander of No. 22 Squadron, RAF. The service took place exactly 59 years after the death of Flying Officer Campbell.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Kerfautras Cemetery, Brest, France
     

Share This Page