All The George Crosses of World War Two

Discussion in 'General' started by Drew5233, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Leonard John Miles

    Title/Rank: ARP Warden

    Unit/Occupation: Air Raid Precautions

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 21st - 22nd September 1940, Ilford, Essex

    The citation in the London Gazette of 17th January 1941, gives the following particulars:

    No citation listed or found.

    Circumstances of Miles’s George Cross:

    He left the safety of his shelter to warn others that there was an unexploded bomb in the area which was believed to have a delayed fuse. The Bomb exploded seriously injuring Miles. Whilst he lay dying a colleague attempted to rescue him but Miles told him to go and see if anyone needed help nearby a fire caused by a fractured gas main. Miles dies later that night of his injuries.


    Additional Information:

    Received George Cross posthumously.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Norman Tunna

    Title/Rank: Shunter

    Unit/Occupation: Great Western Railway (GWR)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 26th September 1940, Morpeth Dock, Birkenhead, Cheshire

    The citation in the London Gazette of 24th January 1941, gives the following particulars:

    Enemy action over the Liverpool Port Area resulted in a number of serious fires involving railway and dock warehouse properties.

    A large number of the incendiary bombs fell on and about the goods station and sidings. Amongst the wagons in the Yard were a trainload of ammunition, various trucks of petrol in tins, bombs and ammunition fuses. Most of the enemy incendiary bombs were extinguished by the prompt action of the staff on duty before damage could be done, but a serious fire developed from incendiaries falling in one section of the section of the station premises.

    In the course of these events, Shunter Tunna discovered two incendiary bombs burning in a sheeted open wagon, containing 250lb bombs. With complete disregard for person risk, Tunna extinguished the incendiary bombs and removed them from the truck. The top layer of these heavy bombs was hot.

    Tunna’s action displayed courage and very high degree and eliminated the risk of serious explosions, the result of which it would be difficult to measure.


    Additional Information:

    Tunna’s GC was the only one awarded on Wirral soil.

    In 1982 at Liverpool Lime Street Station a diesel locomotive was named "Norman Tunna, GC".
     
  3. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Laurence Frank Sinclair

    Title/Rank: Wing Commander

    Unit/Occupation: 110 Squadron, RAF

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 30th September. 1940, Wattisham, Suffolk

    The citation in the London Gazette of 17th January 1941, gives the following particulars:

    During a night in September, 1940, an aircraft burst into flames while taking off. Wing Commander Sinclair immediately went to the scene to render assistance, but two 250 Ib. bombs exploded before he reached it. Undeterred, and knowing that two more bombs were in the aircraft, he pressed on and dashing into the fire he succeeded in dragging the air gunner to a safe distance. In this act this officer displayed the most complete disregard for his own safety. Unfortunately the rescued air gunner has since died of his injuries.


    Additional Information:

    Later promoted to the rank of Air Vice Marshal.

    Also awarded KCB, CBE, DSO and Bar.

    Also awarded medals from America, France and Yugoslavia

    Later Sir Lawrence
     
  4. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    William Horace Taylor

    Title/Rank: Probationary Temporary Sub-Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: late September/early October 1940, RAF Depot, Uxbridge

    The citation in the London Gazette of 14th January 1941, gives the following particulars:

    For great gallantry and undaunted devotion to duty in connection with mine disposal in late September/early October 1940, and in particular with an extremely dangerous operation at the Royal Air Force Depot, Uxbridge.


    Additional Information:

    Later promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Commander.

    Also awarded a MBE.

    Taylor held positions within the Scout Association for twenty eight years after the war.
     
  5. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Robert Selby Armitage

    Title/Rank: Probationary Temporary Sub-Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve

    Awarded: 24th May 1941

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: September and October 1940

    The citation in the London Gazette of 27th December 1940, gives the following particulars:

    No citation listed in the Gazette.

    Circumstances of Armitage’s George Cross:

    Armitage defused numerous unexploded bombs and mines during the blitz in 1940, one of many that collectively earned him his George Cross was a mine that fell on Orpington in Kent. The mine had come to rest in a large tree and Armitage climbed a ladder to defuse it, offering no chance of escape if the fuse was triggered.


    Additional Information:

    Later promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Commander.

    Also awarded the George Medal one of only eight people.

    Armitage commanded a coaster at the evacuation at Dunkirk.

    Armitage shot his wife in 1982 wounding her and then turned the gun on himself taking his own life.
     
  6. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Wilson Hodgson Charlton

    Title/Rank: Acting Flight Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Air Force (Bomb Disposal)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: September and October 1940

    The citation in the London Gazette of 21st January 1941, gives the following particulars:

    No citation listed in the Gazette.

    Circumstances of Charlton’s George Cross:

    During the months of September and October 1940, during the height of the Blitz, Charlton was employed on special bomb disposal duty and dealt with over 200 unexploded devices spread over two counties. During this time not one device exploded.


    Additional Information:

    Finally promoted to the rank of Squadron Leader.

    From 1942-1945 Charlton was in a Japanese Prisoner of War Camp.

    Charlton commanded Bomb Disposal 5134 Squadron from 1946 to1948.

    From 1948 to1950 Charlton was Group Armament Officer.
     
  7. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Herbert John Leslie Barefoot

    Title/Rank: Lieutenant (Acting Major)

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Engineers

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: September/October 1940

    The citation in the London Gazette of 22nd January 1941, gives the following particulars:

    This officer dealt with and defused some of the first unexploded bombs in this country. In these early pioneer stages new types of bombs were constantly being found. Captain Barefoot was, therefore, responsible for the discovery of much new and valuable information. On July 28 he assisted Dr Merriman of London in experimenting on and afterwards defusing three unexploded bombs of a new shape at Great Yarmouth. By then Captain Barefoot had defused thirty or more such bombs of varying types and shapes. On the night of September 1 Captain Barefoot received information about unexploded bombs blocking the LNER main line. There were six live bombs in one place. This was a time when delayed-action time fuse bombs were much in use. In view of the importance of clearing the line at all costs, Captain Barefoot and his men deliberately ignored the safety period of four days then laid down. By 7am work was begun and continued without cessation in relays throughout the day. Captain Barefoot assisted personally in this remarkably expeditious operation, and by the evening the line had been cleared and at 6.40pm the first train was running. Normally this work would have taken a week to perform. Captain Barefoot worked on one of the first parachute magnetic mines dropped in this country. At the time we had very little knowledge of the mechanism of these mines, and much was learnt in these initial stages.


    Additional Information:


    Educated at Dulwich College in South London.

    Barefoot joined the Inns of Court OTC in 1915

    Barefoot served with the RNVR during WW1 and then the RAMC in the Egyptian Expeditionary Force from 1916 to1919.

    Promoted to Major in 1941.

    After the war Barefoot returned to his career as an Architect.

    [​IMG]
    New Ipswich Cemetery, UK
     
  8. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    George Walter Inwood

    Title/Rank: Section Commander, 10th Birmingham (Public Utilities) Battalion

    Unit/Occupation: later 30th Warwickshire (Birmingham) Battalion, Home Guard

    Awarded: 10th October 1941

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 15th/16th October 1940, Birmingham

    The citation in the London Gazette of 27th May 1941, gives the following particulars:

    No citation listed in the Gazette.

    Circumstances of Inwood’s George Cross:

    After a heavy German air raid on the night of 15/16th October on Birmingham, Inwood was asked by the police to aid in recovery work in Bishop Street. Leading six volunteers he discovered that half a dozen people were trapped in a gas filled cellar. A hole was dug and Inwood lowered on a rope. He managed to pull two men clear but was overcome by fumes on his third foray down. A doctor on the scene was unable to revive him.


    Additional Information:

    Inwood’s widow received her husband’s GC.

    Inwood is buried Yardley Cemetery, Birmingham.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Alexander Fraser Campbell

    Title/Rank: 2nd Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: 9 Bomb Disposal Company, Corps of Royal Engineers

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 17th October 1940, Triumph Engineering Co, Coventry

    The citation in the London Gazette of 22nd January 1941, gives the following particulars:

    No citation listed in the Gazette.

    Circumstances of Campbell’s George Cross:

    2nd Lieutenant Campbell discovered that a unexploded bomb he was attempting to defuse had a delayed-action fuse. Unable to extract this fuse without risk to other people and property he decided to move the bomb by lorry to a more remote location. The bomb was carefully loaded onto the lorry and Campbell lay beside the bomb during transit so as to alert the driver if he heard the clock start giving them time to take cover. The bomb was successfully disposed of Sergeant Gibson was working with Campbell at this incident.


    Additional Information:

    Campbell was killed the following day with seven of his colleagues including Sergeant Gibson attempting to defuse another bomb in Coventry.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    London Road Cemetery, Coventry
     
  10. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Jack Maynard Cholmondeley Easton

    Title/Rank: Probationary Temporary Sub-Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (Bomb Disposal)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 17th October 1940, Hoxton, London

    The citation in the London Gazette of 23rd January 1941, gives the following particulars:

    No citation listed in the Gazette.

    Circumstances of Easton’s George Cross:

    Responding to reports of a large unexploded mine in the Hoxton area of London. Along with Able Seaman Southwell (See Below) Easton found the 1,500kg mine had crashed through the roof of a house and was hanging by its parachute inches above the flooring.

    Easton decided to defuse the mine there rather than attempt to move it to a safer area. He started to defuse the mine with Southwell’s assistance and no sooner had they started the mine slipped closer to the floor causing some masonry to fall into the room and the chimney pot collapsed. As the dust settled and the men held their breath Easton heard the clockwork mechanism start whirring. Easton shouted to Southwell, ‘Run for it!’ They had ten to twenty seconds.

    Southwell ran out into the road closely followed by Easton. Easton managed to dive into a surface air raid shelter just as the mine exploded. Easton was knocked unconscious and buried under rubble from the explosion. Rescuers rushed from the safe area and dug Easton out.

    Southwell had escaped the building but the explosion caught up with him as he fled the scene and killed him. The blast was so large it wiped out six of Hoxton’s streets and the devastation so bad it was a further six weeks before Southwell’s body was recovered from the debris.

    Easton did survive but suffered a broken back. He spent the next twelve months in plaster and then returned to Naval Service.



    Additional Information:

    Later promoted to Lieutenant.

    Eastonwas educated at Pangbourne College.

    Easton was solicitor by profession before the war.

    Easton went on to skipper armed trawlers and minesweepers during WW2.
     
  11. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    [​IMG]


    Bennett Southwell

    Title/Rank: Able Seaman

    Unit/Occupation: H.M.S. Vernon, Royal Navy (Bomb Disposal)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 17th October 1940, Hoxton, London

    The citation in the London Gazette of 23rd January 1941, gives the following particulars:

    No citation listed in the Gazette.

    Circumstances of Southwell’s George Cross:

    Responding to reports of a large unexploded mine in the Hoxton area of London. Along with Sub Lieutenant Easton, Able Seaman Southwell found the 1,500kg mine had crashed through the roof of a house on Clifton Street and was hanging by its parachute inches above the flooring.

    Easton decided to defuse the mine there rather than attempt to move it to a safer area. He started to defuse the mine with Southwell’s assistance and no sooner had they started the mine slipped closer to the floor causing some masonry to fall into the room and the chimney pot collapsed. As the dust settled and the men held their breath Easton heard the clockwork mechanism start whirring. Easton shouted to Southwell, ‘Run for it!’ They had ten to twenty seconds.

    Southwell ran out into the road closely followed by Easton. Easton managed to dive into a surface air raid shelter just as the mine exploded. Easton was knocked unconscious and buried under rubble from the explosion. Rescuers rushed from the safe area and dug Easton out.

    Southwell had escaped the building but the explosion caught up with him as he fled the scene and killed him. The blast was so large it wiped out six of Hoxton’s streets and the devastation so bad it was a further six weeks before Southwell’s body was recovered from the debris.

    Easton did survive but suffered a broken back. He spent the next twelve months in plaster and then returned to Naval Service.


    Additional Information:

    Southwell joined the Royal Navy in 1939.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Michael Gibson

    Title/Rank: Sergeant

    Unit/Occupation: 9 Bomb Disposal Company, Corps of Royal Engineers

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 18th October 1940, Coventry, Warwickshire

    The citation in the London Gazette of 22nd January 1941, gives the following particulars:

    No citation listed in the Gazette.

    Circumstances of Gibson’s George Cross:

    Sergeant Gibson was in charge of an operation to dig out and defuse a bomb when another bomb exploded nearby. The bomb he was working on then began 'hissing' and seemed likely to explode. Gibson continued to work on the 250 kg bomb. Sadly the bomb exploded after it had been removed by truck from the housing estate in which it had fallen. Six other men were killed in the blast, Second Lieutenant Alexander Fraser Campbell and Sappers William Gibson, Richard Gilchrest, Jack Plumb, Ronald William Skelton and Ernest Arthur Stote.


    Additional Information:

    Gibson enlisted into and formerly served with the Durham Light Infantry.

    Gibson was killed by the same bomb as 2nd Lieutenant Campbell who earned a George Cross the day before.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    London Road Cemetery, Coventry
     
  13. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Brandon Moss

    Title/Rank: Special Constable

    Unit/Occupation: Coventry Special Constabulary

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 20th October 1940.

    The citation in the London Gazette of 13th December 1941, gives the following particulars:

    No citation found.

    Circumstances of Moss’s George Cross:

    Moss led two rescue attempts on houses which had been destroyed by a high explosive bomb during heavy German air raids on the 14th of November 1940, managing to free three people trapped in the rubble in the first house after tunnelling to them on his own. After saving these people it was discovered there were some more trapped under the debris next door. Again he tunnelled into what used to be a house and another person was saved and he recovered four bodies. A fractured gas main and a delayed action bomb no more than twenty yards from the scene added to the danger of falling masonry and structural collapse as the raid continued. Moss had worked for over 7 hours from 11pm to 630am and only when the sun was rising did he agree to stop working.


    Additional Information:

    Moss worked in the building trade before the war.
     
  14. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    John Herbert Babington

    Title/Rank: Probationary Temporary Sub-Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve; Bomb Disposal

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: Autumn, Chatham Naval Dockyard

    The citation in the London Gazette of 27th December 1940, gives the following particulars:

    No citation listed in the Gazette.

    Circumstances of Babington’s George Cross:

    Babington offered to deal with a bomb that had failed to explode after falling on the Naval Dockyard, Chatham. The bomb was lodged in a hole some 16 feet deep. Babington was lowered into the hole so he could attach a line to the fuse. Unfortunately the line broke and he had to repeat the procedure of being lowered down to the bomb another two more times and the third attempt proved successful and the fuse was withdrawn without further incident. It is worth pointing out that bombs were normally dealt with by the Army and mines being the Navy’s specialty.


    Additional Information:

    Babington was born in China.

    Later promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Commander.

    Also awarded a OBE in 1943 for gallantry.

    Babington became a teacher after the war and the Headmaster of Diss Grammar School and the Royal Hospital School.
     
  15. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Raymond Mayhew Lewin

    Title/Rank: Sergeant

    Unit/Occupation: 109 Squadron and 148 Squadron (Wellington Flight, Malta). Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 3rd November 1940, Malta

    The citation in the London Gazette of 11th March 1941, gives the following particulars:

    In November, 1940, Sergeant Lewin was the captain of an aircraft on a night bombing mission. Shortly after the take off the aircraft began to sink and crashed into a hillside where it burst into flames. Sergeant Lewin extricated himself and saw three of his crew of four climbing out of the escape hatch. He ordered them to run clear. He then ran round the blazing wing in which full petrol tanks were burning and crawled under it to rescue his injured second pilot. Despite his own injuries - a cracked kneecap and severe contusions on the face and legs - he dragged and carried the pilot some 40 yards from the aircraft to a hole in the ground, where he lay on him just as the bombs exploded. This superbly gallant deed was performed in the dark under most difficult conditions and in the certain knowledge that the bombs and petrol tanks would explode.


    Additional Information:

    Lewin joined the RAFVR in 1936.

    Lewin was commissioned in 1941 to Pilot Officer.

    Lewin was killed in 1942.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]
    London Road Cemetery, Kettering
     
  16. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    William Marsdel Eastman

    Title/Rank: Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Army Ordnance Corps (Bomb Disposal)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 6th November 1940, Malta

    The citation in the London Gazette of 24th December 1940, gives the following particulars:

    No citation found.

    Circumstances of Eastman’s George Cross:

    During the German and Italian attacks on Malta in 1940 Eastman along with another GC recipient, Jephson-Jones dealt with no less than 275 bombs between them due to Malta not having a Royal Engineers Bomb Disposal unit at this stage of the war.


    Additional Information:

    Later promoted to Brigadier

    After the war Eastman commanded the RAOC Training Centre.

    Eastman retired to Malta in 1966.
     
  17. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Robert Llewellyn Jephson-Jones

    Title/Rank: Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Army Ordnance Corps (Bomb Disposal)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 6th November 1940, Malta

    The citation in the London Gazette of 24th December 1940, gives the following particulars:

    No citation found.

    Circumstances of Jephson-Jones’s George Cross:

    During the German and Italian attacks on Malta in 1940 Jephson-Jones’s along with another GC recipient, Eastman dealt with no less than 275 bombs between them due to Malta not having a Royal Engineers Bomb Disposal unit at this stage of the war.


    Additional Information:

    Later promoted to Brigadier

    Jephson-Jones was a regular soldier who went to Sandhurst in 1923 and was commissioned into the Duke of Wellington's Regiment in 1925.

    Jephson-Jones was Adjutant of the 6th Nigerian Regiment in 1932-4 and then transferred to the RAOC in 1936.
     
  18. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Harold Reginald Newgass

    Title/Rank: Temporary Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (Bomb Disposal)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 28th November 1940, Garston Gas works, Liverpool

    The citation in the London Gazette of 4th March 1941, gives the following particulars:

    No citation found.

    Circumstances of Newgass’s George Cross:

    On 28th November 1940 a landmine penetrated a gasholder. The mine was suspended by its parachute with gas escaping from the hole in the roof. Newgass tackled the mine alone with the aid of six bottles of Oxygen due to the escaping gas and stale air. The first cylinder was used whilst he did a reconnaissance of the mines location, cylinder two was used whilst carrying a ladder and his tools to the scene. No.3 was used sandbagging the nose of the mine and securing the mine to the roof of the structure. Cylinder four was used whilst Newgass turned the mine to get access to the fuse components. He left and returned with cylinder five to loosen the timing clock. Now the mine was rendered safe and No.6 was used to withdraw from the gasometer.



    Additional Information:

    Newgrass was a member of the Royal Artillery TA from 1918 to 1934.

    Later promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Commander.
     
  19. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    William Radenhurst Mosedale

    Title/Rank: Station Officer & Rescue Officer

    Unit/Occupation: Birmingham Fire Brigade

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: On the night of 12th December 1940, Birmingham

    The citation in the London Gazette of 28th March 1941, gives the following particulars:

    An Auxiliary Fire Station was completely demolished by a very large high explosive bomb. A number of Auxiliary Firemen were trapped in the station and civilians were buried in an adjoining house which had also been demolished.

    Station Officer Mosedale immediately began tunnelling and propping operations. Hundreds of tons of debris covered the site and Mosedale fully realised that at any moment he might be buried by a further collapse.

    When the first tunnel was completed and the Control Room reached, he found that there were still men whom he could not extricate. He carried out another tunnelling operation from a different direction and again entered the Control Room. Five men were found, one dead, the others injured.

    The Station Officer crawled through to the men and administered oxygen to the injured men and they were then taken out through the tunnel.

    The entrance to the cellar of the private house was full of debris. Station Officer Mosedale directed operations for removing this, only to find that the cellar itself had collapsed. He nevertheless persevered and, after a time, reached seven people who were trapped. Three had been killed outright when the roof collapsed. He gave oxygen to the remaining four and succeeded in extricating them.

    To reach other victims it was again necessary to tunnel, and Mosedale immediately commenced this work. The dangers to be faced were similar to those which he had found in reaching the Control Room. He nevertheless completed the tunnel and entered the cellar under the Fire Station. Four men who were alive were given oxygen and, despite their injuries, were safely removed.

    Tunnelling through such difficult material had necessarily been extremely, 'hazardous, and the cellar collapsed completely, shortly after the removal of the last victim.

    These operations, which lasted more than twelve hours, were carried out under a most intense bombardment. Twelve lives were saved by Station Officer Mosedale who showed outstanding gallantry and resource. In effecting the rescues he repeatedly risked his own life.


    Additional Information:

    In 1910 Mosedale joined the 5th Royal Irish Lancers

    Within three years he had been promoted to Corporal.

    He then left the service to look after a grandparent after his parents died.
     
  20. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Michael Floud Blaney

    Title/Rank: 2nd Lieutenant (acting Captain)

    Unit/Occupation: Corps of Royal Engineers

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: Irish

    Date and Place of GC Action: 18th September & 13th December 1940, Manor Park, Essex

    The citation in the London Gazette of 15th April 1941, gives the following particulars:

    No citation found.

    Circumstances of Blaney’s George Cross:

    Three separate dated were cited for Blaney’s George Cross. Firstly he removed a bomb from near a major road junction in September.

    The second incident in October was when a bomb had failed to explode in the same area but this bomb had two timed fuses and Blaney worked alone as he insisted when undertaking a specific task for the first time.

    Sadly the third occasion was to cost Blaney his life on 13th December. For him to be able to work on this particular bomb is had to be hauled out of the hole it was in. When it eventually became exposed Blaney approached it to steady the bomb as it was swaying. Just has he reached the bomb it exploded. The bomb could not have been in a worse position exposed above the ground. It also killed another officer Lieutenant James, Staff Sergeant Roberts, a Lance Corporal, five Sappers, and a Police Superintendant.


    Additional Information:

    Blaney was an Engineer in Ireland before the war.

    Blaney joined RE bomb disposal group 5th December 1940.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page