All The George Crosses of World War Two

Discussion in 'General' started by Drew5233, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Edward Donald Parker

    Title/Rank: Pilot Officer

    Unit/Occupation: 61 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

    Awarded: Initially an EGM and changed to a GC at Buckingham Palace on 23rd September 1941.

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 8th June 1940, North Carlton, 4 miles NNW of Lincoln.

    The citation in the London Gazette of 6th August 1940, gives the following particulars:

    On the night of June 8th, 1940, this officer was first pilot of an aircraft detailed for bombing operations. Just after taking off in complete darkness the port engine failed. Displaying great coolness Pilot Officer Parker immediately raised the undercarriage and tried to fly straight on, but found that he could gain neither height nor speed with his heavily loaded aircraft on only one engine. Reducing speed to 80 mph he switched off his engine and felt the aircraft into the nearest field in complete darkness. The aircraft crashed however and immediately burst into flames. Pilot Officer Parker jumped out and got clear to find that his navigator and air gunner were safe but the wireless operator was lying stunned near the burning aircraft.

    With complete disregard for his own personal safety and knowing there were four 500lb bombs in the wreckage, which might explode any moment, he returned and carried his wireless operator to a place of safety. During this action one of the bombs exploded and Pilot Officer Parker saved the airman further injury by throwing him to the ground. This officer displayed exceptional coolness, resourcefulness and courage throughout and in face of extreme danger, undoubtedly saved the life of his wireless operator.


    Additional Information:

    Parker was also awarded a DFC.

    Parker was later promoted to Squadron Leader.

    The aircraft took off from Scampton but crash landed on the top of Carlton Hill.

    All four crew members sustained injuries of varying severity.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:


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    Berlin 1939-1945 War Cemetery
     
  2. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    John Henry Farr

    Title/Rank: Mr.

    Unit/Occupation: Foundry Man

    Awarded: Date unknown. Initially an EGM and changed to a GC.

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 1940, Slough, Buckinghamshire

    The citation in the London Gazette of 26th July 1940, gives the following particulars:

    When an explosion occurred recently at a factory in the South of England, he displayed exceptional bravery and devotion to duty. In spite of the grave danger due to molten metal and the risk of electrocution from the loose high tension cables, he removed a colleague from the danger zone. He then returned into the foundry with his brother Douglas. Between them they cleared two large furnaces each containing 1,000lbs of molten aluminium. Farr and his brother volunteered for that duty in spite of falling debris, the dangerous condition of the structure and roof, and in complete darkness. As a result of their voluntary efforts, the plant was restored to production days sooner than would otherwise have been the case.


    Additional Information:

    His Brother William Douglas Farr was awarded The Medal of the Civil Division of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire.
     
  3. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

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    Edward Womersley Reynolds

    Title/Rank: Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: 101 & 102 Bomb Disposal Sections, Corps of Royal Engineers

    Awarded: Date unknown. Initially an EGM and changed to a GC.

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 17th August 1940. Bristol

    The citation in the London Gazette of 17th September 1940, gives the following particulars:

    On 17th August, 1940, a 250 kilo bomb fell in a garden amongst some council houses; it did not explode and Lieut. Reynolds was sent to investigate. On digging down 17 ft. he found that it had a new type of fuse about which no instructions had at that time been received. Finding that traffic was suspended on the road and that the inhabitants had had to be cleared out of their houses, he removed the fuse and found that it had a clockwork delayed action. The risk that he took was great, and merit of his action was the greater for lack of exact knowledge of the type of fuse he was dealing with.

    On 3rd September 1940 a large bomb fell in a street just before, midnight on September 1st; 1940; it wrecked the front of some business premises and was supposed to have exploded. About 16.30 hours on the 3rd September, a 250 kilo unexploded bomb was found in the debris. Lieut. Reynolds was at once summoned, found that it had a clockwork fuse which was still ticking and according to orders applied to Regional H.Q. for instructions suggesting that the sooner it was dealt with the better, and stating that he was willing to do so forthwith. In view of the damage to property that would have been caused by the explosion of such a large bomb in such a congested area and especially of the possible effect on the public morale permission was given and Lieut. Reynolds immediately extracted the fuse and rendered the bomb inoperative. The risk in doing this was very considerable.


    Additional Information:

    Later promoted to Major.
     
  4. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    William John Button

    Title/Rank: Lance-Sergeant

    Unit/Occupation: No. 48 Bomb Disposal Section, Corps of Royal Engineers

    Awarded: Date unknown. Initially an EGM and changed to a GC.

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 18th August 1940

    The citation in the London Gazette of 17th September 1940, gives the following particulars:

    On the morning of 18th August 1940, Lance Sergeant Button was ordered with his section to continue the work of excavating an unexploded bomb. Although he knew well that owing to the time already spent on excavation, the bomb was likely to explode at any moment, he continued working with his section with great coolness. The bomb eventually exploded, killing five sappers of the section and throwing Lance-Sergeant Button a considerable distance. Although shaken, he collected the rest of his section, ascertained that none of them were injured, notified the First Aid Detachment and then reported to his Section Officer.


    Additional Information:

    For his actions Lance Sergeant W.J. Button was awarded the Empire Gallantry Medal, later this was exchanged for the George Cross.

    Only civilian to receive both George Cross and George Medal.
     
  5. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Ellis Edward Arthur Chetwynd Talbot

    Title/Rank: Second Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: 103 Bomb Disposal Section, Corps of Royal Engineers

    Awarded: Date unknown. Initially an EGM and changed to a GC.

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 24th/25th August 1940

    The citation in the London Gazette of 17th September 1940, gives the following particulars:

    On 24th - 25th August 1940 Lieut. Talbot after being present for the whole time (12 hours) taken to dig down to an unexploded bomb, diagnosed, on the bomb being brought to the surface, that it was of the delay action type and ordered his men to a safe distance while he examined it.

    As the bomb appeared to be of a new type, Lieut. Talbot decided to remove it to a place where it could do no damage if it exploded. Still keeping his men under cover, he carried the bomb on his shoulder for some 200 yards and placed it in a safe spot. From the start of the work there was a risk of the bomb going off and Lieut. Talbot set a fine example of courage and devotion to duty.



    Additional Information:

    Also awarded an MBE.

    Later promoted to Lieutenant

    Talbot was killed in an aircraft accident off Capo Alessio, Sicily 1941.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:


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    Catania War Cemetery
     
  6. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Wallace Launcelot Andrews

    Title/Rank: Second Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: 22/23 Bomb Disposal Sections, Corps of Royal Engineers

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 26th August 1940 near Croydon, Surrey

    The citation in the London Gazette of 17th September 1940, gives the following particulars:

    On 26th August 1940, Second Lieutenant Andrews was in charge of No.22 and 23 Bomb Disposal Sections, Royal Engineers. While trying to extract the fuse of a bomb in order to forward it to the D.S.R., some difficulty was experienced. After withdrawing it about ii inches the fuse dropped back into position actuated by what appeared to be magnetism or-a spring. Removal was attempted several times without success. Second Lieutenant Andrews then placed his section under cover, and after tying a piece of cord to the ring of the fuse discharger, pulled, with the result that the bomb exploited. He was blown a considerable distance, and two of the men received splinter wounds. Throughout, Second Lieutenant Andrews displayed great coolness and keenness in the interests of the Service.


    Additional Information:

    The Gazette lists the award as a Military OBE for Gallantry. This was probably due to the George Cross being instituted the same month.

    Before the War Andrews’s qualified as an architect.

    Granted an emergency commission on 14th January 1940 and joined the Bomb Disposal Company.

    Later promoted to Major.

    In 1976, the family offered to sell Andrews’s medal to the Royal Engineers Museum.

    The Royal Engineers Museum declined and it is now believed to be in a private collection.


    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

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    St. Mary's Cemetery, Taunton
     
  7. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Eric Lawrence Moxey

    Title/Rank: Acting Squadron Leader

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 27 August 1940, Biggin Hill Aerodrome

    The citation in the London Gazette of 13th December 1940, gives the following particulars:

    On the 27th August, 1940, it was reported that two unexploded bombs were embedded in an aerodrome. Squadron Leader Moxey, a technical intelligence officer employed at the Air Ministry, immediately volunteered to proceed to the site and remove them though from the nature of his duties he was very fully aware of the risk entailed in such an operation. One of the bombs exploded causing his death. On many occasions Squadron Leader Moxey has exhibited similar complete disregard for his personal safety.



    Additional Information:

    Born in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    Moxey served in the Yorkshire and Lancashire Regiment and the Royal Flying Corps during WW1.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:


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    Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, Orpington, Kent
     
  8. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Thomas Hopper Alderson

    Title/Rank: Detachment Leader

    Unit/Occupation: Detachment Leader,ARP

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: August 1940, Bridlington, Yorkshire

    The citation in the London Gazette of 30th September 1940, gives the following particulars:

    A pair of semi-detached houses at Bridlington was totally demolished in a recent air raid. One woman was trapped alive. Alderson tunnelled under unsafe wreckage and rescued the trapped person without further injury to her.

    Some days later, two five-storey buildings were totally demolished and debris penetrated into a cellar in which eleven persons were trapped. Six persons in one cellar, which had completely given way, were buried under debris. Alderson partly effected entrance to this cellar by tunnelling 13 to 14 feet under the main heap of wreckage and for three and a half hours he worked unceasingly in an exceedingly cramped condition. Although considerably bruised he succeeded in releasing all the trapped persons without further injury to themselves.

    The wreckage was unsafe and further falls were anticipated; coal gas leaks were of a serious nature and there was danger of flooding from fractured water pipes. Despite these dangers and enemy aircraft overhead the rescue work was continued.

    On a third occasion some four-storey buildings were totally demolished. Five persons were trapped in a cellar. Alderson led the rescue work in excavating a tunnel from the pavement through the foundations to the cellar; he also personally tunnelled under the wreckage many feet into the cellar and rescued alive two persons (one of whom subsequently died) from under a massive refrigerator, which was in danger of further collapse as debris was removed.

    A wall, three storeys high, which swayed in the gusty wind, was directly over the position where the rescue party were working. This was likely to collapse at any moment.

    Alderson worked almost continuously under the wreckage for five hours, during which time further air raid warnings were received and enemy aircraft heard overhead.

    By his courage and devotion to duty without the slightest regard for his own safety, he set a fine example to the members of his Rescue Party, and their team work is worthy of the highest praise.


    Additional Information:

    Alderson joined the Merchant Navy and was promoted to First Engineer

    He left the Navy in 1935 and became an engineer for Hartlepool Council.

    This was the first George Cross to be Gazetted.

    Alderson was the first person to receive a George Cross from the King.
     
  9. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Vivian Hollowday

    Title/Rank: Aircraftman First Class

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Air Force

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: August 1940, Cranfield, Bedfordshire

    The citation in the London Gazette of 21st January 1941, gives the following particulars:

    One night in July, 1940, when returning to camp, this airman observed an aircraft crash and burst into flames. He immediately proceeded to the wreckage and made his way through the burning debris which was scattered over a wide area by the force of the impact. He found the pilot whose clothing was on fire, and put out the flames with his bare hands. Had the pilot not been killed instantly in the crash this action would in all probability have saved his life.

    During August, 1940, this airman was again returning to the camp when an aircraft suddenly spun to the ground and exploded. He immediately went to the crash and a second explosion occurred. Ammunition was exploding all the time but despite this, he borrowed a gas mask, wrapped two sacks over himself and spent some time in the flames, making four attempts before he succeeded in releasing the first occupant. He then re-entered the burning wreckage and successfully removed the second. All three occupants, however, were already dead. Aircraftman Hollowday displayed amazing courage and initiative on both occasions.



    Additional Information:

    Hollowday enlisted in 1939.

    Later Promoted to Corporal

    Hollowday went on to serve in Africa, Italy and Europe.

    He also received a MiD.

    Cremated at Bedford Crematorium, Bedfordshire. Location of ashes unknown.
     
  10. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Bertram Stuart Trevelyan Archer
    Title/Rank: Acting Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: Bomb Disposal, Royal Engineers

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 2nd September 1940, Near Swansea

    The citation in the London Gazette of 30th September 1941, gives the following particulars:

    On the 15 July 1940, four 250 kilogram bombs were dropped on St Athan aerodrome, South Wales, two of them within 10 yards of some vitally important assembly sheds. Lieutenant Archer immediately went to the scene and the first bomb was excavated. As its fuse was expected to be booby trapped, it was loaded, with the fuse still in, on to a lorry. Lieutenant Archer himself drove the lorry to a site some two miles away and the bomb was detonated. The other bomb was dealt with in the same way.

    On the 17 August 1940, at Moulton South Wales, a further 250 kilogram bomb was excavated down to the fuse pocket, which contained a number 50 fuse. As this fuse was required for War Office experiments an attempt was made to extract it. When this failed, Lieutenant Archer removed it by hand by means of a pick head; although well aware of that the fuse might be a booby trap.

    On 27 August 1940 at Port Talbot docks this officer was instrumental in recovering the first number of fuses for experimental purposes.



    Additional Information:

    Also awarded an OBE and Two Bars and ERD.

    Later promoted to Lt. Colonel.

    Archer spent his life before and after the war working as an architect.

    Before joining the Royal Engineers Archer was in the Honourable Royal Artillery Company.
     
  11. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Albert Ernest Dolphin

    Title/Rank: Emergency Hospital Service Porter

    Unit/Occupation: South Eastern Hospital, New Cross, London

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action:The evening of 7th September 1940, South Eastern Hospital, New Cross, South London

    The citation in the London Gazette of 17th January 1941, gives the following particulars:

    A high explosive bomb fell on the kitchens of Ward Block I at the South Eastern Hospital, killing four nurses who were in the ground floor kitchen and injuring the night Sister and patients in the adjoining ward. A nurse, who was in the ward kitchen on the first floor, was thrown through the collapsing floor into the passage below. Together with other helpers, Albert Ernest Dolphin, one of the porters of the hospital, rushed to the site and found her pinioned by a block of masonry across her legs. While they were working the wall was heard to crack and subsequently collapsed. The workers had ample time to jump clear before the masonry fell, but Dolphin remained where he was and his body was subsequently found lying face downwards across the nurse with his head towards the wall which collapsed on top of him. When found he was dead, but the nurse, who was subsequently extricated, was still alive, though severely injured. There is no doubt that Dolphin, although aware that the wall was about to collapse, deliberately remained where he was and threw himself across the nurse's body in an endeavour to protect her. This he succeeded in doing at the cost of his own life.



    Additional Information:

    Dolphin was born in Bermondsey, South East London.

    This was the first George Cross awarded to a civilian.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:

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  12. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Dr Arthur Douglas Merriman

    Title/Rank: Part-time Experimental Officer

    Unit/Occupation: Directorate of Scientific Research, Ministry of Supply (Bomb Disposal)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 11th September 1940, Regent Street, London

    The citation in the London Gazette of 3rd December 1940, gives the following particulars:

    Arthur Douglas Merriman, Part-time Experimental Officer, Directorate of Scientific Research, Ministry of Supply. For conspicuous bravery in connection with bomb disposal.


    Additional Information:

    Also awarded DFC and OBE.

    A bomb dropped on Regent Street and Merriman along with the Director General of Scientific Research they proceeded to disarm the bomb. At one point the mechanism started ticking but they continued to remove most of the explosive from the bomb before it exploded. At the last possible minute both men retreated. When the bomb detonated, it caused minimal damage in the area breaking several windows.

    In 1941 Merriman was commissioned as a second Lieutenant and was given the acting rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

    Merriman is remembered by a Memorial in Streatham Cemetery.
     
  13. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Robert Davies

    Title/Rank: Temporary Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Engineers (Bomb Disposal)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 12th September 1940, St. Paul's, London

    The citation in the London Gazette of 30th September 1940, gives the following particulars:

    Temporary Lieutenant Robert Davies, Royal Engineers. Lieutenant Davies was the officer in charge of the party detailed to recover the bomb which fell in the vicinity of St. Paul's Cathedral.

    So conscious was this officer of the imminent danger to the Cathedral that regardless of personal risk he spared neither himself nor his men in their efforts to locate the bomb. After unremitting effort, during which all ranks knew that an explosion might occur at any moment, the bomb was successfully extricated.

    In order to shield his men from further danger, Lieutenant Davies himself drove the vehicle in which the bomb was removed and personally carried out its disposal.


    Additional Information:

    Davies Immigrated to Canada during WW1 and joined the Canadian Army in 1918.

    Davies returned to Great Britain in 1930

    Davies joined the Royal Engineers in 1940.

    Sapper Wyllie was also awarded the GC for his part in the same action.

    Sergeant Wilson and Lance-Corporal Leigh were awarded the BEM for their part in this action.

    The bomb Davies defused was lodged some 30 feet deep in Deans Yard, London.

    The team worked for several days to dig it out, and the bomb was finally transported to, and detonated on Hackney Marsh.

    In 1970 The Times reported Davies’s GC was sold for a then record £2,100.

    It is currently on display in the Imperial War Museum.
     
  14. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    George Cameron Wylie

    Title/Rank: Sapper

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Engineers (Bomb Disposal)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action:12th September 1940, St. Paul's, London

    The citation in the London Gazette of 30th September 1940, gives the following particulars:

    Sapper Wyllie was a member of the Bomb Disposal Section engaged upon the recovery of the bomb which fell in the neighbourhood of St. Paul's Cathedral.

    The actual discovery and removal of the bomb fell to him. Sapper Wylie's untiring energy, courage, and disregard for danger were an outstanding example to his comrades.

    Additional Information:

    Later promoted to the rank of Corporal.

    Lieutenant Davies was also awarded the GC for his part in the same action.

    Sergeant Wilson and Lance-Corporal Leigh were awarded the BEM for their part in this action.

    The 2,000 Kg bomb was lodged some 30 feet deep in Deans Yard, London.

    Its recovery was made all the harder by a burning fractured gas main.

    The team worked for several days to dig it out, and the bomb was finally transported to, and detonated on Hackney Marsh.


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    Davies, Wylie, Wilson, Leigh and the rest of the crew.
     
  15. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Harry Errington

    Title/Rank: Fireman

    Unit/Occupation: Auxiliary Fire Service

    Awarded: August 8th, 1941

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 17th September 1940, London

    The citation in the London Gazette of 8th August 1941, gives the following particulars:

    High explosive and incendiary bombs demolished a building. Errington and two other Auxiliary firemen were the only occupants of the basement of the building at the time of the explosion. The blast blew Errington across the basement, but although dazed and injured he made his way to the other two Auxiliaries, whom found to be pinned down, flat on their backs, by debris. A fierce fire broke out and the trapped men were in imminent danger of being burnt to death. The heat of the fire was so intense that Errington had to protect himself with a blanket. After working with his bare hands for some minutes he managed to release the injured men and dragged them from under the wreckage and away from the fire.

    While he was so engaged, burning debris was falling into the basement and there was considerable danger of further collapse of the building. He carried one of the men up a narrow stone staircase partially choked with debris, into the courtyard, made his way through an adjoining building and thence into the street.

    Despite the appalling conditions and although burned and injured, Errington returned and brought out the second man.

    Both Errington's comrades were severely burned but survived. He showed great bravery and endurance in effecting the rescues, at risk of his own life.



    Additional Information:

    Errington was born of Jewish Polish Immigrants.

    Errington served voluntarily with the AFS at London Station Shaftesbury Avenue until 1945.

    He was the only London Fireman that was awarded with the George Cross.

    Errington had a keen interest in Basketball.

    Errington was involved in the organisation of the Basketball tournament in the 1948 Olympic Games in London.
     
  16. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Roy Thomas Harris

    Title/Rank: Staff Officer

    Unit/Occupation: ARP Engineers Service (Bomb Disposal), Croydon

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 18th September 1940, Thornton Heath, Surrey

    The citation in the London Gazette of 17th December 1940, gives the following particulars:

    No citation listed or found.

    Circumstances of Harris’s George Medal:

    Harris was awarded a George Cross for dismantling several bombs in Langdale Road School, Thornton Heath near Croydon, Surrey on 18th September 1940 despite having little knowledge of these devices.


    Additional Information:

    At the time of Harris’s action he was a Captain in The Queen’s Royal Regiment attached to the Home Guard.

    Later Harris joined the Royal Engineers where he achieved the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.
     
  17. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    John MacMillan Stevenson Patton

    Title/Rank: Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: 1st Battalion, Corps of Royal Canadian Engineers

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: Canadian

    Date and Place of GC Action:21st September 1940, Weybridge, Surrey

    The citation in the London Gazette of 17th December 1940, gives the following particulars:

    No citation listed or found.

    Circumstances of Patton’s George Cross:

    Patton having no experience in Bomb Disposal and fully aware of the immediate danger of a UXB in the Vickers Factory, he managed to move it onto a skid and then attached it to the rear of a vehicle and dragged the large bomb away from the factory to a safe distance. It was then dumped into a bomb crater where it exploded causing little to no damage in the immediate area.


    Additional Information:

    A distant relative of General George S. Patton.

    Also awarded a CBE.

    Patton was the first Non-British recipient of the George Cross.
     
  18. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Richard Valentine Moore

    Title/Rank: Temporary Sub-Lieutenant

    Unit/Occupation: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (Bomb Disposal)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 20th September 1940, Dagenham, Essex

    The citation in the London Gazette of 27th December 1940, gives the following particulars:

    No citation found.

    Circumstances of Moore’s George Cross:

    Although Moore had no practical experience of defusing mines he was called to a incident in Essex where he successfully disarmed five mines in a row.



    Additional Information:

    Later promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Commander.

    Also awarded a CBE.

    Moore had a notable career in atomic energy after the war.
     
  19. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Richard John Hamersley Ryan

    Title/Rank: Lieutenant-Commander

    Unit/Occupation: H.M.S. President, Royal Navy (Bomb Disposal)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 21st September 1940, Dagenham, Essex

    The citation in the London Gazette of 20th December 1940, gives the following particulars:

    No citation found or listed.

    Circumstances for Ryan’s George Cross:

    Lieutenant Commander Ryan and another colleague were the first men to strip a Type C Magnetic Mine which were found in a German aircraft that crash landed near Clacton. When there was little information about Magnetic Mines Ryan would always volunteer to tackle this relatively new weapon. Tacling six of these mines on his own, one in a canal where he worked upto his waste in mud and water that would have made escape impossible if the device was activated. He made the bomb safe by feeling for the fuse and extracting it whilst it was under water.

    In another incident at Hornchurch, Essex he was working with Chief Petty Officer Ellingworth where they disabled a device threatening a aerodrome and explosives factory. From there Ryan was working with CPO Ellingworth when they were both awarded the George Cross Posthumously. They attended a warehouse in Essex where they found a magnetic mine suspended by its parachute. Both were killed instantly when attempting to render the mine safe.



    Additional Information:

    Ryan joined the Royal Navy in the early 1920s

    His father was Admiral Frank Edward Cavendish Ryan.

    Ryan was awarded the George Cross posthumously.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:


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    Haslar Royal Naval Cemetery
     
  20. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Reginald Vincent Ellingworth

    Title/Rank: Chief Petty Officer

    Unit/Occupation: H.M.S. President, Royal Navy (Bomb Disposal)

    Awarded: Date unknown

    Nationality: British

    Date and Place of GC Action: 21st September 1940, Dagenham, Essex

    The citation in the London Gazette of 20th December 1940, gives the following particulars:

    No citation listed or found.

    Circumstances of Ellingworth’s George Cross:

    Ellingworth was working with Lt. Cdr. Ryan when they were both awarded the George Cross Posthumously. They attended a warehouse in Essex where they found a magnetic mine suspended by its parachute. Both were killed instantly when attempting to render the mine safe.


    Additional Information:

    Ellingworth was awarded the George Cross posthumously.

    Ellingworth is buried in Portsmouth.

    CWGC :: Certificate :poppy:


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    Milton Cemetery, Portsmouth
     

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