1st Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers 1940

Discussion in '1940' started by jaxnkelly, Oct 17, 2012.

  1. bexley84

    bexley84 Well-Known Member

    Mike,

    Sgt Jackson, being a platoon commander in A Coy, and Major Proctor who commanded the company (from May 1943 onwards) would have been very close together in Sicily and mainland Italy including the battles at Termoli and on the Trigno on 27th October 1943...

    This is Paddy Proctor's MC citation from Termoli..

    "At TERMOLI on 6 October 43, Major Proctor was in command of A Company, partaking in a Battalion attack with a squadron of tanks on enemy positions on the high ground NORTH of San GIACOMO and along the road leading from that point towards TERMOLI. A Coy was moving in rear at the beginning of the attack but when the forward Coys were temporarily held up, Major Proctor at once moved forward on his own initiative up the right flank. Advancing very rapidly in close co-operation with the tanks he moved his Coy into a brick factory which was the first objective. This advance was made in the teeth of fierce opposition of enemy tanks and infantry but so rapid was it that the enemy were thrown off their guard and the strong point in the factory was not seriously defended.
    After a brief reorganisation, the advance was resumed with A Coy still leading, Opposition from enemy tanks and MGs were encountered but rapidly overcome and by 1530 hours the final objective, Pt 161, was gained and the enemy driven off leaving several wounded prisoners in our hands.
    Major Proctor’s work has been consistently of a high order. His leadership and personal example has instilled a high morale into his Coy and his sound judgment has been responsible for many successful actions in the field." (WO 373/4).

    Faugh a Ballagh
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Kennedysv

    Kennedysv New Member

    Perhaps inspired by remembrance day, I've been spending a few interesting hours researching my Grandfather, Major Patrick Proctor and came upon your post. I am the youngest daughter of his only daughter, Valerie Proctor. My grandmother Mary didn't talk much about her husband and we don't have any artefacts or pictures. Although I knew he was awarded the Military Cross, I only found out today that he was awarded it on 6th October 1943 for his role in the battles around Termoli and that he died only a few week later. My, grandmother only died three years ago and bequeathed all Paddy's medals to her only great-grandson, my son Patrick.
     
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  3. hubbar1949

    hubbar1949 Member

    Just a (educated?) guess: They were billieted in these village during the Phoney War, as Hellemes is now in Villeneuve d'Ascq, close to Lille, on the Eastern side of that BIG city!
    In Belgium, during the "mobilisation" (the full army was put on war foot) the soldiers were billieted in farms along the Meuse river. The 1st Division of Chasseurs Ardennais were in the Ardennes, close to the german border. They had to process demolition works (timber across narrow forest roads, blowing up of the bridges, crateering of the road), then, retreat to the Meuse river.

    hubbar49
     
  4. bexley84

    bexley84 Well-Known Member

    Michael,

    Reviewing the thread,

    I note that the CWGC have now updated their records to include the Military Medal within Sgt Jackson's entry - i presume the headstone at the Sangro River CWGC cemetery has also been updated by now. Also, as he has an Royal Ulster Rifles' (RUR) Army Number it's possible that during his time in France, he may well have been serving with the RUR, transferring to the Faughs later.
    http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2375333/JACKSON,%20WILLIAM%20JOHN

    Separately, with respect to Major Proctor, it is also noted that he was commissioned into the RUR and had joined up with the Faughs in Tunisia during late April 1943....they certainly needed men after the desperately hard fighting in the jebels north of Medjez. It's good that the family connections and a fuller understanding can be passed on into the long ahead future,

    Quote above:
    "Perhaps inspired by remembrance day, I've been spending a few interesting hours researching my Grandfather, Major Patrick Proctor and came upon your post. I am the youngest daughter of his only daughter, Valerie Proctor. My grandmother Mary didn't talk much about her husband and we don't have any artefacts or pictures. Although I knew he was awarded the Military Cross, I only found out today that he was awarded it on 6th October 1943 for his role in the battles around Termoli and that he died only a few week later. My, grandmother only died three years ago and bequeathed all Paddy's medals to her only great-grandson, my son Patrick."

    thanks
     
  5. bexley84

    bexley84 Well-Known Member

    From the history of 2 RUR during 1939/1940 - which might indeed suggest an explicit RUR connection for Sgt Jackson during his time in France:

    "...On October 3rd the Battalion entrained at Sherborne, de-trained at Southampton, and, seven hundred and seventeen strong, went on board “Mona's Queen”-a small, elderly Isle of Man boat, appallingly crowded and with no facilities for supplying hot meals. The crossing to Cherbourg was cold, wet and rough. Many of the men were seasick, but recovered sufficiently to take part in a salle de fete two miles from the docks shortly after their arrival. That evening the Battalion entrained again and, after a night journey, detrained at Silly-le-Guillaume, marching thence to Parennes. The billets were comfortable, but somewhat scattered. Major-General Montgomery, Commanding the 3rd Division, paid a visit; the Battalion was not destined to remain there long. It entrained a few days later for Templemars, which it reached on October 12th. Once again the billets were good, but scattered.

    Two days later came the final move before May 10th. This was to Lezennes-a suburb of Lille, chiefly notable for the astonishing labyrinths of ancient underground passages which were said to extend all the way into Belgium. One or two reconnaissances were made at an early stage, but it was soon decided that they were not only dangerous in themselves, but, in action, could prove a real deathtrap..."
     
  6. jaxnkelly

    jaxnkelly Junior Member

    Hello Bexley84

    Just looked back at this after my cousin asked about granddad. i hadn't seen your last posts about the RUR. That gives me something else to look into now.

    Thank you.
     
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  7. victor waghorn

    victor waghorn New Member

    My name is victor my mother was Ann Patricia Jackson born in 1935 and my nan her mother was Florence Jackson of Dublin ney Bone I understand that sgt william john jackson was my grandad and my mother and sisters travelled to sangro cemetery in the 80s to see his grave.
     
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  8. jaxnkelly

    jaxnkelly Junior Member

    Hello Victor sorry for the slow response.
    Ann was my aunt. Im the son or Ann's brother Martin
     

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