1939 Register - now online

Discussion in 'Research Material' started by Red Goblin, Mar 12, 2015.

  1. Red Goblin

    Red Goblin Senior Member

    Many of you have been eagerly awaiting this but probably won't have expected it to be made available so soon ... but it was announced, yesterday, as per this RSS item:
    I'm off to my local library to check this out now ... :D

    Steve

    PS: Just got back - gutted - I hate hype - and it isn't even 1st April yet !!! So I'll just have to apologise that, as yet, this is so much BS vapourware - grr :mad: Now comes the wait ... :pipe:
     
    Tricky Dicky, Paul Reed and Mr Jinks like this.
  2. Paul Reed

    Paul Reed Ubique MOD

    Am surprised there has been so little publicity for this, thanks for the heads-up.
     
  3. Paul Reed

    Paul Reed Ubique MOD

    Update - Just had a look at the site as I'm a subscriber. It is not possible to search as yet.
     
  4. Red Goblin

    Red Goblin Senior Member

    That, Paul, is why I coloured their far too woolly clue to its true status red when I added my PS - wonder how the ASA would view that as I'd hoped, like their staggered 1911 census release, they'd have at least made something, if only a sample of their work so far, available by now. This search reveals how disinclined TNA are to jump the gun - unlike FMP's Jim Shaughnessy.

    BTW, you don't even need to be registered to search FMP - I simply didn't bother testing it from home because I was already on my way out to download some inbound passenger lists c/o Ancestry Library Edition.

    Steve
     
  5. Drayton

    Drayton Senior Member

    I have rarely seen such unhelpful publicity. Although it is made clear that the National Register was not a census, it is described as if it might have been some kind of census, with no explanation of the actual way in which it was used.

    The primary purpose of the Register was to facilitate the issue of National Identity Cards, each recording a personal National Registration Number, itself comprising four letters indicating residential location at date of registration, followed by digits indicating a household unit, followed by a stroke and then a digit indicating the subject's place in the hierarchical order of the household (eg ABCD 123/1).

    Identity cards were a (relatively primitive) way of keeping tabs on people, but, importantly, they were the key to the issue of a personal ration book for basic foods (and, later, for clothing).

    Identity cards and National Registration continued after the war (the ending in the early 1950s is technically outside the scope of WW2Talk), but, specifically, National Registration Numbers were adopted for use by the National Health Service from its founding on Monday 5 July 1948, each patient, on registering with a particular GP, receiving a card bearing what was now called a National Health Service Number.
     
    RosyRedd likes this.
  6. Red Goblin

    Red Goblin Senior Member

    Hmm, I just rediscovered a year-old link to the official website - 1939 Register | The National Archives | powered by findmypast - currently conservatively saying, "The 1939 Register is being digitised and will be published within the next two years."

    The contractor's new home-grown Find My Past | 1939 Register | findmypast.co.uk flavour, on the other hand, says "In 2015, for the first time, Findmypast in partnership with The National Archives are publishing the 1939 Register online".

    Anyone else detect 'odd couple' disharmony :icon_smile_blackeye :box2: ?
     
  7. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    I spoke to Ancestry and asked them why they do not have this is due on their system soon and the reply was basically that FMP put in a higher bid than them to have access to the documents.

    So its like a TV bidding war, the one that has the most money has access to the files. Ancestry expect that they will have it in their system probably in a couple of years.
    So members on here with subscriptions to FMP may find themselves inundated with requests, unless we all subscribe to FMP of course :(

    TD
     
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  8. bofors

    bofors Senior Member

    Hi

    What about Scotland? Is it not included? That is what I want!

    regards

    Robert
     
  9. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    Hi Robert

    I think you will find that since the early 1900's/1910's Scotland has kept its own records to itself - amberdog45 is a member who lives in Scotland and is fairly au fait with the situation there re records etc.

    I assume they have their own records office??

    TD
     
  10. chick42-46

    chick42-46 Senior Member

  11. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

  12. bofors

    bofors Senior Member

    HI

    Thanks for the information, pity it is not on Scotlands People, the cost is a bit steep!
    With the form, how do they find people, for example my Grandfather was William Simpson, I know his date of death (have extract from SP), but not birth, so how would they trace back to get the right person in 1939?

    regards
    Robert
     
  13. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    Perhaps you need to contact the NA in Edinburgh and pose the question to them :mellow:

    TD
     
  14. Red Goblin

    Red Goblin Senior Member

    Re cost, BTW, the Anglo-Welsh register service charges nearly 3x as much - £42 vs £15 !

    What's even more disturbing is that this >5yo (16 Jan 2010) blog entry ...
    The Professional Descendant: 1939 National Identity Register
    ... should end ...
    ... and still no progress AFAICT - so either folk aren't moaning loudly enough or they're up against some serious resistance !

    Steve
     
  15. Red Goblin

    Red Goblin Senior Member

    A further blog entry - An explanation of redaction in the 1939 register | News | findmypast.co.uk:
    Steve
     
  16. Red Goblin

    Red Goblin Senior Member

    And another - less directly relevant but FTR - The story behind a poster - Don't do it, Mother! | News | findmypast.co.uk:
    Steve

    PS: Worth, having just watched it however, cross-referencing to A Tribute To Women - British Pathé as just drawn to my attention by dbf's A Tribute To Women 1945: British Pathe film - United Kingdom - WW2 Talk
     
  17. Red Goblin

    Red Goblin Senior Member

    FMP's latest related blog entry ...
    ... which I'll not even bother quoting as their spin doctors seem to be already scraping the barrel to maintain interest with it. It seems they're now desperately trying to compensate for waning interest in their WW1 records and the above article's reliance on nostalgic-but-clichéd icons like 'The Wizard of Oz' strongly reminds me of that film's classic 'smoke & mirrors' line, "Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain." And in the same blarney vein I'm also reminded of the professor in 'Bud Tucker in Double Trouble' repeatedly saying, "cut the chat and give it to me" !

    Steve
     
  18. Red Goblin

    Red Goblin Senior Member

    Latest blog entry more relevant that that last foray into nostalgia ...
    Steve
     
  19. Red Goblin

    Red Goblin Senior Member

  20. Red Goblin

    Red Goblin Senior Member

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