☆rasc service record help

Discussion in 'Service Records' started by adele gervis, Apr 12, 2019.

  1. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

    please help I receive my grandad service records need help and war diary off
    9 Bedfs Herts (PTC) General service corps I can't find any Info....Army no... T/14845715. thank you any help appreciated
     
  2. Tullybrone

    Tullybrone Senior Member

    Hi,

    I think members might be able to help more if you post his records.

    PTC is an abbreviation for Primary Training Centre - a U.K. based training unit - so I doubt a ”war diary” exists- although if it does it will likely just record number of recruits received and the numbers that were posted onwards (no names will be listed).

    Steve
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2019
  3. Tullybrone

    Tullybrone Senior Member

  4. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

    thanks Steve I try post them
     
  5. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

    it wont let me at minute Steve I try later. He moved on to RASC 51 COY. (CTC)as a driver. Struggling to find info on that too..Would his military history sheet help? If I could upload that one.
     
  6. Tullybrone

    Tullybrone Senior Member

    Hi Adele,

    CTC is usually an abbreviation for Combined Training Centre - usually in the context of amphibious landing craft/Commando training units etc so I can’t help if it’s a RASC abbreviation other than to say it’ll likely be another home based training unit.

    The more original forms you are able to post the more members will be able to help you as some detail is on one form but not on any others. The most helpful forms are usually the B103 forms.

    Steve
     
  7. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

  8. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

  9. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

  10. gmyles

    gmyles Senior Member

    Hi

    Here's what I can make out.

    3rd Training Battalion - Passed driver training 29/12/44

    Posted 915 Coy RASC – 13/1/45 (Anti-Aircraft Command)

    Posted 926 Coy RASC (Anti-Aircraft Command)

    5th Anti-Aircraft Group (5 AA Grp) covered northern East Anglia and the East Coast as far as Scarborough, North Yorkshire

    Posted back to 926 Coy RASC 27/01/45 (5 AA Grp)

    Posted 912 Coy RASC 26/4/45 (General Transport (Gen Tpt))

    Embarked (left) UK = 26/4/45

    Take onto strength 21 Army Group 30/04/45

    Awarded France/Germany Star. (Only just made this as the end date for this award was 08/05/45)

    Hope this helps

    Gus
     
  11. Tullybrone

    Tullybrone Senior Member

    Hi Adele,

    The B103 is very helpful.

    I think 51 Company was his unit when he was in RASC 3rd Training Battalion.

    On completion of his training he is posted to a U.K. based 915 Company 12th January 1945 - they were part of Anti Aircraft Command.

    Here is a link to their War Diary in the National Archives.

    915 Coy. | The National Archives

    He was posted to 912 (General Transport) Company RASC on 7th April 1945 and went to NW Europe with that unit 26th April 1945 thus qualifying for the France & Germany Star.

    Steve

    EDIT TO ADD

    He was likely posted to RASC rather than infantry as his medical category was B1 on enlistment.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2019
  12. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

    That's amazing thank you
     
  13. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

    wow you guys really no your stuff. appricate it I upload the others later. blessings
     
  14. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

    what does the B1 mean?
     
  15. Tullybrone

    Tullybrone Senior Member

    Hi Adele,

    Copy and paste from elsewhere -

    These are the categories for WW1. I don't think the WW2 ones are that different:

    A: Fit for active service. A1: Fit for overseas duties, as regards physical and mental health and training. A2: As A1, except for training. A3: Returned Expeditionary Force men, ready except physically. A4: Men under 19 who would be A1 or A2 when aged 19.

    B: Free from serious organic diseases, able to stand on lines of communications in France or garrison duties in tropics. B1: Able to march 5 miles, see, shoot with glasses and hear well. B2: Able to walk 5 miles, see and hear for ordinary purposes. B3: Only suitable for sedentary work.

    C: Free from serious organic diseases, suitable for home service. C1: as B1. C2: as B2. C3: As B3.

    D: Unfit, but could be within 6 months. D1: Regular RA, RE or infantry command depots. D2: Regular RA, RE or infantry regimental depots. D3: Men in any depot or unfit awaiting treatment.

    (Cited from: Fitness Categories/Grades | Military History Forum)

    Categories changed to Canadian “Puhlems” fitness scale towards the end of the war,

    Steve
     
  16. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

    Thank you
     
  17. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

  18. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

  19. adele gervis

    adele gervis Active Member

    I uploaded the other 2 pages off b103..hope you can help with these.you Been fantastic with the others

    adele
     
  20. Tullybrone

    Tullybrone Senior Member

    Hi,

    Here is a link to 51 Company RASC

    British Army units from 1945 on - Companies 51 to 60

    The site appears to be a work in progress as I can’t see 716 Company that appears to be linked to 195 Para Field Ambulance.

    195th (Airlanding) Field Ambulance - Wikipedia

    I can see 719 Company as part of 6th Airborne Division. If you can find an order of battle for 6th Airborne in Palestine you’ll likely find 716 Company listed.

    British Army units from 1945 on - Companies 651 to 800

    He doesn’t appear to have been the best behaved soldier in Palestine with many brushes with military authorities. You may feel that being taken to task for using a unapproved route between “A and B” is a bit harsh but you need to remember they were fighting a terrorist war and many roads were mined or subject to bombing by terrorists with the result that casualties followed. In a similar vein ”failing to safeguard your firearm in a proper manner” would be frowned upon!

    I’ve attached a couple of images from my father’s time in Palestine pre WW2 to give you an idea of terrorist consequences.

    There should be an endorsement on his papers that he was awarded the Palestine 1945/48 General Service Medal - likely issued after his discharge with his WW2 medals - but if not it may be that he didn't claim his medals in which case NOK can still claim them now.


    Steve

    96303D12-D7E0-4A0F-B3BD-61121E829E57.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2019
    adele gervis and Tricky Dicky like this.

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