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#1 s dawkins

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Posted 16 September 2004 - 09:20 PM

Having just read a posting about the Raiding Support Regiment I would like to give an accurate,but brief description.I should point out that my late grandfather served in the unit and I have spent 8 years or so researching them.

The unit was formed in 1943 by Raidng Forces (Middle East/CO Brig' DJT Turnbull) and was never part of 2 SS Brigade.In fact they wore the beige beret and SAS wings and not the green beret like those of 2 SS Brigade.When operating in the Adriatic they carried out joint ops with the commandos in support of the Partisans,but were never part of the same brigade as them.Until June of 1944 they came under command of Force 266 when operating in the Adriatic and after that they and 2 SS Brigade came under the theatre command of Land Forces Adriatic.The elements of the RSR that served in the mountains of Greece giving close support to the partisans and also operating on their own came under command of Force 133.

It is worth noting that the RSR was formed primarily to give support to the SAS Special Boat Squadron,SAS Greek Sacred Squadron(both part of Raiding Forces,Middle East),Balkan Guerrillas and to operate on it's own carrying out ambushes,demolitions etc.The unit was not formed to support the Commandos it was simply that both formations were deployed in the Adriatic and so operated together.There was to be fair a few ops where RSR sub-units came under temporary command of the Commandos.The unit often operated as the close fire support group to the partisans and in fact a few members of the RSR undertook basic Yugoslav language courses(this is mentioned in the unit war diary).

The unit is actually considered by the SAS to be part of their regimental family and was included in the SAS Roll of Honour which was dedicated in London last year.
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#2 wtid45

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 01:38 PM

Found a couple of links of intrest Raiding Support Regiment, by Captain Harry Boddington, CD Hal C F Astell - Biography and Family History - Norman F Astell and the Raiding Support Regiment RAIDING SUPPORT REGIMENT in Greece 1944-45
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#3 KevinBattle

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 03:23 PM

2 SS Brigade

???
Our side or theirs???
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#4 von Poop

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 03:30 PM

:D, very droll...

Just pottered onto another thread on these 'SS' Brigades:
1st Special Service Brigade (Commando's) - ww2talk
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#5 Jedburgh22

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 08:41 AM

It seems that the RSR were considered part of SOE's F133 as their medal cards appear in the SOE HS12 Card Index - this is an 'orphan' cardex where medal cards were stored for people without SOE P/Fs
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#6 Smudger Jnr

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 08:46 AM

Very interesting information.

Regards
Tom

Edited by Smudger Jnr, 05 June 2011 - 09:00 AM.

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#7 gollmarc

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 03:41 PM

Would HS12 include citations/recommendations or would it just confirm that a medal was awarded?

Thanks,
Marco
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#8 dbf

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 03:55 PM

Marco are you looking for information about a particular individual and their award?
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#9 gollmarc

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 03:59 PM

Hi dbf

Yes I am trying to put together a list of the South Africans (and Rhodesians) involved in the unit, as well as their citations. Unfortunately most of them don't seem to be available on the National Archives website.

For example - Jack Gage's MC.

Thanks,
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#10 Jedburgh22

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 04:52 PM

Hi Marc - the files in WO contain some citations the Card Index just describes the award recommended and by whom and the effective date in some cases. It also contains details of POWs some South African who worked with SOE - the supporting letter refered to on the cards is not available - I have now finished formatting the cards and am 'tweaking' and Excel spreadsheet that I have put the data onto. There will be a CD available soon with the cards and the Spreadsheet in about 7-10 days depending on time constraints.

Steven
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#11 gollmarc

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 05:19 PM

Thanks Steven, thats sounds very interesting.

So as far as recommendations/citations go, if it doesn't show up on the NA online search, then it isn't available? There's no where else it might be hiding?

Thanks,
Marco
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#12 wtid45

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 05:25 PM

Couple of links that might be of intrest, Jack Gage - RSR - Special Forces - Roll Of Honour RSR - Awards - Special Forces - Roll Of Honour
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#13 Jedburgh22

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Posted 12 June 2011 - 07:19 AM

Marc the citations are a bit hit and miss in some cases they are in the WO, Air or HS files or in other cases it is just a name on a list of awards.
The SOE card index has no citations so it is necessary to cross check with other files. Where a member of SOE has a personal file the citation may be there sometimes.

With RSR it is a case of knowing who is on the unit's nominal roll as people are listed by parent regiment i.e. RA, UDF, etc
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#14 gollmarc

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Posted 12 June 2011 - 06:58 PM

Ah, thanks Steven
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#15 anonemouse

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 04:54 PM

Hi Marc - the files in WO contain some citations the Card Index just describes the award recommended and by whom and the effective date in some cases. It also contains details of POWs some South African who worked with SOE - the supporting letter refered to on the cards is not available - I have now finished formatting the cards and am 'tweaking' and Excel spreadsheet that I have put the data onto. There will be a CD available soon with the cards and the Spreadsheet in about 7-10 days depending on time constraints.

Steven


Hi Steve,
How does one go about getting a copy of the CD?

I'm new to these forums so please bear with me if I ask what appears to be the obvious. I'm also looking for any information, or pointers in the right direction, on the formation of RSR; as in total strength, actual numbers and original units of those who were in RSR ? If any one can help.
I have some ideas but am looking for corroboration.

Special interest in which Gunners served & where. I understand there were 25pdrs and howitzers, but not sure if all & only 25pdrs were on Vis/Croatia/Albania/Montenegro & only all howitzers were in Greece.

Know of towns 'visited' in Yugoslavia, but not of any specific actions.

Have a feeling all 25's were from one regiment comprising 24 guns which at that time could have been split into 3 batteries of 8 guns each & at least 1 of those batteries could have been part of Raiding Force in N Africa?

Was 'Raiding Force' actually separate and permenant outfit, of 'part' regiments temporarily seconded but as permanent support to Special Forces hit & run skirmishes, as opposed to a collective name for any regiment who gave supplies etc to any passing LRDG, SAS etc on an ad hoc basis?

Any other info as to how RSR was born as RSR, and the make up and split, i.e. were they all stationed on Vis or was that just a part that came under Force 133 as opposed to Force 266.

I believe as at April 1944 there were some 1000 Brits + 2000 or so Partisans on the island when there was a gymkhana, horse riding, and inter regimental football tournament & they even opened their own 'pub' in the July?

Many Thanks in advance for any help.

Edited by anonemouse, 26 June 2011 - 11:34 AM.

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#16 Jedburgh22

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 05:29 PM

I believe the RSR was made up of 5 Squadrons

HQ Squadron
ASquadron - armed with .50 MGs and 20mm Cannon
B Squadron - 3" Mortars
C Squadron Anti Tank Guns
D Squadron 75mm Howitzer

111 Field Battery was equipped with 25pdrs
There was also a AA Battery Attached on the Island of Vis

The unit was parachute and moutain warfare trained - para training was at Kabrit or Ramat David, Mountain Warfare at the Cedars of Lebanon (still in use by the British Army in the 1970s) They were also trained in boat handing and amphibious landings.

I intend to copy the RSR files at Kew in the next few weeks
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#17 anonemouse

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 07:19 PM

I believe the RSR was made up of 5 Squadrons

HQ Squadron
ASquadron - armed with .50 MGs and 20mm Cannon
B Squadron - 3" Mortars
C Squadron Anti Tank Guns
D Squadron 75mm Howitzer

111 Field Battery was equipped with 25pdrs
There was also a AA Battery Attached on the Island of Vis

The unit was parachute and moutain warfare trained - para training was at Kabrit or Ramat David, Mountain Warfare at the Cedars of Lebanon (still in use by the British Army in the 1970s) They were also trained in boat handing and amphibious landings.

I intend to copy the RSR files at Kew in the next few weeks



Thanks for that, which is similar to information I have,
Although I believe that not all the RSR were parachute trained. Don't know if any of the 111th actually were, they were in Kabrit in Sept 42 and then 1 Battery went to Tripoli in the November. All three Batteries ended up in Tripoli by the end of January '43.
By March '43 they were accompanied at some point I think by Greek Sacred Squadron, and this is why I wondered if they were part of Raiding Support at that time.
I've traced their route up E Coast of Italy upto Xmas '43, and then they went down to Bari in Spring & from there across to Vis. Not sure whether all 3 batteries were together all the time, or at all.

Guess they would have been part of C Squadron 'cos the 111th had the anti tank gun, but did anyone else? and the boat training fits in because 111th were alongside Commandos & Navy in a few escapades along the Dalmation Coast in '44.
But other details of what action they saw in Croatia, Albania and Montenegro towards the end of '44 is a bit sketchy, all I have is a route and that they appear to have got out before the Partisans became less friendly toward us in the New Year.

I'm also looking for any corroboration as to what happend to David Stirling's Pilot V8 'Blitz Buggy' after he was captured in January '43. Some say that it was shot up & burnt out by Italian aircraft, but I believe it may have been salvaged and have it on authority that the car was actually used in Italy, but hard to find corroboration or other pictures? Any help, or pointers, is appreciated.
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#18 Owen

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 09:25 PM

We had this email in the Admin email account.
should be a useful book for those with an interest in this subject.

This might be of interest to your members: Walter Jones’s service and the operations of the Raiding Support Regiment have just been published by the University of Plymouth: Raiding Support Regiment (Paperback) | Plymouth University
Many Thanks


http://estore.plymouth.ac.uk/includes/ImageServerup.asp?images=D4F6-B12F-B9C1-BCBB-1824.JPG
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#19 walter jones

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 09:02 PM

My Grandfather was Walter Jones. He served in the RSR - Raiding Support Regiment during World War 2. Before he died he finished a book from the diaries that he meticulously wrote in every day during the war. Serving across many countries in the RSR, historians at the University of Plymouth kindly decided to publish his book. This book is just a small part of his writings and focusses only on the RSR in Yugoslavia, mainly on the island of Viz, as this has been a subject that has previously had very little written on it. If anyone would like to know more or find out more about the Raiding support regiment please get in touch.
Thanks, Matt Stewart 07971069976 / matt.stewart1977@hotmail.co.uk


I don't think many people know about his book or even know it exists. Be great if people get the opportunity to read this very accurate account.
http://www.amazon.co...60701877&sr=1-1

The Second World War in Yugoslavia is an area neglected by historians and other commentators. This is perhaps surprising as Yugoslavia was the only country in Europe to be conquered by the Germans and then, later, to free itself solely as a result of guerilla activity. Other countries had to be liberated by Allied armies. The British played an important role in supporting the activities of Tito s guerilla army. This is the story of Walter Jones s service and the operations of the Raiding Support Regiment. A precursor to the modern SAS the Raiding Support Regiment fought alongside the commandos and Tito s partisan in Yugoslavia. Based on the Island of Vis in the Adriatic they provided heavy weapons support to British and partisan forces trying to drive the Germans out of Yugoslavia. Later they served in Albania and Italy. This is a brutally honest account of one man s service with the Regiment and a neglected period of European history. It documents the transformation of a young man into a combat veteran as he witnesses the effects of bombing, the deliberate killing of POWs and partisan savagery against those who transgress the partisan code
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#20 walter jones

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 09:03 PM

My Grandfather was Walter Jones. He served in the RSR - Raiding Support Regiment during World War 2. Before he died he finished a book from the diaries that he meticulously wrote in every day during the war. Serving across many countries in the RSR, historians at the University of Plymouth kindly decided to publish his book. This book is just a small part of his writings and focusses only on the RSR in Yugoslavia, mainly on the island of Viz, as this has been a subject that has previously had very little written on it. If anyone would like to know more or find out more about the Raiding support regiment please get in touch.
Thanks, Matt Stewart 07971069976 / matt.stewart1977@hotmail.co.uk


I don't think many people know about his book or even know it exists. Be great if people get the opportunity to read this very accurate account.
http://www.amazon.co...60701877&sr=1-1

The Second World War in Yugoslavia is an area neglected by historians and other commentators. This is perhaps surprising as Yugoslavia was the only country in Europe to be conquered by the Germans and then, later, to free itself solely as a result of guerilla activity. Other countries had to be liberated by Allied armies. The British played an important role in supporting the activities of Tito s guerilla army. This is the story of Walter Jones s service and the operations of the Raiding Support Regiment. A precursor to the modern SAS the Raiding Support Regiment fought alongside the commandos and Tito s partisan in Yugoslavia. Based on the Island of Vis in the Adriatic they provided heavy weapons support to British and partisan forces trying to drive the Germans out of Yugoslavia. Later they served in Albania and Italy. This is a brutally honest account of one man s service with the Regiment and a neglected period of European history. It documents the transformation of a young man into a combat veteran as he witnesses the effects of bombing, the deliberate killing of POWs and partisan savagery against those who transgress the partisan code
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#21 walter jones

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 09:06 PM

I believe the RSR was made up of 5 Squadrons

HQ Squadron
ASquadron - armed with .50 MGs and 20mm Cannon
B Squadron - 3" Mortars
C Squadron Anti Tank Guns
D Squadron 75mm Howitzer

111 Field Battery was equipped with 25pdrs
There was also a AA Battery Attached on the Island of Vis

The unit was parachute and moutain warfare trained - para training was at Kabrit or Ramat David, Mountain Warfare at the Cedars of Lebanon (still in use by the British Army in the 1970s) They were also trained in boat handing and amphibious landings.

I intend to copy the RSR files at Kew in the next few weeks


Thanks for that, which is similar to information I have,
Although I believe that not all the RSR were parachute trained. Don't know if any of the 111th actually were, they were in Kabrit in Sept 42 and then 1 Battery went to Tripoli in the November. All three Batteries ended up in Tripoli by the end of January '43.
By March '43 they were accompanied at some point I think by Greek Sacred Squadron, and this is why I wondered if they were part of Raiding Support at that time.
I've traced their route up E Coast of Italy upto Xmas '43, and then they went down to Bari in Spring & from there across to Vis. Not sure whether all 3 batteries were together all the time, or at all.

Guess they would have been part of C Squadron 'cos the 111th had the anti tank gun, but did anyone else? and the boat training fits in because 111th were alongside Commandos & Navy in a few escapades along the Dalmation Coast in '44.
But other details of what action they saw in Croatia, Albania and Montenegro towards the end of '44 is a bit sketchy, all I have is a route and that they appear to have got out before the Partisans became less friendly toward us in the New Year.

I'm also looking for any corroboration as to what happend to David Stirling's Pilot V8 'Blitz Buggy' after he was captured in January '43. Some say that it was shot up & burnt out by Italian aircraft, but I believe it may have been salvaged and have it on authority that the car was actually used in Italy, but hard to find corroboration or other pictures? Any help, or pointers, is appreciated.


My Grandfather was Walter Jones. He served in the RSR - Raiding Support Regiment during World War 2. Before he died he finished a book from the diaries that he meticulously wrote in every day during the war. Serving across many countries in the RSR, historians at the University of Plymouth kindly decided to publish his book. This book is just a small part of his writings and focusses only on the RSR in Yugoslavia, mainly on the island of Viz, as this has been a subject that has previously had very little written on it. If anyone would like to know more or find out more about the Raiding support regiment please get in touch.
Thanks, Matt Stewart 07971069976 / matt.stewart1977@hotmail.co.uk


I don't think many people know about his book or even know it exists. Be great if people get the opportunity to read this very accurate account.
http://www.amazon.co....0701877&sr=1-1

The Second World War in Yugoslavia is an area neglected by historians and other commentators. This is perhaps surprising as Yugoslavia was the only country in Europe to be conquered by the Germans and then, later, to free itself solely as a result of guerilla activity. Other countries had to be liberated by Allied armies. The British played an important role in supporting the activities of Tito s guerilla army. This is the story of Walter Jones s service and the operations of the Raiding Support Regiment. A precursor to the modern SAS the Raiding Support Regiment fought alongside the commandos and Tito s partisan in Yugoslavia. Based on the Island of Vis in the Adriatic they provided heavy weapons support to British and partisan forces trying to drive the Germans out of Yugoslavia. Later they served in Albania and Italy. This is a brutally honest account of one man s service with the Regiment and a neglected period of European history. It documents the transformation of a young man into a combat veteran as he witnesses the effects of bombing, the deliberate killing of POWs and partisan savagery against those who transgress the partisan code
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#22 walter jones

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 10:19 PM

Having just read a posting about the Raiding Support Regiment I would like to give an accurate,but brief description.I should point out that my late grandfather served in the unit and I have spent 8 years or so researching them.

The unit was formed in 1943 by Raidng Forces (Middle East/CO Brig' DJT Turnbull) and was never part of 2 SS Brigade.In fact they wore the beige beret and SAS wings and not the green beret like those of 2 SS Brigade.When operating in the Adriatic they carried out joint ops with the commandos in support of the Partisans,but were never part of the same brigade as them.Until June of 1944 they came under command of Force 266 when operating in the Adriatic and after that they and 2 SS Brigade came under the theatre command of Land Forces Adriatic.The elements of the RSR that served in the mountains of Greece giving close support to the partisans and also operating on their own came under command of Force 133.

It is worth noting that the RSR was formed primarily to give support to the SAS Special Boat Squadron,SAS Greek Sacred Squadron(both part of Raiding Forces,Middle East),Balkan Guerrillas and to operate on it's own carrying out ambushes,demolitions etc.The unit was not formed to support the Commandos it was simply that both formations were deployed in the Adriatic and so operated together.There was to be fair a few ops where RSR sub-units came under temporary command of the Commandos.The unit often operated as the close fire support group to the partisans and in fact a few members of the RSR undertook basic Yugoslav language courses(this is mentioned in the unit war diary).

The unit is actually considered by the SAS to be part of their regimental family and was included in the SAS Roll of Honour which was dedicated in London last year.


I know it is sometime since you posted this, but this might be of interest.

My Grandfather was Walter Jones. He served in the RSR - Raiding Support Regiment during World War 2. Before he died he finished a book from the diaries that he meticulously wrote in every day during the war. Serving across many countries in the RSR, historians at the University of Plymouth kindly decided to publish his book. This book is just a small part of his writings and focusses only on the RSR in Yugoslavia, mainly on the island of Viz, as this has been a subject that has previously had very little written on it. If I can help with anything please get in touch
Thanks, Matt Stewart 07971069976 / matt.stewart1977@hotmail.co.uk


I don't think many people know about his book or even know it exists. Be great if people get the opportunity to read this very accurate account.
http://www.amazon.co....0701877&sr=1-1

The Second World War in Yugoslavia is an area neglected by historians and other commentators. This is perhaps surprising as Yugoslavia was the only country in Europe to be conquered by the Germans and then, later, to free itself solely as a result of guerilla activity. Other countries had to be liberated by Allied armies. The British played an important role in supporting the activities of Tito s guerilla army. This is the story of Walter Jones s service and the operations of the Raiding Support Regiment. A precursor to the modern SAS the Raiding Support Regiment fought alongside the commandos and Tito s partisan in Yugoslavia. Based on the Island of Vis in the Adriatic they provided heavy weapons support to British and partisan forces trying to drive the Germans out of Yugoslavia. Later they served in Albania and Italy. This is a brutally honest account of one man s service with the Regiment and a neglected period of European history. It documents the transformation of a young man into a combat veteran as he witnesses the effects of bombing, the deliberate killing of POWs and partisan savagery against those who transgress the partisan code
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#23 saint jack

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 04:53 AM

Hello to all, Iv'e just become a member the main reason being my interest in the RSR. A father of a good fiend served in the RSR, He's in his nineties and doing ok for his age. He is a sharp as a knife, his memory is excellent. David Sydney Davies born just outside Aberystwth in mid wales firstly joined the Leicester Yeomanry then volunteered for the RSR. He spent his 21st birthday at the battle of El Alamein. He got about quite a bit with the RSR he was with D squadron C Troop Q Battery. He was based on Viz for a while.Syd Has some good photos of the RSR, as i said his memory is excellent. After ww2 Syd emigrated to Perth, Western Australia with his wife. so if Syd can be of any help re RSR questions etc. please do not hesitate to contact me he would be pleased to help.
regards........Saint Jack.
earlgrey@iinet.net.au
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#24 Drew5233

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 10:17 AM

Hi and welcome - any chance you can post the photo's?
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#25 saint jack

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 12:25 PM

I am seeing him next week and see what i can do, his wife keeps telling him to write some info on the back of them because he's the only one who knows when,where & what they are. what's the best way of getting them from photos to posting online?
Regards.....Saint Jack.
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