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Mills etc, bombs and accidents


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#1 geoff501

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:42 PM

One of the most unusual VCs was awarded to Billy McFadzean. In Richard Holmes' Tommy he states that as late as mid 1916 there was one accident every 3,000 grenades.
I've been using the WW1 search engine to find similar incidents and will post here.
The other well known similar incident where a VC was awarded was Corporal Jarratt.

Name: McFADZEAN, WILLIAM FREDERICK
Initials: W F
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Rifleman
Regiment/Service: Royal Irish Rifles
Unit Text: "C" Coy. 14th Bn.
Age: 20
Date of Death: 01/07/1916
Service No: 18278
Awards: V C
Additional information: Son of William and Annie Pedlow McFadzean, of Rubicon, Cregagh, Belfast.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Pier and Face 15 A and 15 B.
Memorial: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL
Citation: An extract from the London Gazette, dated 8th Sept., 1916, records the following:-"For most conspicuous bravery. While in a concentration trench and opening a box of bombs for distribution prior to an attack, the box slipped down into the trench, which was crowded with men, and two of the safety pins fell out. Private McFadzean, instantly realising the danger to his comrades, with heroic courage threw himself on the top of the bombs. The bombs exploded blowing him to pieces, but only one other man was injured. He well knew his danger, being himself a bomber, but without a moment's hesitation he gave his life for his comrades."
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#2 geoff501

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:44 PM

Name: JARRATT, GEORGE
Initials: G
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Corporal
Regiment/Service: Royal Fusiliers
Unit Text: 8th Bn.
Age: 25
Date of Death: 03/05/1917
Service No: 55295
Awards: V C
Additional information: Husband of G. M. Jarratt, of 28, Stanley Road, Southgate, Middx.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Bay 3.
Memorial: ARRAS MEMORIAL
Citation: An extract from "The London Gazette" dated 8th June, 1917, records the following:-"For most conspicuous bravery and devotion in deliberately sacrificing his life to save others. He had, together with some wounded men, been taken prisoner and placed under guard in a dug-out. The same evening the enemy were driven back by our troops, the leading infantrymen of which commenced to bomb the dug-outs. A grenade fell in the dugout, and without hesitation Cpl. Jarratt placed both feet on the grenade, the subsequent explosion blowing off both his legs. The wounded were later safely removed to our lines, but Cpl. Jarratt died before he could be removed. By this supreme act of self-sacrifice the lives of these wounded were saved."
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#3 geoff501

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:50 PM

Lance Corporal George Alderson was awarded The Albert Medal

Name: ALDERSON
Initials: G
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment/Service: Durham Light Infantry
Unit Text: 10th Bn.
Age: 31
Date of Death: 15/10/1915
Service No: 12231
Awards: A M
Additional information: Husband of Ethel Alderson, of 10, Stephenson St., Dunston-on-Tyne, Co. Durham.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: I. B. 14A.
Cemetery: LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY
Citation: An extract from the London Gazette dated the 19th May 1916, records the following : "On the evening of the 14th October, 1915, Alderson, with two other non-commissioned Officers, was moving some bombs into a room in a farmhouse where they were to be stored. While the bombs were being stacked, one of them fell to the floor and the percussion cap was fired. Alderson, knowing that the bomb would explode in four seconds, and that to throw it out of the window would endanger the men who were outside, picked it up and tried to reach the door. Before he could get out of the door the bomb exploded, blowing off his hand and inflicting other serious wounds, from which he shortly died. By his prompt action in picking up and carrying the bomb he probably saved the lives of the three men who were in the room with him, and by his presence of mind in not throwing it out of the window he certainly saved the lives of those standing outside. This act was the more meritorious as Alderson was fully aware of the deadly nature of the bomb and the danger to himself that his act involved."
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#4 Owen

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:51 PM

WW2 but similar action for John Rennie who was awarded the GC.
http://www.ww2talk.c...621-post96.html

On 29th October 1943 Sergeant Rennie was overseeing training in grenade throwing at a Canadian camp in Slough, Buckinghamshire. Preparations for D-Day were well under way and men were training for the liberation of Europe.

Rennie noticed one of the hand grenades had not carried clear of the trench and he could see it was rolling back towards the Canadian soldiers.

Rennie ran towards the grenade to intercept it as quickly as possible so he could throw it clear. Sadly as he reached the grenade the fuse time had expired and the grenade exploded in his possession. The grenade killed Rennie but by his actions he had saved the three Canadian soldiers standing less than six paces from the explosion.



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#5 geoff501

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:52 PM

Name: ANDERSON, CHARLES HENRY
Initials: C H
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lance Serjeant
Regiment/Service: London Regiment (London Scottish)
Unit Text: 1st/14th Bn.
Age: 26
Date of Death: 29/11/1916
Service No: 2326
Awards: A M
Additional information: Son of Charles and Lizzie Anderson, of The Nest, North Stoke, Oxon.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: II. K. 3.
Cemetery: ST. VENANT COMMUNAL CEMETERY
Citation: An extract from "The London Gazette," No. 30156, dated 29th June, 1917, records the following:-"The King has been graciously pleased to award the Decoration of the Albert Medal of the First Class in recognition of the gallantry of Lce. Cpl. Charles Henry Anderson, late of the 1st/14th Bn. of the London Regt., who lost his life in France in November last in saving the lives of others. On the 28th Nov., 1916, Lce. Cpl. Anderson was in a hut in France with eleven other men when, accidentally, the safety pin was withdrawn from a bomb. In the semi-darkness he shouted a warning to the men, rushed to the door, and endeavoured to open it so as to throw the bomb into a field. Failing to do this, when he judged that the five seconds during which the fuse was timed to burn had elapsed, he held the bomb as close to his body as possible with both hands in order to screen the other men in the hut. Anderson himself and one other man were mortally wounded by the explosion, and five men were injured. The remaining five escaped unhurt. Anderson sacrificed his life to save his comrades."
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#6 geoff501

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:53 PM

WW2 but similar action for John Rennie who was awarded the GC.


Cheers. Know of any more?
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#7 Drew5233

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:54 PM

Geoff-If you look on my George Cross thread I think there was at least another two GC's awarded in WW2 for hand grenade related accidents. One was a Para in Africa when they were preparing for Sicily and the other was an Indian/Gurkha soldier I think in the Far East.
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#8 geoff501

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:56 PM

All details from CWGC

Name: HALSTEAD, ARTHUR
Initials: A
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)
Unit Text: 10th Bn.
Age: 23
Date of Death: 01/08/1917
Awards: M C, A M
Additional information: Son of Elijah and Sarah Ann Halstead, of 8, Buxton St., Lee Mount, Halifax.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: IV. C. 83.
Cemetery: LONGUENESSE (ST. OMER) SOUVENIR CEMETERY
Citation: An extract from "The London Gazette," No. 30453, dated 1st Jan., 1918, records the following:-"On the 31st July, 1917, during instruction in the throwing of live bombs, a bomb was accidentally dropped. Lieutenant Halstead placed himself between the bomb and the soldier who had dropped it, in order to screen him, and tried to kick the bomb away, but it exploded, fatally wounding him. The soldier was slightly wounded, and there can be little doubt that Lieutenant Halstead's gallant action saved the soldier's life." Albert Medal in Gold.
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#9 geoff501

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:59 PM

One who survived, to be killed later. Ammonal was susceptible to damp.

Name: McCREATH, ANDREW BERGHANS
Initials: A B
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment/Service: Northumberland Fusiliers
Unit Text: 2nd/7th Bn.
Secondary Regiment: King's Own Scottish Borderers
Secondary Unit Text: attd. 5th Bn.
Age: 29
Date of Death: 11/12/1917
Awards: A M
Additional information: Son of Henry Gourlay McCreath and Agnes Isabella McCreath, of 1, Wellington Terrace, Berwick-on-Tweed. Born at Norham-on-Tweed.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: O. 62.
Cemetery: CAIRO WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY
Citation: An extract from The London Gazette dated 1st Jan., 1918., records the following:- "On 26th July, 1917, during an inspection of grenades, one of the grenades fell on the ground and detonated, and Lieutenant McCreath, hearing warning shouts, ran up and picked up the bomb. In order to get rid of it without endangering others, he had to run until he found an empty dug-out into which to throw it. As he was about to throw it away the detonator exploded; fortunately, the ammonal was wet (although Lieutenant McCreath did not know this), and no further explosion took place or he would almost certainly have been killed or severely injured."
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#10 geoff501

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 10:01 PM

Name: PLACE
Initials: A
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Petty Officer
Regiment/Service: Royal Navy
Unit Text: 2nd Drake Bn. R.N. Div.
Date of Death: 16/06/1916
Service No: J3080
Awards: A M
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: "U." 2967.
Cemetery: LEEDS (HUNSLET OLD) CEMETERY
Citation: An extract from the London Gazette dated the 1st January 1918, records the following : "The King has been graciously pleased to award the Decoration of the Albert Medal in recognition of the gallantry of Petty Officer Alfred Place, late of the Royal Navy." The circumstances are as follows : "At Blandford, on the 16th June, 1916, during grenade practice, a live bomb thrown by one of the men under instruction fell back into the trench. Petty Officer Place rushed forward, pulled back two men who were in front of him and attempted to reach the grenade with the intention of throwing it over the parapet. Unfortunately, the bomb exploded before he could reach it and inflicted fatal injuries. By his coolness and self-sacrifice Petty Officer Place probably saved the lives of three other men."
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#11 geoff501

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 10:03 PM

Name: THORNER
Initials: H
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment/Service: Machine Gun Corps
Unit Text: 90th Coy
Date of Death: 30/12/1917
Awards: A M
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: XV. A. 12.
Cemetery: THE HUTS CEMETERY
Citation: Lt. Thorner was examining some Mills hand grenades in a small concrete dug-out in France prior to taking them up to his machine-gun position during an expected enemy raid. One of the grenades began to fizz when taken out of the box. There were twleve men in the dug-out at the moment and there was no possible means of disposing of the bomb. Realizing what had happened Lt. Thorner shouted to his men to clear out whilst he himself held the bomb in his hand close to his body until it exploded and killed him. By this magnificent act of courage Lt. Thorner deliberately sacrificed his own life for others. Of the twelve men who were in the dug-out all but two escaped without injury - they were slightly wounded.
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#12 geoff501

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 10:05 PM

Geoff-If you look on my George Cross thread I think there was at least another two GC's awarded in WW2 for hand grenade related accidents. One was a Para in Africa when they were preparing for Sicily and the other was an Indian/Gurkha soldier I think in the Far East.

Thanks.
I guess the GC replaced the AM at some point?
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#13 Drew5233

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 10:14 PM

Yes Geoff. The GC replaced three medals - Albert Medal, Edward Medal and Empire Gallantry Medal around the end of 1940. The King wanted an award that could be given to civilians to recognise their bravery during the Blitz. I can't remember the exact circumstances but people awarded the AM, EM, EGM could exchange them for GC's if they fitted the criteria. I think it was date related.
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#14 geoff501

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 10:17 PM

Cheers Andy.

All these were found by searching the recently added 'Citation' field in the WW1 search engine. Any interest in adding this field to the WW2 engine?
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#15 Drew5233

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 10:25 PM

I think it could be a good addition mate. One thing I did discover a few years ago though, CWGC do not list the full citation on their website. I think it was discussed before when I was doing the VC thread and noticed the citations on CWGC were only partial.
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#16 klambie

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 11:00 PM

British Empire Medal, Military Division

H6817 Serjeant George John Gardiner, 1st Bn Regina Rifles

On the 21 February 1944 this non-commissioned officer was in charge of a squad carrying out grenade training in a chalk pit. The men were engaged in cleaning and priming grenades to be thrown later. Several grenades had been primed, ready for throwing when one man mistakenly pulled the pin on one of them. Upon realizing what he had done he dropped the grenade and gave the alarm. Sergeant Gardiner, seeing the grenade smoking and realizing an explosion was imminent, with great presence of mind and complete disregard for his own safety, rushed forward, picked up the grenade and managed to throw it clear of the pit where it immediately burst in the air. It is considered that this non-commissioned officer by his prompt and courageous action prevented detonation of the other grenades in the pit and fatalities or serious injuries among the members of his party.

Initially turned down by the Awards Committee (Overseas) who thought the act would be more properly recognized by a Commendation for Gallantry.

Maj-General HFG Letson did not concur, feeling the act was well within the terms of reference for the BEM and the matter was submitted to the Awards Coordination Committee for consideration.

The Awards Coordination Committee concurred and the recommendation was submitted, recommended for approval by Letson.


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#17 Tom Canning

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 11:18 PM

Geoff

Major A.G. Kempster of "A" sqdn 145th RAC was awarded the GC for dropping onto a live grenade during a training exercise at Herbillon in North Africa on 21st Aug 1943
thus saving the lives of others in the trench
Cheers
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#18 geoff501

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 11:25 PM

Geoff
Major A.G. Kempster of "A" sqdn 145th RAC was awarded the GC for dropping onto a live grenade during a training exercise at Herbillon in North Africa on 21st Aug 1943
thus saving the lives of others in the trench
Cheers



Thanks!

Name: KEMPSTER, ANDRE GILBERT
Initials: A G
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Major
Regiment/Service: Royal Armoured Corps
Unit Text: 145th (8th Bn. The Duke of Wellington's Regt.; West Riding) Regt.
Date of Death: 21/08/1943
Service No: 138804
Awards: G C
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: II. D. 1.
Cemetery: BONE WAR CEMETERY, ANNABA
Citation: The London Gazette of 9th November, 1943, states that this officer was awarded the George Cross "in recognition of most conspicuous gallantry in carrying out hazardous work in a very brave manner." Major Kempster threw himself upon a live grenade to save the lives of recruits on the practice range at Phillipeville, Algeria.
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#19 markinbelfast

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 07:41 PM

CWGC :: Casualty Details
this man died as a result of an accident with an anti-tank bomb.
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#20 geoff501

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 09:55 PM

Name: DUNCAN, CHARLES ALFRED
Initials: C A
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Private
Regiment/Service: The Parachute Regiment, A.A.C.
Unit Text: 4th Bn.
Age: 23
Date of Death: 10/07/1943
Service No: 6287023
Awards: G C
Additional information: Son of Sidney John and Elizabeth Duncan, of Sidley, Bexhill-on-Sea, Sussex.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: III. B. 28.
Cemetery: ENFIDAVILLE WAR CEMETERY
Citation: The London Gazette of 9th November, 1943, states that the award of the George Cross was made "in recognition of most conspicuous gallantry in carrying out hazardous work in a very brave manner." Pte. Duncan was serving at M'Saken in North Africa when a live grenade fell amongst a group of his comrades. Realising that it was on the point of exploding he threw himself upon it and gave his life to save theirs.
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#21 geoff501

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 09:57 PM

Name: SILK, JOSEPH HENRY
Initials: J H
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Private
Regiment/Service: Somerset Light Infantry
Unit Text: 1st Bn.
Age: 27
Date of Death: 04/12/1943
Service No: 5625234
Awards: G C
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: 10. K. 22.
Cemetery: TAUKKYAN WAR CEMETERY
Citation: The following details are given in the London Gazette of June 13th, 1944:- Awarded the George Cross for most conspicuous gallantry in carrying out hazardous work in a very brave manner. Pte. Silk threw himself upon a live grenade to save the lives of the recruits under training in Burma (now Myanmar).
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#22 geoff501

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 10:01 PM

Name: ISLAM-UD-DIN
Nationality: Indian
Rank: Lance Naik
Regiment/Service: 9th Jat Regiment
Unit Text: 6th Bn.
Age: 19
Date of Death: 12/04/1945
Service No: 27103
Awards: G C
Additional information: Son of Muhammad Abbas and Majidan; husband of Akhtari Begum, of Chak No. 90/EB, Montgomery, Pakistan.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Face 38.
Memorial: RANGOON MEMORIAL
Citation: The citation in the London Gazette for 5th October, 1945, states that this N.C.O. was awarded the George Cross "for most conspicuous gallantry in carrying out hazardous work in a very brave manner" Lance Naik Islam-Ud-Din, at Pyawbwe in Burma (now Myanmar) threw himself upon a live hand-grenade to save the lives of his comrades. He was an exemplary soldier and had displayed high qualities of leadership and courage in previous action on 24th March 1945 near Khanda, North of Meiktila.
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#23 geoff501

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 10:03 PM

Name: SUBRAMANIAN
Nationality: Indian
Rank: Subadar
Regiment/Service: Queen Victoria's Own Madras Sappers and Miners
Age: 30
Date of Death: 24/02/1944
Service No: 14069
Awards: G C, I D S M
Additional information: Son of Kannayiram and Thangammal; husband of Shanbagammal, of Keelvodivakkam, Walajabad, Chengalpet, India.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Column I.
Cemetery: SANGRO RIVER CREMATION MEMORIAL
Citation: The citation in the London Gazette for 30th June, 1944, reads: "Awarded the George Cross for most conspicuous gallantry in carrying out hazardous work in a very brave manner." Subadar Subramanian was killed when he threw himself upon an unexploded mine to save his comrades.
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"Well, the most important thing that was new was the idea of URI -- or URL. The idea that any piece of information anywhere should have an identifier, which will not only identify it, but allow you to get hold of it. That idea was the basic clue to the universality of the Web. That was the only thing I insisted upon." Tim Berners-Lee.





#24 geoff501

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 10:06 PM

Name: OSBORN, JOHN ROBERT
Initials: J R
Nationality: Canadian
Rank: Warrant Officer Class II (C.S.M.)
Regiment/Service: Winnipeg Grenadiers, R.C.I.C.
Age: 42
Date of Death: 19/12/1941
Service No: H/6008
Awards: V C
Additional information: Son of John Robert and Harriet Sussana Osborn; husband of Margaret Elizabeth Osborn, of St. Vital, Manitoba, Canada.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Column 25.
Memorial: SAI WAN MEMORIAL
Citation: The citation in the London Gazette of 1st April, 1946, gives the following particulars : At Hong Kong, on 19th December, 1941, a company of the Winnipeg Grenadiers became divided in an attack on Mount Butler. A part of the company led by C.S.M. Osborn captured the hill at bayonet point, but after three hours owing to the superior numbers of the enemy the position became untenable. C.S.M. Osborn and a small group covered the withdrawal and when their turn came to fall back he single-handed engaged the enemy, exposing himself to heavy enemy fire to cover their retirement. Later the Company was cut off and completely surrounded. Several enemy grenades were thrown which C.S.M. Osborn picked up and threw back. When one landed in a position where it was impossible to pick it up, he threw himself upon it and was instantly killed. His self-sacrifice undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his comrades. C.S.M. Osborn was an inspiring example to all throughout the defence, and in his death he displayed the highest qualities of heroism and self-sacrifice.
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The WW2 Commonwealth Casualty Search Engine:
http://www.hut-six.c.../search39-47.php

"Well, the most important thing that was new was the idea of URI -- or URL. The idea that any piece of information anywhere should have an identifier, which will not only identify it, but allow you to get hold of it. That idea was the basic clue to the universality of the Web. That was the only thing I insisted upon." Tim Berners-Lee.





#25 Deacs

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 10:27 PM

Hello Geoff i don't no if you have read The War Illustrated 1917 but in volume 7 there is a story in it that is of sort of what you are posting but it seems he surrvived.

"A sergeant John Carmichael , V.C.,North Staffordshire Regiment,While excavating a trench he saw an unearthed grenade starting to burn. To have thrown it out would have endangered men working on the top, so yelling a warning, he placed his helmet on the grenade and stood on the helmet. Though badly injured by the explosion, he saved many a life."

I whish i could scan and post the picture but unfortunately my scanner doesn't work sorry.

Just bought a new scanner so here is the picture.

Regards Michael.

Attached Files


Edited by Deacs, 28 January 2012 - 10:08 PM.
Added 1917 for ww1 War Illustrated sorry

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:poppy: SAPPER ALBERT DEACON 3605477. 80 Assault Squadron Royal Engineers- 14/9/1919.-29/12/2009 :poppy:.

:poppy: DRIVER ROBERT WILLIAM JOHNSTON T/168241.R.A.S.C- 1/8/1917.-9/12/1989 :poppy:.

#26 Cee

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 11:11 PM

Deacs,

The complete record of The War Illustrated is now online:

The War Illustrated Archive

Oops, that's only for WW2 - sorry!

Edited by Cee, 22 January 2012 - 12:47 AM.
goof-up

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#27 Deacs

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 09:35 PM

Deacs,

The complete record of The War Illustrated is now online:

The War Illustrated Archive

Oops, that's only for WW2 - sorry!


Cee you didn't goof i did i should have put WW1 into my post in the first place.

Regards Michael.
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:poppy: SAPPER ALBERT DEACON 3605477. 80 Assault Squadron Royal Engineers- 14/9/1919.-29/12/2009 :poppy:.

:poppy: DRIVER ROBERT WILLIAM JOHNSTON T/168241.R.A.S.C- 1/8/1917.-9/12/1989 :poppy:.

#28 CL1

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 01:01 PM

Hello Michael


WW1 War Illustrated


Link on here already re WW2 http://www.ww2talk.c...ustrated-6.html

regards
Clive
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#29 geoff501

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 08:45 PM

HEALY, M
Rank: Serjeant
Service No: 5130
Date of Death: 02/03/1917
Age: 25
Regiment/Service: Royal Munster Fusiliers 2nd Bn.
Awards: A M, D C M, M M and Bar
Grave Reference II. B. 53.
Cemetery BRAY MILITARY CEMETERY

Son of Mrs. Annie Healy, of Ballinamuck, Dungarvan, Co. Waterford. A War Office letter (68/Albert/109/A.G.10) records the following:-"On 1st March, 1917, this non-commissioned officer, with a total disregard for his own personal safety and solely prompted by the desire to save his comrades, rushed to pick up a live bomb which had been thrown by a Private and which struck the parapet and rolled back into the trench near Lieutenant Roe and the Private. Sergeant Healy, fearing the party could not escape in time, made a most gallant attempt to seize and hurl the bomb from the trench. It exploded, however, and mortally wounded him. This was the last of Sergeant Healy's many acts of gallantry and devotion to duty. He was previously awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal and the Military Medal and later a bar to his Military Medal.".

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The WW2 Commonwealth Casualty Search Engine:
http://www.hut-six.c.../search39-47.php

"Well, the most important thing that was new was the idea of URI -- or URL. The idea that any piece of information anywhere should have an identifier, which will not only identify it, but allow you to get hold of it. That idea was the basic clue to the universality of the Web. That was the only thing I insisted upon." Tim Berners-Lee.








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