Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Hill 195, Normandy.


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,118 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 17 April 2006 - 01:38 PM

Taken from Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders of Canada website.http://www.ashofc.ca/ASHFRAME.htm

We visited this area in October 2005.


HILL 195 is the highest piece of ground on the road from CAEN to FALAISE. In the summer of 1944, the Canadian Army in France was advancing down this road as part of OPERATION TOTALIZE. Naturally, HILL 195 was identified as vital ground and an attack was organized to take it.
HILL 195 - THE ARGYLL ATTACK
By 10 August 1944, the Argylls were in the village of LANGANNERIE just a few kilometres north of HILL 195. The order came down from brigade HQ that the Argylls were to take the hill that night. The Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Dave Stewart, chose an unorthodox plan. Following a well-reconnoitred route, the battalion would set off single file through the dark, slip through German lines and silently occupy the hill before the Germans knew they were there.
The Argylls crossed the start line at 0001 hours (12:01 am) on 11 August 1944 and were on HILL 195 by 0430 hours (4:30 am) following a circuitous route to the east and northeast of the hill. Most of the surprised German garrison of about 50 were taken prisoner without a shot being fired. The hill was taken without a single Canadian casualty. "C" and "D" companies dug in on the forward slope; "A" and "B" companies dug in on the reverse slope.
In the half-hour of darkness before dawn, the Argylls worked madly (assisted by their German prisoners) to consolidate their position. It was soon discovered that one foot down in the soil was an impenetrable layer of chalk. The Argylls were to hold the hill from some very shallow trenches. Vehicles towing 6 pounder and 17 pounder antitank guns made their way through the dark to link up and support the unit before first light.
At first light, the Germans (surrounding HILL 195 on three sides) reacted immediately. Soon heavy mortar fire was falling on the Argylls. A German counter attack on the "A" Company position failed and 27 German prisoners were taken.
The tanks of The 22nd Canadian Armoured Regiment (The Canadian Grenadier Guards) were supposed to pass through the Argylls and exploit the breach in the German lines. The ferocity of the German counter attacks stopped these efforts cold. At noon, the tanks of The 21st Canadian Armoured Regiment (The Governor Generals Foot Guards) were sent forward to assist in the battle and would remain in the fight for the remainder of the day.
In the afternoon, heavy artillery and air support was made available to the Argylls and the Germans suffered many casualties as a result. The last German counter attack was beaten off at 1930 hours (7:30 PM). At 2100 hours (9:00 PM), the Argylls were relieved by The Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders. The Argylls had lost seven killed and 24 wounded holding the hill.
Noted military author and historian Lieutenant Colonel JA English has called the battle at HILL 195 the most impressive single action executed in OPERATION TOTALIZE.

Attached Files


  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#2 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,118 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 17 April 2006 - 01:42 PM

We went here back in October 2005.
It's taken until now to take a digital photo of our album so I can post it here.

I believe a Canadian production company is currently making a film of this action.
Found this on the Web.
In early November 2004 he (Rob Child) was signed by veteran Canadian producer Dick Nielsen
to direct and co-produce Nielsen's forthcoming Canadian theatrical release,
Hill 195. The project, which has the support of the Canadian government,
begins filming in Southern Ontario in 2006. Hill 195 is a multi-million dollar
World War II era action-feature, which showcases the heroic actions of a
single Canadian regiment just weeks after D-Day


I'm in touch with a Veteran of ASH of Can who was there from Normandy until the end.

Attached Files


  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#3 ComradeRomain

ComradeRomain

    Member

  • Registered Users
  • PipPipPip
  • 36 posts

Posted 17 April 2006 - 02:08 PM

wow i didnt know that....maybe ill be able to see the movie soon on CBC?
  • 0

#4 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,118 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 17 April 2006 - 09:52 PM

Map here of how to get to Memorial.
http://www.normandie...potignus2.html#
Soon as the film comes out everyone will have this as a "must see" on their itineries.
  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#5 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,118 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 17 April 2006 - 10:01 PM

Found this interview with my Veteran friend from another website.
here
Northwest Historical Association (NWHA) - WW2 Reenacting Society



"Hill 195 was the first real action that I was involved in. We sneaked up
that hill in the middle of the night [August 10/11, 1944] and were dug in
before the enemy knew we were there. It was quite an exciting occasion. The
ground was so hard that digging in was almost impossible. I remember that
my slit trench was about 10 inches deep despite all efforts to enlarge it.
That was barely enough to protect the crown jewels. And there was plenty
of metal flying around once they realized we were there."

"We watched with awe as the tanks of the Canadian Grenadier Guards tried
to advance, only to be knocked off one by one. Typhoons were very active
trying to knockout the enemy tanks in Quesnay Woods, just off to our left,
and they got at least one of them as we saw the cloud of black smoke rising
after their attack. We couldn't (or didn't) do much but sit and take it all
in and try to avoid their moaning minnies. It was a long day."

"Prior to becoming an Argyll, I had served with the Stormont Dundas and
Glengarry Highlanders - from June 1942 till January 1944. I was with C Company,
14 Platoon, of the Glens, and we had a platoon Sgt. named Sacco Hummell,
who had a voice that only his mother could love, and once heard would never
be forgotten. He was a great guy. Late on the night of August 10, 1944, we
were notified that we would be relieved soon and would be withdrawing back
to where we had started the previous day. It was quite dark when our relief
arrived on the scene and of course we could only tell that some bodies had
appeared by the shuffling and mumbling that we could hear from these new
arrivals. Needless to say we were delighted that we were getting out of that
hell hole and didn't really care who our relief was, just as long as they
relieved us!! Well, can you imagine my surprise when the group relieving
our platoon approached and I immediately recognized the voice of good old
Sacco directing his men to their respective locations. Yes, we were relieved
in that dark night on Hill 195, during a lull in the shelling by 14 platoon
of the Glens. During the brief period in which they took over our trenches
I was able to contact three or four other old comrades from my former outfit-
in the middle of the night and in the middle of the war. A memorable experience."


"We moved back several miles that night to reorganize, and found ourselves
about two hundred yards in front of a battery of medium artillery. It was
not a very quiet place to be. They were firing right over our heads and the
enemy were firing back trying to knock them out. One enemy shell hit what
must have been a powder supply for one of the guns (55's) and I can still
see one of the Artillery types running across the field with his clothes
on fire. Would you believe that we thought that it was funny at the time
and laughed at the poor guy's misfortune?? We stayed there for a couple more
days and prepared for what became known as Operation Totalize."
  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#6 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,118 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 28 April 2006 - 08:18 AM

http://brisbois.halisp.net/index8.htm

From that site.

Adam Sherrif Scott's painting of the Canadian Grenadier Guards 22nd Armoured.

Battle for Hill 195 on 10 August, 1944.
It is my understanding from reliable sources that the soldier in the fox hole beside the soldier with the outstretched arms is my father Gdsm. Kenneth Brisbois D26851. He and his crew were knocked out during the battle and rejoined later in another tank

Attached Files


  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#7 Kieran Bridge

Kieran Bridge

    Junior Member

  • Registered Users
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts

Posted 01 July 2008 - 06:11 PM

I believe a Canadian production company is currently making a film of this action.
Found this on the Web.
In early November 2004 he (Rob Child) was signed by veteran Canadian producer Dick Nielsen
to direct and co-produce Nielsen's forthcoming Canadian theatrical release,
Hill 195. The project, which has the support of the Canadian government,
begins filming in Southern Ontario in 2006. Hill 195 is a multi-million dollar
World War II era action-feature, which showcases the heroic actions of a
single Canadian regiment just weeks after D-Day


I contacted Rob Child and he advised that the film production is not going ahead.

I suggested a film showing both sides' perspective on the Battle of the Falaise Gap, but did not hear back from him.

Kieran
  • 0

#8 Trevster

Trevster

    Junior Member

  • Registered Users
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts

Posted 01 July 2008 - 09:09 PM

Very interesting Owen, thank-you.
  • 0
We are the dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

John McCrae.

#9 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,118 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 02 July 2008 - 07:09 AM

Cheers for the update Kieran,
Shame that they're not going to make the film. :(
  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#10 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,118 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 09 September 2010 - 08:51 AM

I forgot Paul uploaded the war diary to flickr.
http://www.ww2talk.c...-war-diary.html
Here's relevent pages.
All available sizes | 2009_0331_104125AA | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
Posted Image

All available sizes | 2009_0331_104130AA | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Posted Image

Edited by Owen, 09 September 2010 - 08:58 AM.

  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#11 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,118 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 09 September 2010 - 09:26 AM

This is how the battle is described in the ASH of C history.

Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#12 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,118 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 09 September 2010 - 08:51 PM

When I started thread I didn't have a scanner, now I have I may as redo the memorial plaque so it is easier to read.
http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=36042&d=1284065508

Attached Files


  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#13 Medic7922

Medic7922

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 351 posts
  • LocationSouth Gloucestershire

Posted 10 September 2010 - 07:30 AM

I noted in the War Diary the "Lincoln & Welland Regiment" I have never heard of them I have tried to Google but no luck, I am only guessing could this be a Canadian Regiment.
  • 0
:poppy: Remembering the Lockwood, Knight, Osgothorpe & Haddigan family who served fought & died in both wars :poppy:

Old age and Treachery will overcome Youth and Skill.

#14 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,118 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 10 September 2010 - 07:35 AM

I noted in the War Diary the "Lincoln & Welland Regiment" I have never heard of them I have tried to Google but no luck, I am only guessing could this be a Canadian Regiment.

Yes, indeed they are.
Orbat of 4th Cdn Armd Div here.

4th Canadian (Armoured) Division - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There is a book called The Lincs by Geoffrey Hayes that outlines their war.
The Lincs: A History of the Lincoln and Welland Regiment at War, by Geoffrey Hayes
Posted Image
  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#15 17thDYRCH

17thDYRCH

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 1,079 posts
  • LocationToronto

Posted 10 September 2010 - 03:12 PM

Medic7922
You might enjoy this book..."Because We Are Canadians, a Battlefield Memoir" writen by Charles D. Kipp. Sgt Kipp was with the Lincoln and Welland Regiment from Normandy through to Germany. Wounded 9 times.
ISBN 1-55054-955-3
  • 0

#16 Dog green 1

Dog green 1

    Member

  • Registered Users
  • PipPipPip
  • 44 posts

Posted 07 November 2010 - 10:24 PM

Very interesting topic. Many thanks for posting.
  • 0

#17 canuck

canuck

    Token Colonial

  • Registered Users
  • 2,516 posts

Posted 08 November 2010 - 11:49 PM

Noted military author and historian Lieutenant Colonel JA English has called the battle at HILL 195 the most impressive single action executed in OPERATION TOTALIZE


Innovative and successful actions like that of the Argyll's don't seem to merit much historical attention. Other than the quote from JA English, I've seen no other examination or assessment of those events.
  • 0

“Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.” – Steven Wright.


#18 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,118 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 08 November 2010 - 11:52 PM

Sucessful actions don't make the headlines like failures & defeats.
Excellent action, glad I went there & correspond with someone who was there back in '44.
  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#19 Mike L

Mike L

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,061 posts
  • LocationHornchurch, Essex

Posted 09 November 2010 - 12:04 AM

Well said Owen, couldn't agree more. I am sure there are hundreds, if not thousands of outstanding actions, both large and small, perhaps individual actions even that very few people have ever heard of for some reason or another.
In many cases the lack of an Officer present was, I believe, reason enough for what were outstanding acts of gallantry not to be recognised. See the few occasions where an 'enemy' Officer cited individual acts for awards. I know this happened several times for Allied awards but did an Allied Officer ever cite an enemy serviceman for an award?

Mike
  • 0

#20 Art Bridge

Art Bridge

    WW2 Veteran

  • Veterans
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 14 November 2010 - 02:09 AM

Taken from Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders of Canada website.http://www.ashofc.ca/ASHFRAME.htm

We visited this area in October 2005.


HILL 195 is the highest piece of ground on the road from CAEN to FALAISE. In the summer of 1944, the Canadian Army in France was advancing down this road as part of OPERATION TOTALIZE. Naturally, HILL 195 was identified as vital ground and an attack was organized to take it.
HILL 195 - THE ARGYLL ATTACK
By 10 August 1944, the Argylls were in the village of LANGANNERIE just a few kilometres north of HILL 195. The order came down from brigade HQ that the Argylls were to take the hill that night. The Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Dave Stewart, chose an unorthodox plan. Following a well-reconnoitred route, the battalion would set off single file through the dark, slip through German lines and silently occupy the hill before the Germans knew they were there.
The Argylls crossed the start line at 0001 hours (12:01 am) on 11 August 1944 and were on HILL 195 by 0430 hours (4:30 am) following a circuitous route to the east and northeast of the hill. Most of the surprised German garrison of about 50 were taken prisoner without a shot being fired. The hill was taken without a single Canadian casualty. "C" and "D" companies dug in on the forward slope; "A" and "B" companies dug in on the reverse slope.
In the half-hour of darkness before dawn, the Argylls worked madly (assisted by their German prisoners) to consolidate their position. It was soon discovered that one foot down in the soil was an impenetrable layer of chalk. The Argylls were to hold the hill from some very shallow trenches. Vehicles towing 6 pounder and 17 pounder antitank guns made their way through the dark to link up and support the unit before first light.
At first light, the Germans (surrounding HILL 195 on three sides) reacted immediately. Soon heavy mortar fire was falling on the Argylls. A German counter attack on the "A" Company position failed and 27 German prisoners were taken.
The tanks of The 22nd Canadian Armoured Regiment (The Canadian Grenadier Guards) were supposed to pass through the Argylls and exploit the breach in the German lines. The ferocity of the German counter attacks stopped these efforts cold. At noon, the tanks of The 21st Canadian Armoured Regiment (The Governor Generals Foot Guards) were sent forward to assist in the battle and would remain in the fight for the remainder of the day.
In the afternoon, heavy artillery and air support was made available to the Argylls and the Germans suffered many casualties as a result. The last German counter attack was beaten off at 1930 hours (7:30 PM). At 2100 hours (9:00 PM), the Argylls were relieved by The Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders. The Argylls had lost seven killed and 24 wounded holding the hill.
Noted military author and historian Lieutenant Colonel JA English has called the battle at HILL 195 the most impressive single action executed in OPERATION TOTALIZE.

Hello Moose;
I just found this item, and I remember it well!!!
Art Bridge,ASHCAN
  • 0

#21 17thDYRCH

17thDYRCH

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 1,079 posts
  • LocationToronto

Posted 14 November 2010 - 11:30 AM

Art

Good to see you back on the forum,

My Dad was in 7th Recce,3rd Div.

Cheers from Toronto

Randy
  • 0
Avatar: 17th Duke of York's Royal Canadian Hussars (7th Recce Regiment )

#22 JonS

JonS

    Member

  • Registered Users
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 28 January 2011 - 10:24 AM

Innovative and successful actions like that of the Argyll's don't seem to merit much historical attention. Other than the quote from JA English, I've seen no other examination or assessment of those events.

See: Brian Reid "No Holding Back"

Excellent book all round.

Regards
Jon
  • 0

#23 martin14

martin14

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 367 posts

Posted 29 January 2011 - 04:57 PM

Interesting thread, thank you gents !
  • 0

#24 Tom Canning

Tom Canning

    WW2 Veteran

  • Veterans
  • 6,723 posts

Posted 29 January 2011 - 06:22 PM

Owen -
Just yesterday a Canadian woman was on to say that she was following up a relative who had been killed at the "Battle of the Bulge" on the 8th of August '44 - this is typical family folk lore as the Battle of the Bulge was on December 16th - thru January '45 -

She must have meant the opening of the Totalize Operation when he was killed - but the thread was gone before I could answer ....
Cheers
  • 0

#25 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,118 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 29 January 2011 - 06:27 PM

Owen -
Just yesterday a Canadian woman was on to say that she was following up a relative who had been killed at the "Battle of the Bulge" on the 8th of August '44 - this is typical family folk lore as the Battle of the Bulge was on December 16th - thru January '45 -

She must have meant the opening of the Totalize Operation when he was killed - but the thread was gone before I could answer ....
Cheers

see here.
http://www.ww2talk.c...t-regt-rca.html

now back to Hill 195.
:)
  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#26 Rob Dickers

Rob Dickers

    10th MEDIUM REGT RA

  • Registered Users
  • 1,282 posts
  • LocationLondon

Posted 29 January 2011 - 11:57 PM

I have noted in some accounts i've read on the action, that there was some criticism of the lack or lateness of heavy artillery support from 9th-14th Aug.
On the 10th Aug the HQ 2nd Cdn Army Group Royal Artillery (2CAGRA) was under constant shell fire and then bombed by planes of the RAF-RCAF
and was put out of action for 3 days suffering 24 casualties.
Rob

Edited by Rob Dickers, 30 January 2011 - 10:22 AM.

  • 0


12311726876_74a8350ed7_t.jpgArchive of 10th (R/Fus) Medium Regt RA
from16th Battalion Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regt)





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users