Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Dubrovnik / Balkans


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Belly

Belly

    Engage the enemy more closely

  • Registered Users
  • PipPipPip
  • 60 posts

Posted 20 March 2011 - 03:51 PM

Hi

I’m off to Dubrovnik in the summer and wondered if there were any WWII sites to see in the area and if there were any book recommendations about the action there?

I know 43 and 3 commando saw a lot action on the islands off the Balkans

Cheers
Belly
  • 0

#2 Drew5233

Drew5233

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 25,205 posts
  • LocationLeeds, West Yorkshire

Posted 20 March 2011 - 04:01 PM

The only place I know is the Island of Brac a bit further north off the coast of Split (There's a memorial on the island). A forum member went to Dubrovnik last year for a vacation-They maybe able to give you some pointers.
  • 0

#3 Ron Goldstein

Ron Goldstein

    WW2 Veteran

  • Veterans
  • 5,729 posts
  • LocationLondon

Posted 20 March 2011 - 04:20 PM

Belly

Back in 1988 my wife & I had a super stay at Dubrovnik.

This was before the "recent" warfare and we were therefore able to visit the original bridge at Mostar !

Can't help you with any military sites but DONT miss a trip to Mostar.

Our hotel was the Exelsior which, in those days, was beautifully sited for views of the old town and I was able to sketch from our terrace.

You are in for a treat and don't forget to take your camera :rolleyes:

Ron

Attached Files


Edited by Ron Goldstein, 20 March 2011 - 04:26 PM.

  • 0

If I am not for myself, then who will be for me?
And if I am only for myself, what am I?
And if not now, when?
Rabbi Hillel circa 30 BCE


:peepwalla:

 

I was "called-up", as a 19 year old, on the 1st of Oct 1942 and was one of 5 serving brothers, one of whom, Jack, was in RAF Bomber Command and was killed on March 16th 1945.

I served as a Driver/Op (Wireless Operator) with the 49th Light Anti Aircraft Rgt. (78 Div) from Apr 1943 to Dec 1944 (North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Egypt). The Regiment was disbanded in Dec 1944 and I was retrained (in Italy) by the Royal Armoured Corps.

 

Finally, I served as Loader/Op with the 4th Queen's Own Hussars (6th Armd.,78th & 56 Div) from Mar 1945 to Dec 1946 (Italy, Austria, Germany) finishing up as Tech Cpl. for "A" Sqdrn.  I was "De-mobbed" in Apr 1947

http://www.blogger.c...947129038825503


#4 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,188 posts

Posted 20 March 2011 - 04:56 PM

The only place I know is the Island of Brac a bit further north off the coast of Split (There's a memorial on the island).


Photo of memorial plate

British forces on island of Brac | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Apparently, there are remains of German coastal artillery's positions and some bunkers on locality of Wood Mala Petka on the Lapad Peninsula, which is part of Dubrovnik, some of them transformed to viewpoints.

Velika i Mala Petka – zelena gradska oaza

Sorry, site is in Croatian but here translation of some parts of the text

After fifty meters leads to the branch where you left a gentle slope can lead to the former bunker of the Second World War II, a current point on the ridge of Mala Petka, offering a beautiful view of the open sea.

.....


By the way, we pass the remains of houses dating from the World War II, which probably served as a command post nearby coastal artillery positions. And this is part of the track in a few places can turn to the steep coastal cliffs Male Petka.

.....


To this view remain longer in memory will serve two recently built gazebo at the site of the former position of the German coastal artillery from the World War II. Climb this trail is not marked, but it is clearly visible in the macchia. Of course all the way to be very careful and not approach the edge of the hills too.

Walk this trail begins above the second lookout point near Cape Petke and lead a narrow path, in part through a dense thicket over a dozen of the former strongholds of the German coastal artillery from the 2nd World War II. On the southern slopes of the Male Petke are still visible former coastal artillery positions, which was built by the German Wehrmacht, the defense then this strategically important area. There are three small and one large concrete placement for the guns, one machine gun and several smaller at the top Male Petka. Gun strongholds were built of concrete placement round, where he was placed in a long-range coastal gun directed towards the sea and the supporting concrete underground room where they were housed dormitories, warehouses, food and weapons and other facilities.


  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#5 dave3164

dave3164

    @davidcarter1978

  • Registered Users
  • 180 posts

Posted 20 March 2011 - 05:46 PM

Brac is a beautiful island I did some adventure training in Supetar in 1996 and would recommend it. Didn't realise there was a memorial there though.
  • 0
Celer et Audax
"Swift and Bold"

#6 Drew5233

Drew5233

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 25,205 posts
  • LocationLeeds, West Yorkshire

Posted 20 March 2011 - 06:43 PM

Cheers Sol,

I was there in 2001 on a weeks adventure training and we walked up to the top of a mountain which had a memorial and some caves IIRC.
  • 0

#7 Belly

Belly

    Engage the enemy more closely

  • Registered Users
  • PipPipPip
  • 60 posts

Posted 21 March 2011 - 08:09 PM

Thanks Chaps

Quite an artist there Ron I'm impressed!

I have turned up one book, Commando Force 133 by Brian Hawkinson, an out of print history of the island of Vis in World War II

Not much else though

Cheers
Paul

  • 0

#8 dbf

dbf

    Captionless

  • Registered Users
  • 12,922 posts
  • LocationState of Moribund

Posted 21 March 2011 - 08:37 PM

Belly
We had a family holiday there last year during a heatwave of 40+ degrees celsius - even the locals were complaining. Unfortunately I got a lot of curious looks and shrugs when asking about any WW2 History.

The small synagogue in Dubrovnik old town has a memorial display to the Jews who died during WW2; no photos allowed inside as this is very much a place of worship. I still have a small leaflet somewhere, which was obtained from there.

The Napoleonic fort on top of Mount Srd which you can get to by cable car, dealt with the more recent history, something which naturally preoccupies the locals much more. Lots of stuff on display there, not all under glass.

I spent most of my time with the book "Dubrovnik in War" [the Homeland war that is] hunting down locations for Now and Then photos.

BTW Euros also welcome in shops and restaurants - if you happen to have some with you.

Attached Files


Edited by dbf, 21 March 2011 - 10:18 PM.

  • 0

#9 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,188 posts

Posted 21 March 2011 - 08:45 PM

I have turned up one book, Commando Force 133 by Brian Hawkinson, an out of print history of the island of Vis in World War II


Paul, there are many military objects on the Vis but many of them are built after the war, like underground tunnels. It was important naval base of Yugoslav navy.

Secret army tunnels prove tourist draw | Reuters
  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#10 Ron Goldstein

Ron Goldstein

    WW2 Veteran

  • Veterans
  • 5,729 posts
  • LocationLondon

Posted 22 March 2011 - 05:27 AM

Diane

Although the synagogue does not permit the use of cameras within the actual prayer hall, when we were there the museum curator was quite happy to be snapped with Nita in the entrance hall which then, if my memory serves me well, acted as a small museum,

Ron

Attached Files


  • 0

If I am not for myself, then who will be for me?
And if I am only for myself, what am I?
And if not now, when?
Rabbi Hillel circa 30 BCE


:peepwalla:

 

I was "called-up", as a 19 year old, on the 1st of Oct 1942 and was one of 5 serving brothers, one of whom, Jack, was in RAF Bomber Command and was killed on March 16th 1945.

I served as a Driver/Op (Wireless Operator) with the 49th Light Anti Aircraft Rgt. (78 Div) from Apr 1943 to Dec 1944 (North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Egypt). The Regiment was disbanded in Dec 1944 and I was retrained (in Italy) by the Royal Armoured Corps.

 

Finally, I served as Loader/Op with the 4th Queen's Own Hussars (6th Armd.,78th & 56 Div) from Mar 1945 to Dec 1946 (Italy, Austria, Germany) finishing up as Tech Cpl. for "A" Sqdrn.  I was "De-mobbed" in Apr 1947

http://www.blogger.c...947129038825503


#11 dbf

dbf

    Captionless

  • Registered Users
  • 12,922 posts
  • LocationState of Moribund

Posted 22 March 2011 - 08:09 AM

Ron
Can only go by what was said last year.

Still trying to hunt down that leaflet.
  • 0

#12 dbf

dbf

    Captionless

  • Registered Users
  • 12,922 posts
  • LocationState of Moribund

Posted 13 April 2011 - 10:53 AM

Found it.

http://i899.photobuc...ds/IMG_1400.jpg

http://i899.photobuc.../IMG_1399-1.jpg

http://i899.photobuc...ds/IMG_1398.jpg

Edited by dbf, 13 April 2011 - 11:02 AM.

  • 0

#13 Ron Goldstein

Ron Goldstein

    WW2 Veteran

  • Veterans
  • 5,729 posts
  • LocationLondon

Posted 13 April 2011 - 11:37 AM

Diane

Found it.



Well done !

Ron
  • 0

If I am not for myself, then who will be for me?
And if I am only for myself, what am I?
And if not now, when?
Rabbi Hillel circa 30 BCE


:peepwalla:

 

I was "called-up", as a 19 year old, on the 1st of Oct 1942 and was one of 5 serving brothers, one of whom, Jack, was in RAF Bomber Command and was killed on March 16th 1945.

I served as a Driver/Op (Wireless Operator) with the 49th Light Anti Aircraft Rgt. (78 Div) from Apr 1943 to Dec 1944 (North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Egypt). The Regiment was disbanded in Dec 1944 and I was retrained (in Italy) by the Royal Armoured Corps.

 

Finally, I served as Loader/Op with the 4th Queen's Own Hussars (6th Armd.,78th & 56 Div) from Mar 1945 to Dec 1946 (Italy, Austria, Germany) finishing up as Tech Cpl. for "A" Sqdrn.  I was "De-mobbed" in Apr 1947

http://www.blogger.c...947129038825503


#14 cash_13

cash_13

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 596 posts

Posted 31 August 2011 - 10:34 PM

Dubrovnik is one of the most beautiful cities in Europe and the people are very friendly I would recommend it to anyone and don't forget to try their local dish...cant spell it but say it as I write it... Razenitch they serve it on the beach in the new town....tastes wonderful....
  • 0
Family Cyril Claude Phillips Leading Stoker HMS Warspite

Grand Father Cyril George Pickford Private Royal Engineers

Great Grand Father George Pickford Private Royal Engineers

Great Uncle Harold Pickford Private Royal Army Service Corp

Grand Father Thomas Finney Seaman HMS Ramillies

Wifes Great Grandfather Major Charles Spurling

#15 Vili Garvin

Vili Garvin

    Member

  • Registered Users
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 02 September 2011 - 10:08 AM

Unfortunately I got a lot of curious looks and shrugs when asking about any WW2 History.


There are two simple explanations for this.

First, Dubrovnik was essentially untouched by WW2 in the sense of battles, damage and conflict. The whole area managed to escape most of the hostilities irrespective of who carried them out.

Second, Dubrovnik was within a region which was a major supporter of the Fascist NDH government then in Croatia and, by default, the Italian and German 'occupiers'. In effect, what efforts the people of Dubrovnik and the immediate surrounds too, were on the side of Axis powers. Dubrovnik lost its Jewish population very quickly with little encouragement from Berlin. Something they're a bit shy recounting to foreigners....


On the general note of WW2 'war' sites close to Dubrovnik. The Allies missed the place completely and landed further north up the Croatian coast - and then headed north. So if 'sites' involving British forces is what you're after, you've got a long drive to contemplate. And, when you do so, you may find very little to observe as memorials are few and far between and come with little advertisement. This is again due to where the local population's sympathies lay in WW2 and also the way history was told for 50 years in Yugolsavia - they liberated themselves, apparently!
  • 0

#16 leccy

leccy

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 166 posts

Posted 02 September 2011 - 11:10 AM

I suppose there was one benefit of being in the FRY during the 90's for a couple of tours. I got to see an awful lot of kit from WW2 that was still in use (sometimes too close) and we had a weapon store of 'found or handed in items' that had a few WW2 era German and Russian heavy weapons in (or copies).

Spent a short time on Brac but never knew any plaque was there.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users