Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

3/2 Gurkhas in the Arakan.


  • Please log in to reply
146 replies to this topic

#1 bamboo43

bamboo43

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,536 posts
  • LocationHounslow, but would like a flat in Kew.

Posted 21 January 2011 - 12:16 PM

Hi All,

I have been tracking the WW2 journey of the 3/2 Gurkha Rifle battalion. They provided one half of the infantrymen for Chindit 1, with the 13th King's Liverpool the other.

I have built up a list of casualties for the battalion and have picked out some re-occuring dates when these men were either KIA or wounded.

I am aware that the battalion moved back to India after Chindit 1 and then re-fitted and ended up eventually in the Arakan offensive.

Can anyone tell me where they were on any of the following dates?

30/04/1944

15/01/1945 (I think this is the action on the Myebon Peninsula, Arakan)?

05/03/1945

Any help greatly appreciated.

Steve.
  • 0

#2 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 21 January 2011 - 01:04 PM

Steve you have right about 15 Jan 1945, battalion really was in action on Myebon Peninsula as part of 74th Brigade.

On 12 January the commandos made initial landings on the Myebon Peninsula, some 30 miles south of Akyab, to be followed on 14 January by 74th Brigade. the walk-over of Akyab was not repeated. Not only were commandos and Indians up against a desperate, suicidal, resistance, but the country over which fighting was taking place was substantially favourable to defence; a land of Mangrove swamps spreading over hundreds of square miles, treacherous quick sands into which a man could sink thigh deep in a matter of seconds, cut up by tidal chaungs and creeks in which, at the turn of the tide, the current attained the speed of mill race. Yet in spite of these difficulties, tanks of 19th Lancers landed with infantry, probing for stretches of firm ground, and aiding very materially in the destruction of fixed defences and bunkers which otherwise would have proved dangerously costly to overrun.

Both commandos and 74th Brigade made steady progress up the peninsula against stubborn opposition, especially on the 16th at the Kantha Chaung where the 74th brigade had to fight hard to clear a company of 111th Regiment from a strong position on a Pagoda topped hill.


On 5 March 1945, the battalion was in Tamandu area, and on that day Bhanbhagta Gurung "won" his Victoria Cross.

In spite of the force closing in, the Japanese made determined effort to hold Tamandu. The surrounding country had been heavily fortified, the defence prepared on much the same pattern as those of Razabil which had proved such an obstacle at the beginning of the 1944 campaign; a tumbled mass of hillocks each converted into a miniature fortress, the whole system interconnected by tunnels, the main bastion being the hill designated "Snowdon". The fighting lasted several days rivalling that of Kangaw in its Ferocity. The Lancers operating under most adverse condition did invaluable work in softening up the bunkers, aided in this task by air strikes by dive bombers, but the brunt of the action was borne by 3/2nd Gurkhas and the 7/16th Punjabs. It was during the attack on Snowdon that Lance Naik Bhanbhagta Gurung of the Gurkhas won the Victoria Cross ...


Edited by sol, 21 January 2011 - 01:13 PM.

  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#3 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 21 January 2011 - 01:20 PM

By the end of April 1944, 25th Indian Division was in Maungdaw area but some units from the Division supported 26th Indian Division in their operations around Tunnels and Point 551.
  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#4 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 21 January 2011 - 01:33 PM

The 3rd Battalion landed at Ru-Ywa and advanced to the high ground east of Tamandu. Capturing the area would assist British progress to the Irawaddy through the An pass, but the enemy here was the formidable Japanese 54 Division and a machine-gun battalion, the newspaper said.

The dominant feature was .582, nicknamed Snowdon, to the east of which was another high hill known as Snowdon East. No enemy was encountered on either hill and by the evening of March 4 "A" Company was in position at both points.

However, during the night the Japanese attacked Snowdon East in overwhelming strength, killing half the Gurkhas on it; the remainder, completely out of ammunition, managed to cut their way through to their comrades on Snowdon.

The following day "B" Company, with which Bhanubhakta was serving, was ordered to retake Snowdon East "regardless of cost".

Complete article you have here. Also from The Times

The action for which he was awarded the VC followed 25th Indian Division’s landing at Ru-ywa on the Burma coast, an operation designed to divert Japanese attention away from General Sir William Slim’s main offensive towards Mandalay in February 1945. 25th Division’s advance to the Irrawaddy through the An pass was fiercely opposed by part of the Japanese 54th Division holding a series of hill features, including one code-named “Snowdon East”, near the village of Tamandu. 3rd/2nd Gurkha Rifles fought for two days to take and hold Snowdon but might have been denied their victory had it not been for Bhanbhagta.

The battalion’s supporting artillery had to cease firing when the leading rifle platoons began to incur casualties from supporting rounds falling short, because of crest clearance difficulties. The section of which Bhanbhagta was a member was then pinned down by machine gun fire, and a Japanese sniper in a tree added to the menace.

Unable to get the required rifle elevation from the prone position, Bhanbhagta stood up and shot the sniper dead. After that the section advanced until, 20 yards from the objective, it was held up again. Without waiting for orders and shouting for the rest of the section to follow, Bhanbhagta charged towards the top of the hill. He threw two grenades into an enemy fox hole directly above him, killing the two occupants before rushing to the next enemy trench which he cleared with the bayonet.

Savage hand-to-hand fighting then ensued with no quarter given. Bhanbhagta cleared two more foxholes single-handed. For a fifth time he went forward alone and leapt on the roof of a bunker to throw two phosphorous grenades into the slit. Two burning and partially blinded Japanese ran out and he killed them both with his kukri.

Crawling into it, he crushed the surviving machine gunner’s head with a rock, as there was insufficient room to swing his kukri. He then organised a Bren light machine gun to fire from the bunker, and his leadership of this small party was largely responsible for repelling the subsequent enemy counter-attack.

Snowdon East was taken but Bhanbhagta’s company lost half its men dead and wounded; 66 Japanese dead were counted. Bhanbhagta was awarded the Victoria Cross and the 2nd Gurkha Rifles the battle honour “Tamandu” to add to their many others.

Havildar Bhanbhagta Gurung, VC | Times Online Obituary
  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#5 bamboo43

bamboo43

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,536 posts
  • LocationHounslow, but would like a flat in Kew.

Posted 21 January 2011 - 01:49 PM

Many thanks sol,

I'm a bit embarrassed for not remembering Bhanbhagta's VC action.:rolleyes:

Maungdaw sounds right for 30/04/44.

There is one more prevelant date on the lists, that being 08/09/44?

Any further ideas?:)
  • 0

#6 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 21 January 2011 - 01:57 PM

Little more about April 1944

In April 1944 the division took over from 36th British Division in the area of Maungdaw-Buthidaung. Its task was to guard the “ Maungdaw Keep,” maintain the Maungdaw-BuXthidaung road, which runs across the Mayu range horn east to west, and watch 15 Corps’ southern flank.


25divpush
  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#7 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 21 January 2011 - 02:18 PM

There is one more prevelant date on the lists, that being 08/09/44?

Any further ideas?:)


Actually yes I have. About that period 3/2nd Gurkhas was engaged in the struggle for Point 1433 and the feature called "Tiger". I don't have some specific info about operation (seems it was designated the Operation "Tweezers") but I have recommendations for some officers and other ranks of the battalion for medals, which could give you a relatively good picture about battle. If you don't have them I can post it here.
  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#8 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 21 January 2011 - 03:59 PM

Not exactly about 3/2nd Gurkhas but about generally XV Corps during September 1944.

In pursuance of the Corps policy of anticipating the enemy on important tactical features, and with the object of securing bases for operations directly the monsoon was over, moves were made by 25 Indian Division during September. As events proved, it was not always possible to anticipate the enemy, and sharp fighting on a small scale was frequently necessary to evict him. By the middle of September units of 25 Indian Division were firmly established along the main spine of the Mayu Range. Small but violent enemy counterattacks on the nights 14th/15th and 15th/16th were heavily repulsed, as was another determined attack at the end of the month. The situation then was:

25 Indian Division:—patrolling to the east and south-east down the Kalapanzin River, after having advanced well south of the Tunnels Area.

26 Indian Division:—one brigade in the Taung Bazaar and Goppe Bazaar areas respectively, with one brigade in reserve.

81 (West African) Division:—continuing its concentration which had begun some three weeks previously in the Singpa area (five miles west-north-west of Mowdok).


http://www.ibiblio.o...zette/39187.pdf
  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#9 bamboo43

bamboo43

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,536 posts
  • LocationHounslow, but would like a flat in Kew.

Posted 22 January 2011 - 11:36 AM

Actually yes I have. About that period 3/2nd Gurkhas was engaged in the struggle for Point 1433 and the feature called "Tiger". I don't have some specific info about operation (seems it was designated the Operation "Tweezers") but I have recommendations for some officers and other ranks of the battalion for medals, which could give you a relatively good picture about battle. If you don't have them I can post it here.



Sol,

I would be interested in anything you have in this regard.

Many thanks as always.

Steve.
  • 0

#10 bamboo43

bamboo43

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,536 posts
  • LocationHounslow, but would like a flat in Kew.

Posted 22 January 2011 - 03:32 PM

Hi All,

The last and perhaps the most intriguing date on the list of casualties is 01/11/1948!!! I am trying to decide whether this is just end date for service within the late British Indian Army or an actual action involving the battalion after independence/partitioning?

Thanks.

Steve.
  • 0

#11 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 04:06 PM

Hi All,

The last and perhaps the most intriguing date on the list of casualties is 01/11/1948!!! I am trying to decide whether this is just end date for service within the late British Indian Army or an actual action involving the battalion after independence/partitioning?

Thanks.

Steve.


Steve, seems that by 1 Jan 1948, 2nd Gurkhas became part of the British instead of the Indian Army. And during 1948 both battalions were based in Malaya. I will say that he died during the Malaya Emergency as it started somewhere in June that year.

2nd_Gurkha_Rifles
  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#12 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 04:10 PM

Regular Substantive Lieut.Colonel Reginald Antony Hutton, OBE
IA.79
3rd Bn, 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

Awarded with Distinguished Service Order

Operation "Tweezers" 7 Sep 1944 – 12 Sep 1944
Lt.Col. R.A. Hutton commanded a Task Force that had its objective the pt. 1433 feature on the Mayu Range (PM 434371). Pt. 1433, include its satellite "Tiger" is strategically of great importance since it commands one of the important lines of communication across the Range, and its capture was absolutely essential in order that the Corps plans for the opening seasons could be put into effect.

The plan off attack demanded an encircling movement of some three thousend yards through the densest of jungle and across ravines and gorges. For various reasons the final assault could not be directly supported by artillery and the air, and it involved a climb over 500 feet up the mountain side against strongly held bunkered position.

Surprise was achieved, and the objective secured after four days fighting at relatively small cost. Col. Hutton's handling of operation was beyond praise. His preliminary planning was a model, and his determination to succeed despite all obstacles and difficulties, including bad weather and counter attacks, showed qualities of leadership and initiative of an exceptionally high order.

He is fully deserving of the immediate award for which he is recommended.

General Auchinleck with a Japanese Sword | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#13 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 04:12 PM

Regular Captain (T/Major) Adrian Goodenough Hayter
3rd Bn, 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

Awarded with the Military Cross

It was the task of B Coy 3/2 G.R., under command of Major Hayter, to capture the feature "Tiger" about 500 yards south of Pt 1433, the main objective on the Mayu Range. Having established one platoon on the feature "Horse", 200 yards south of "Tiger", Major Hayter skilfully moved the remaining two platoons through thick jungle on the steep hill side and had them formed up, unheard by the enemy, in position east of the objective by 0400 hrs on 8 Sep. '44. At 0500 hrs the assault was launched. As control was practically impossible, Major Hayter accompanied one platoon, portions of which arrived with him inside the enemy defences on "Tiger". Several men were killed and woundeed by heavy enemy small arms and grenade fire. Seizing a Bren from a wounded man, Major Hayter engaged a bunker at a few yards range and kept down the fire from it until his gun jammed. Three enemy grenades burst within a few feet of him. He then decided to withdraw the survivors of the Platoon to reorganise. Shortly afterwards his second Platoon got into the enemy defences and, although wounded and having only nine men with him, he again attacked. Enemy small arms and grenade fire from all sides was very heavy and Mayor Hayter was again wounded. His second platoon was forced out of position and so he withdraw with his small party. Not until he organised the remnants of the two Assault platoons on the east of "Horse" and successfully repelled the counter attack which he had anticipated did Major Hayter report at Bn Tac H.Q., from where he was sent to R.A.P.

Throughout the action Major Hayter desplayed courage initiative, determination and leadership of the highest order.


  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#14 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 04:13 PM

W/S Jemadar (P/A/Subedar) Chandrabir Thapa
6270
3rd Bn, 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

Awarded with the Military Cross

Subedar Chandrabir was commanding a Platoon of A Coy, which reached the crest of the Mayu Range south of Pt 1433 at 0500 hrs on 8 Sep. '44. He at once led his platoon Northwards to attack the main objective. Heavy enemy grenade, M.M.G. and other small arms fire was immediately encountered. Skilfully leading his men by the most promising route and driving the Japanese out of their forward posts he reached a strong bunker containing at least one M.M.G., near the top of the feature. He had now lost about half of his platoon, and as he did not consider himself sufficiently strong to overcome the bunker, he took up a position only a few yards from it. For three hours he continued under fire, to encourage his men and harass the enemy, whom he prevented from launching a counter attack. He was finally ordered by his Company Commander to withdrawa to a more favourable position a little to the South. He extricated his men, took up his new position and consolidated without further loss.

Throughout the arduous approach march and the intense fighting on the crest he displayed indomitable courage and inspired his men with his cheerful spirit of determination.


  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#15 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 04:14 PM

I'll post couple more later.
  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#16 bamboo43

bamboo43

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,536 posts
  • LocationHounslow, but would like a flat in Kew.

Posted 22 January 2011 - 04:30 PM

W/S Jemadar (P/A/Subedar) Chandrabir Thapa
6270
3rd Bn, 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

Awarded with the Military Cross


Chandrabir Thapa was wounded for a second time at the Tamandu action.
  • 0

#17 bamboo43

bamboo43

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,536 posts
  • LocationHounslow, but would like a flat in Kew.

Posted 22 January 2011 - 04:31 PM

Sol,

A wonderful effort mate, many thanks.

Steve.:D
  • 0

#18 bamboo43

bamboo43

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,536 posts
  • LocationHounslow, but would like a flat in Kew.

Posted 22 January 2011 - 04:34 PM

sol,

Would you like a copy (Excel) of the listing I am working from?
It's the least I can do really!:)
  • 0

#19 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 06:37 PM

As promised

P/A/Havildar Ranu Pun
6861
3rd Bn, 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

Awarded with the Military Medal

Hav. Ranu commanded his platoon with gallantry and distinction throughout the operation which resulted in the Capture of Pt.1433 and "Tiger". He was mainly responsible for repelling the repeated enemy counter attacks against our newly gained positions North of Pt.1433 on the night of 8/9 Sep. '44. Had he failed to inspire his men with his own will and determination to hold his by no means strong position, the whole operation might have failed. He skilfully handled his platoon in a faint attack on "Tiger" at o5oo hrs on 12 Sep. and obtained information of the greatest importance. Later in the morning, by maintaining pressure, he discovered that the enemy were no longer in strength on "Tiger". He systematically closed in under fire, and without incurring a single casualty drove the remaining enemy from their positions with grenade and 2" Mortar fire. This brilliant little action cleared the way to the recently occupied Pt.1433 and allowed an L and C along the spine to be opened and a track to be constructed without delay.

This young N.C.O. displayed devotion to duty of a very high order and was an inspiration to all ranks.


  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#20 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 06:39 PM

W/S Naik Amarbahadur Pun
1832
3rd Bn, 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

Recommended for the Indian Order of Merit (II Class)
Awarded with the Military Medal

Nk. Amarbahadur Pun was Actg. Platoon Havildar of one of the Platoons of B Coy which assaulted “Tiger“ from the East at 0500 hrs on 8 Sep. '44. In the first attack he was wounded in the hand, neck and arm, but joined Major Hayter's party of nine men in the second attack. He had taken a Bren gun from one of our casualties and, although under fire from three different directions, he stood in an exposed position and kept up a steady fire on a located enemy bunker. He did not take cover even when changing magazines. His fire was seen to inflict casualties on Japanese who tried to throw grenades, and give them little chance to leave their positions and counter attack. Under his fire some of our men crept forward and threw grenades into the enemy positions. He finally covered the withdrawal of the whole party, and eventually reached the R.A.P. alone.

His courage and devotion to duty were an inspiration to all ranks.


  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#21 wtid45

wtid45

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,550 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 06:39 PM

I have nothing to add......... just thought I would just pop in and say what a great thread this is guys nice one:D
  • 0
BORN BRITISH, WELSH BY THE GRACE OF GEOGRAPHY!

#22 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 06:41 PM

P/A/Naik Parbir Pun
25914
3rd Bn, 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

Awarded with the Military Medal

Naik Parbir was commanding a section of C Coy which scaled the cliffs and reached the crest of the Mayu Range North of Pt.1433. At 0430 hrs on 8 Sep. At 0500 hrs he led his section into the Assault under heavy fire with the greatest dash. He drove enemy from forward positions and finally seized a small hill 80 yards North of Pt.1433. He established his section on this hill and returned the enemy's fire with such effect that no counter attack was launched. He was later joined by portions of the two other sections of his platoon, which had now lost its Commander and 2nd i/c. He assumed command of the platoon, and organised it for all round defence. Although under constant fire from various enemy bunkers close at hand, he encourage his tired men and inspired them with his determination to hold his precarious position at all costs. This he did for ten hours until relieved by a Platoon of D Coy. This position, from which the enemy made determined efforts to dislodge our troops, was held throughout and without doubt made the enemy realise that his remaining positions on the feature were untenable and finally decide to withdraw.

This junior N.C.O. influenced the battle in away scarcely to be expected of one so young and displayed outstanding gallantry and powers of leadership under the most adverse conditions.


  • 1

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#23 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 06:43 PM

P/L/Naik Narjang Gurung
10040
3rd Bn, 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

Recommended for the Indian Distinguished Service Medal
Awarded with the Military Medal

L/Naik Narjang was commanding a section of A Coy, which reached the crest of the Mayu Range South of Pt.1433 at 0500 hrs on 8 Sep. '44. He gallantry led his section into the attack and overcoming opposition, occupied a Japanese position. Although under heavy fire from bunkers 30 yards away, he held his position until relieved on the following morning. He led an I.E. demolition party to some enemy bashas, where an ammunition dump was destroyed, and documents obtained. Some of the bashas contained food, water and bedding. These bashas he arranged to keep under fire from his section position and inflicted losses on the several enemy parties which tried to reach them by day and by night.

It was probably to no small extent due to his devotion to duty in holding his unfavourable position under adverse conditions that the enemy, deprived of his supplies, was soon forced to withdraw from Pt.1433.


  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#24 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 06:44 PM

Rifleman Haribahadur Khattri
28213
3rd Bn, 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

Recommended for the Indian Distinguished Service Medal
Awarded with the Military Medal

Rifleman Haribahadur is serving in a section of C Coy, which reached the crest of the Mayu range a little North of Pt.1433 at 0430 hrs on 8 Sep. '44. At 0500 hrs his section led the Assault on the enemy positions to the South. In the face of intense enemy M.M.G., small arms and grenade fire he was to fore and, passing Japanese bunkers, he reached the top of the objective alone. Looking back he saw one of our Bren gunners lying near an occupied enemy trench. In the thick jungle he could see none of our men, so he decided to attack the trench single handed. This he successfully did, killing or wounding several Japs with his grenades. Still under heavy fire from other positions he picked up our Bren, the rifle of another of our killed, one of the dead Jap's rifles and with his own arms intact succeeded in rejoining his section, which had been pinned by fire a little further North.

The courage, determination and devotion to duty of this young soldier in his first action, after an extremely arduous approach march, is in the best traditions of the Service.


  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#25 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 06:46 PM

sol,

Would you like a copy (Excel) of the listing I am working from?
It's the least I can do really!:)


You can upload it here and I'll see what I can find.
  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#26 bamboo43

bamboo43

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,536 posts
  • LocationHounslow, but would like a flat in Kew.

Posted 22 January 2011 - 09:43 PM

P/A/Naik Parbir Pun
25914
3rd Bn, 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

Awarded with the Military Medal


Parbir Pun was previously wounded during the actions on the Maungdaw/Buthidang road.
  • 0

#27 bamboo43

bamboo43

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,536 posts
  • LocationHounslow, but would like a flat in Kew.

Posted 22 January 2011 - 09:45 PM

Rifleman Haribahadur Khattri
28213
3rd Bn, 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

Recommended for the Indian Distinguished Service Medal
Awarded with the Military Medal


Haribahadur Khattri was eventually wounded in the build up to the Tamandu action in 1945.
  • 0

#28 bamboo43

bamboo43

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,536 posts
  • LocationHounslow, but would like a flat in Kew.

Posted 22 January 2011 - 10:05 PM

Ok,

With the massive input from sol over the last 2 nights here are the listings for 3/2 Gurkhas over the period of the war and a little beyond.

I tried to hand some reps out to the man but was told to spread it around a bit more!!!:)

Credit where credit is due say I.:D

Thanks also must go to a contact on another forum too. Thanks Chris.

Please feel free to download and use, also any comments or corrections are welcome.;)

Attached Files


  • 0

#29 sol

sol

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 2,198 posts

Posted 22 January 2011 - 10:24 PM

Steve I don't think that all those listed as died on 30 April 1944 were killed in some action. Especially because none was listed as wounded on that day. Is it possible that they were actually somehow connected with the first Chindit expedition and was pronounced as MIA but later that was changed as KIA. Similar with those listed as died on 1.11.1948. Just a thought.
  • 0

'The position as I see it at present could not possibly be worse and therefore inevitably must get better.'

Colonel Norman Eustace DSO,
OC 2/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Ningthoukhong, 12th June 1944


#30 bamboo43

bamboo43

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 3,536 posts
  • LocationHounslow, but would like a flat in Kew.

Posted 22 January 2011 - 10:40 PM

Steve I don't think that all those listed as died on 30 April 1944 were killed in some action. Especially because none was listed as wounded on that day. Is it possible that they were actually somehow connected with the first Chindit expedition and was pronounced as MIA but later that was changed as KIA. Similar with those listed as died on 1.11.1948. Just a thought.



Thanks for the input sol,

When I first got these lists last year and began to work on them, I wondered about that date as being of possible Chindit relevance? Firstly, as you say a kind of cut off period for those MIA in 1943 or found to be POW even. Then I wondered if some of the survivors from 'Longcloth' went back in on Chindit 2? They would have been attached to other units in this case though.

All if's and but's as usual mate.:)
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users