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British involvement in the Bulge


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#1 stolpi

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Posted 28 December 2010 - 07:20 PM

Cleaned up this old topic, as almost all pictures were lost due to the transfer to Invision.


 

 

For a short resume see: http://www.ww2f.com/...-ardennes-4445/


Edited by stolpi, 23 June 2013 - 04:37 PM.

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#2 Pieter F

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 08:59 AM

Great effort to start this thread Pieter! I agree with you that there is too less focus on the British efforts during the Battle of the Bulge. In the eyes of the Americans Montgomery behaved like Christ at the temple, which brought a lot of negativity.
But British forces indeed provided depth to the allied defences, sealing of the river Meuse and so the way to the German objectives.
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#3 Swiper

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 09:06 PM

2 Mons exploits in the Ardennes is also covered in Dennis Hoopers 'Not so bloody quiet on the Western Front', excellent stuff so far mate.

Still not up to the Ardennes in my work as a whole!
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#4 Earthican

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 09:38 PM

Earthican .... I hope you will find some time to illustrate the War Diary with your map.

I'll take a look at it tomorrow (unless you tired of waiting and started your own maps. ;))

[that wink looks more like a poke in the eye :P]

Later,
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#5 Oggie2620

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 09:54 PM

Was watching the Nazi Hunter programme on Freeviews Yesterday the other day and they were talking about the SAS guys who were executed in the Ardennes. RIP some brave guys...
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:poppy: RIP Sgt Edgar William Harvey RNZAF and his crew :poppy:

#6 Earthican

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 05:21 PM

Here's a map showing the companies of the 2nd Battalion The Monmouthshire Regiment. While the action is rather routine and painfully slow, it is representive of much infantry combat. It must also be a hard pill to swallow to take casualties without a sense of inflicting injury on the enemy. Only the knowledge the enemy was withdrawing, never to return, a consolation--- and to have survived.

Impressive support by 144 RAC on top of the Bois de Hampteau feature on 4 Jan. Although the map does not show it, the forest is likely cut up by fire-breaks and logging trails.

I had to guess at the route A Coy took to reach WAHARDAY on 8 Jan.

http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=42848&stc=1&d=1293895839

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Edited by Earthican, 01 January 2011 - 03:32 PM.
map edits

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#7 Earthican

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 05:43 PM

BTW, the US 84th Infantry and 2d Armored Division were north of R. L'Ourthe and advancing SE.

Always helpful:

The 53rd consisted of

71st Infantry Brigade

* 1st Battalion, Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry
* 1st Battalion, Highland Light Infantry
* 4th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers

158th Infantry Brigade

* 1st Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment
* 7th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers
* 1/5th Battalion, Welch Regiment

160th Infantry Brigade

* 6th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers
* 2nd Battalion, Monmouthshire Regiment
* 4th Battalion, Welch Regiment

Divisional Troops

* 1st Battalion, Manchester Regiment (Machine-Gun Regiment)
* 53rd Regiment, Reconnaissance Corps
* 81st Field Regiment, Royal Artillery
* 83rd Field Regiment, Royal Artillery
* 133rd Field Regiment, Royal Artillery
* 71st Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Artillery
* 244th Field Company, Royal Engineers
* 282nd Field Company, Royal Engineers
* 555th Field Company, Royal Engineers

Edited by Earthican, 31 December 2010 - 06:31 PM.
Clarify

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#8 Rob Dickers

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 05:51 PM

Corps Artillery
Rob

5AGRA – XXXCorps.
In action Nth of NAMUR with;
52nd Heavy Regt RA
7th, 64th and 84th Medium Regts RA
4th, 5th RHA
109 HAA Regt RA
27 LAA Regt RA
73rd A/Tank Regt RA

4AGRA – X11Corps
In action Sth of NAMUR with;
HQ and 2 (unnamed) Field Regts RA

Reserves on call;
43rd Division Artillery
50th Division Artillery
32 Guards Artillery
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12311726876_74a8350ed7_t.jpgArchive of 10th (R/Fus) Medium Regt RA
from16th Battalion Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regt)


#9 Swiper

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 06:53 PM

BTW, the US 84th Infantry and 2d Armored Division were north of R. L'Ourthe and advancing SE.

Always helpful:

The 53rd consisted of

71st Infantry Brigade

* 1st Battalion, Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry
* 1st Battalion, Highland Light Infantry
* 4th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers

158th Infantry Brigade

* 1st Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment
* 7th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers
* 1/5th Battalion, Welch Regiment

160th Infantry Brigade

* 6th Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers
* 2nd Battalion, Monmouthshire Regiment
* 4th Battalion, Welch Regiment

Divisional Troops

* 1st Battalion, Manchester Regiment (Machine-Gun Regiment)
* 53rd Regiment, Reconnaissance Corps
* 81st Field Regiment, Royal Artillery
* 83rd Field Regiment, Royal Artillery
* 133rd Field Regiment, Royal Artillery
* 71st Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Artillery
* 244th Field Company, Royal Engineers
* 282nd Field Company, Royal Engineers
* 555th Field Company, Royal Engineers


They also had:
285 Field Park Coy
25 LAA Regt
53rd Welsh Divisional Signals
53 Welsh Divisional Field Park
147 Field Ambulance
202 Field Ambulance
212 Field Ambulance
13 Field Dressing Station
26 Field Dressing Station
53 Field Hygene Section
53rd Welsh Divisional Provost Coy
11th Field Security Section
in addition, Mobile Dental Units, Inf Brigade Workshops and 11 Light Aid Departments, Cash Office and Postal Unit standing out


I think 11 FS Section will be most useful there mind, and Dressing/Ambulances for study of casualties etc.
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#10 levien

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 12:15 AM

Very nice and detailed work. Chapeau!
But ... there were also men from 6th AB involved in the january fighting. Don't forget them.

Levien.
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#11 GPRegt

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 03:25 PM

Very condensed account of 6th AB Divn's intial experiences in the Ardennes until beginning of Jan:

20 Dec - 6th Airborne received orders to move to Belgium
23rd - Sailed for Europe
24th - Arrived at transit camp in Ostend
26th - concentrated in an area between Dinant and Namur
29th - ordered to advance against the enemy


The Battle for Bure

13th Parachute Bn entered Bure against fierce enemy fire, taking a large number of casualties. Then began a series of battles fought from house to house, which eventually led to the Bn establishing itself at the crossroads in the centre of the village. Tiger tanks were then thrown into the mix and the battling continued until the 5th when the Bn with support from 2nd OBLI commanded the whole village. The 13th’s casualties amounted to 7 officers and 182 O/Rs.


[FONT="][FONT=Arial]Steve W.[/FONT]
[/FONT]
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#12 levien

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 09:38 AM

Thanks Steve.

Levien.
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#13 wtid45

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 11:47 AM

I wonder if anyone has some further details on the move of the 6th AB Div to Belgium in December 44, the scramble from the barracks in Engeland to Belgium.

Unfortunately I only have the Bde War Diaries for January 45, when the move had already been completed.

Some of the posts here might be of help :unsure: http://www.ww2talk.c...e-accounts.html
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#14 Trpr Hughes

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 12:42 PM

Staged images of 53rd Recce men in the Ardenne.

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#15 Earthican

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 08:25 PM

I needed to summarize the WD to figure this out. I can't see any way to sensibly plot these movements on one map (not to mention too little detail about exact routes). Best to study the map and summary, then re-read WD. I added yellow triangles for the high ground or hilltops mentioned.

It seems the SQN's withdrew from their advance positions the nights of 25/26 Dec and 26/27 Dec (as was usual practice for armoured forces if the situation permits).

22 Dec
Orders to delay east of the Meuse then withdraw back across (west of) the Meuse
Later, orders to defend river crossings
[assume decision to defend from positions previously selected for delay, A SQN at Sorinne, C SQN at Achene and B SQN west of the Meuse]

23 Dec
B SQN moved east of the Muese and south of A SQN [to Boiselles?]

24 Dec
Contact with enemy advancing from the southeast
C SQN moved to position north of A SQN [?]
Mid-day all SQN close back on bridgehead, B at bridge(Dinant), C to the northeast (Loyers), A to the east (Gemechenne)

25 Dec
Orders to attack with objective 084887 (Achene), B SQN advance to Sorinne and Foy-Notre-Dame, C SQN advance to Boisselles
[armour withdraw for evening?]

26 Dec
A and B SQN return to Foy-Notre-Dame, C SQN return to Boiselles, later A SQN advance to Celles
[armour withdraw for evening?]

27 Dec
A SQN move to high ground east of Sorinne

28 Dec
Move to new area of operations (Finnevaux) south of present positions


http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=43481&stc=1&d=1294863886

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#16 Bluebell21

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Posted 13 January 2011 - 02:21 PM

Hello. This is my first time posting anything so I am not quite sure if this is OK.

My father was a Staff Sergeant with REME. LAD, attached to 1st.Northamptonshire Yeomanry. During his time in Europe he kept a note book of the places and dates of all the movements of 1.NY. The following are the moves in the Ardennes.

19th.Dec : Moved from Holland
25th.Dec : Florennes
27th.Dec : Namur.
2nd. Jan. : Namur to Aye,Marche
4th to 11th Jan. “Op Mullet” - to La Roche
23rd Jan.: Moved to Ciney and onwards to Kalcar for the Rhine crossing, (replacing
the Sherman tanks for the Buffaloes

I have a couple of photos of the LAD recovering tanks in La Roche and one of the 6th Airborne at Aye,Marche, also a copy of Capt. Neville’s detailed account of “Op Mullet”
If I can manage to upload these onto this thread, if anyone is interested, I will try to.

Having followed the journey of 1.NY from Normandy to the Rhine crossing myself in 2009 and 2010 I would like to find out how to obtain a copy of 1.NY war diaries and also, if this is separate, the LAD diaries. I found a lot if info from the excellent museum in La Roche regarding 1.NY and 51st.HD very helpful.

Cheers,
Ken.
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#17 Bluebell21

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Posted 13 January 2011 - 09:17 PM

Not very good photos of :

6th A.B at Aye,Namur
Sherman in ditch
Inverted tank ( can anyone identify?)

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#18 Owen

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Posted 13 January 2011 - 10:38 PM

that's a 51st Div Archer upsidedown
46 signifying the AT Regt of the Divsion, in this case,
61st Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Artillery

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#19 Bluebell21

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 10:01 AM

Many thanks for the ID. I would assume that this casualty would not be the problem of 1.NY. LAD. The recovery task would be for parent Regt? unless just to move to clear the route?
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#20 Earthican

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 03:37 PM

It seems the SQN's withdrew from their advance positions the nights of 25/26 Dec and 26/27 Dec (as was usual practice for armoured forces if the situation permits).


Initially, they withdrew into a closer perimeter around Dinant. Also, because they had scant infantry protection and the mission was to hold the crossing of the Meuse (Sqns forming leaguers). Later, nights of 25/26 Dec and 26/27 Dec, when the enemy threat had receded, they stayed further east (see below).


You seem to indicate that C SQN occupied Achene on the 22 and 23 Dec but withdrew each night closer to Dinant. That would add up for the night of 23/24 Dec. Other sources indicate that the lead elements of 2 PzDiv passed through Achene on the early evening 23 Dec (presumably after C SQN withdrew for the night) and halted around Foy at mid-night. Then, perhaps, C SQN returned to Achene in the morning of 24 Dec with the main German forces to the south of the Dinant-Ciney highway. Later on the 24th, C SQN withdraws using a route north of the main highway.

Do we know if there was any contact around Achene the night of 23/24 Dec?

Do we know if the night positions for 3 RTR on 22/23 and 23/24 Dec included Sorinne?

I've read accounts of this battle but never in detail, so there's a number of things about this battle that puzzel me. Hope we get to some of them.
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#21 Earthican

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 08:36 PM

Every time I get a book that has contemporary maps or aerial photos, I always wish they would leave the map or photo alone and mark their interpretation of the battle on a matching sketch. So I followed my own advice.

Here's a first cut at covering 23 to 26 Dec. Blue: 3 RTR, Red: 2 PzDiv and Green: US 2AD. The lighter shades indicate the first position or movement. The darker shade indicates activity after the light shade.

I can revise this until we think we got the best possible and then maybe post the final with an unmarked contemporary topo map.

**I should not have been surprised that my source was wrong. Lead elements of 2PzDiv did not pass through Achene.

**There's an un-marked sketch on the attachments for anyone that wants to take a stab at illustrating this action.

http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=43587&stc=1&d=1295037088

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#22 Earthican

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 11:15 PM

Then, at 1200 hrs, no. 1 Tp A Sqn at BOISELLES (0385) knocked out a half track and one other vehicle. This means one Troop of A Sqn was at Boiselles.

Any chance 1 Tp A Sqn stayed in BOISELLES the night of 23/24 Dec? If not, did they move there from SORINNE and by what route?

According to the WD A Sqn falls back to Gemechenne at 1200 hrs.

Do you think this means SORINNE was un-occupied by British forces? It occurred to me that just A Sqn withdrew for the night and some infantry force remained.

24 dec: 1100 hrs: Two PANTHERS knocked out by no. 3 Tp A Sqn at SORINNE (according to Delaforce they came from the southeast).

Do you think the Panthers were in SORRINNE or maybe just outside FOY? With the open valley between the two towns it seems possible for a 17 pdr.

Edited by Earthican, 14 January 2011 - 11:44 PM.
added question three

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#23 Earthican

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 05:38 PM

Movement to Boiselles:
Delaforce indicates for Dec 24th, that the move out of C Sqn at first light into battle positions was accomplished without incident. So, it seems that the tanks leaguered at Sorinne during the night.

Do you mean A Sqn? On the 24th, IIRC, C Sqn was in Achene and had to withdraw to the northwest.


It seems plausible that no. 1 Troop moved south by Foy Notre Dame to Boiselles to block the main road there.

My sources indicate that the lead elements of 2PzDiv reached Foy by the night of 23/24 Dec. Of course they could be wrong or just using a shorthand for having reached the woods and Farm east of Foy (why not, who's going to check?). The story of Captain Davey could be a tragic error for orders to go to Boiselles without additional information that Foy was not occupied by friendly forces and advise to backtrack to the west. On the otherhand if 1 Trp A Sqn moved Sorinne-Foy-Boiselles without incident that morning, that would explain the assumption that Foy was clear.



With the first map I indicated a German effort toward the highground (with a small wood) east of Sorinne. This was to show perhaps the German did get a roadblock in. This seems within the capabilites of the Germans if the British were not defending here. Recall C Sqn took a northwest route back from Achene to avoid a possible roadblock. Later, on 25 Dec, I recall the British clearing that high ground.

One question I have is: how hard did the Germans push for Sorinne on 24 Dec? Panthers knocked out in Sorinne would indicate a pretty hard effort. But then when the British withdrew did the Germans occupy Sorinne? We haven't fully developed the events of 25 Dec. I don't recall a fight to return to Sorinne, but the WD is pretty understated, its hard to say.

Still on 24 Dec, C Sqn is reported to have destroyed a PzIV, so I'm wondering if I should show a German effort toward Achene.

Sources indicate the Germans short of fuel and "lethargic". I can see this for armor but infantry, as you cite, was infiltrating. Also my sources are silent about air activity on the 24th. That would also keep the armor undercover and perhaps allow the British 17 pdrs to "snipe" German Panthers at range.



For the evening of the 24th, Delaforce indicates, that the 3rd RTR fell back into a tighter perimeter around Dinant. With B Sqn forward looking south, south east and east. C Sqn echeloned back a little, looking east and north east. While A Sqn pulled back to Onhaye, west of the Meuse, in anti-paratroop role. No. 1 Tp in Dinant. The WD does not mention this move.

This all adds up for events of 25 Dec, where B Sqn leads out to Sorinne and C Sqn swings to the south.

This update reflects the Germans not in Foy on the morning of 24 Dec plus the other corrections.

http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=43629&stc=1&d=1295117188

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Edited by Earthican, 15 January 2011 - 06:47 PM.
25 Dec map updated with clarified 3RTR start positions

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#24 Earthican

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 07:14 PM

Bois de Geauvelant (the wood east of Foy Notre Dame) should been the German main position. It's the best defensive ground they occupied. This is often called the battle of Celles, but it's my guess the Germans retreated there after losing the wood and the Farm. Why did the Germans seem so weak? It may be either the Germans were intent on attacking west and did not have the strength to cover their northeast flank, or the British had their full attention, or the air power and lack of fuel totally crippled their strength or all three. Puzzling to me.

Then there is still the story of Task Force B, CCB, 2AD attacking through Conjoux. I have not seen a write-up on the resistance they encountered.

Here's a detail map of the main battle area (unmarked).

http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=43647&stc=1&d=1295118801

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#25 Earthican

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 11:19 PM

Here's a complete set of skeches. Added events of 26 Dec and marked the Squadrons by letter.

Curious to know the average tank strength of the squadrons and the vehicle mix of the RB companies (carriers, lorries, halftracks?)

http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=43649&stc=1&d=1295133502

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#26 Earthican

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 06:39 PM

Before we leave this area of operations for the next...

Oddly I found myself reviewing Cole to sort out some questions in my mind, and I found I could piece together a pretty good summary of the German journey to the Celles-Foy battlefield. There's a wealth of information in the US Army official history but since it is organized to provide the American point of view, it takes some effort to understand the German POV. I read this volume several times and it's an enjoyable read, but, there lies the difference between reading for pleasure and actually studying. Below I re-ordered excerps from Cole; the [#] indicates their original order. I bolded the parts dealing specifically with the forces that reached Celles-Foy. I also added dates and locations in [ ].


[2] .... The 2d Panzer Division, its first objective Marche, had the shortest road to follow but was delayed for several hours by the demolitions at the crossroads west of Champlon touched off by the detachment of the 51st Engineers. Not until early afternoon did the leading battalion of the 304th Panzer Grenadier Regiment overrun the 4th Cavalry Group outpost at Harsin, and it was dark when this battalion fought its way into Hargimont, there severing the road from Marche to Rochefort.

Inexplicably the forward momentum of the 2d Panzer main column ceased early in the evening [22/23 Dec]. When Luettwitz, the corps commander, hurried into Hargimont, he found that the attack had been halted for the night because American tanks were reported north of the village. Stopping briefly to tongue-lash and relieve the colonel in command, Luettwitz put in a fresh assault detachment which pushed west as far as Buissonville and there bivouacked. The appearance of this force was responsible for the reports reaching American headquarters shortly before midnight that Company E of the 333d had been trapped in Buissonville.

Chief protagonist of the advance on the VII Corps thus far chronicled has been the main column of the 2d Panzer Division, which on the night of 23 December had its head at Buissonville and its body snarled in a long traffic jam on the single road through Hargimont, Harsin, and Bande. But German armored cars, tanks, and motorized infantry detachments had been encountered west and southwest of Marche all during the day. These troops belonged to the 2d Panzer reconnaissance battalion that during the night was attempting to reassemble as a homogeneous striking force west of Buissonville astride the road to Dinant. It was the point of this battalion which Collier's armored infantry encountered at Leignon [events described in [1] below].



[5] During the night [22/23 Dec] the Humain-Buissonville road had been jammed with German columns from the 2d Panzer reconnaissance battalion and advance guard. But now the wealth of good, hard-surfaced roads which characterize this part of Belgium came into play. Entering the main highway at Buissonville, the German units had gone north for about a mile, then made a V-turn back onto a secondary road running straight west to Conjoux, a village four miles south of Ciney. The Belgian telephone operator at Conjoux attempted to get word of this movement to the Americans, but the message had to pass surreptitiously through a number of hands and did not reach the 2d Armored command post until the afternoon of the 24th. The CCA sortie from Ciney, as a result, was being made obliquely to the German axis of advance and would intersect the enemy line of march at Buissonville only after the leading kampfgruppe of the 2d Panzer had passed on to the west.



[1] ...CCA clanked through the darkness, led by a task force composed of the 2d Battalion, 66th Armored Regiment, and the 2d Battalion, 41st Armored Infantry Regiment. About 2100 [23 Dec] the combat command became involved in a scrambling skirmish with some Germans who had dismounted from half-tracks in the village of Leignon, wheeled a few small guns into position covering the road, and were now able to halt the Americans for some little time. ....



[3] Under the new orders to attack toward Rochefort, CCA had driven a few miles south of Leignon when Capt. George E. Bonney, riding at the head of the column in a jeep, heard the sound of motors on the road ahead. Bonney whirled his jeep and rode back along the column of American halftracks, passing the word to pull off the road and let the approaching vehicles through. When the small German column was securely impounded, the Americans cut loose with the .30-caliber machine guns on the halftracks, killing thirty of the enemy and capturing a like number. Bonney had his leg almost cut off by slugs from one of his own tanks farther back in the column. ...



[4] When daylight came on the 24th, the head of the leading kampfgruppe had advanced well to the northwest of the Marche-Rochefort road [Celles-Conjoux ??] in considerable strength . In this kampfgruppe were the reconnaissance battalion, one battalion of Panthers from the 3d Panzer Regiment, the 304th Panzer Grenadier Regiment, two artillery regiments, a battalion of heavy guns, and two-thirds of the division flak, the whole extending for miles.
The remainder of the 2d Panzer remained on the Harsin road southeast of Marche under orders from Luettwitz to protect the corps right shoulder.

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#27 51highland

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 06:48 PM

(3) Column of trucks and tanks moving along road. On the left backside of the truck the number 57 (?) is visible, filmshot also taken during later phase of Ardennes operation so must be 51st Highland Division.

Stolpi, not sure but it looks like D7 to me.
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51 highland "Don't leave me Sarge" & Keep 'em Moving

Là á Bhlàir's math na Càirdean

(Friends are good in the day of battle)


Na diobair caraid's a charraid
(Forsake not a friend in the fray)

Cuimhnichibh na suinn nach maireann .
Mairidh an cliu beo gu brath.
(In memory of the Heroes who are no more.
May their Fame live on forever)

#28 Bluebell21

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 09:46 PM

1st.Northamptonshire Yeomanry. LAD.

The dates and locations of the LAD from my father’s diary :

1st.Jan to 9th.Jan - Aye
9th.Jan to 23rd Jan. – Marche
23rd.Jan to 27th.Jan. – Ciney
27th.Jan. to 8th.Feb. X– Leuth

It was during the early part of January that he managed to chop off the end of his finger changing a drive sprocket and forgetting about the ice scraper on the backside. The cold being so intense that there was no pain and only realised what had happened when he saw blood stained snow. !
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#29 Bluebell21

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Posted 20 January 2011 - 02:29 PM

From my dad’s memories of the Ardennes campaign whilst serving with REME. LAD to the 1st N/Y was mainly of the extreme weather conditions when attempting to carry out their tasks of vehicle repair and recovery. He was at this period a 39 yr old Staff Sergeant
with an enormous amount of experience within REME, attached to an armoured regiment.He, unforfunatly, died 25 yrs ago and it is now that I deeply regret not asking for more details of his experiences during these times.
I do recall some of the comments that he made regarding the conditions in which the recovery of any vehicle be it tracked or wheeled was a major task. i.e. under enemy observation, mines and road surfaces in reaching the casualty and also the prevailing weather. The handling of equipment from hand tools, shackles, tow bars and wire ropes etc, if placed on the ground within a very short time would become frozen on the spot making the task even more difficult.
After recovery to a reasonable safer working area the same cold conditions applied whilst carrying out repairs.
I remember him telling me about one of the LAD lads, who, whilst repairing a vehicle touched his ear and the bottom, his ear – lob, snapped off with the intense cold. Fortunately, a nearby Canadian apparently experienced about extreme cold conditions, grabbed a handful of snow and slapped it over the lad’s ear, saving any further damage.
Attached are a couple of my dad’s photos in the Ardennes.


  • Photo of himself and other LAD lads taken on New Year’s eve/45 after fishing with hand-grenades on the banks of the river Meuse at Namur.
  • Changing a Sherman engine, location unknown. (Possibly Aye?)

Cheers, Ken.

Attached Files


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#30 Bodston

Bodston

    Little Willy

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Posted 20 January 2011 - 02:35 PM

Who can help me out with the ID of the British units on the attached stills:

(1) Sherman tank belongs unmistakable to the 33rd Armoured Brigade, the unit insignia (black triangle, with inverted green triangle on top) is visible on the left backside of the tank, underneath the axe. But where stands the painted 53 on the right backside for? This Arm of Service marking seems to indicate the junior regiment of 33rd Armoured Brigade which at the time was 144th Royal Armoured Corps, (144th RAC)

See still: Still viewer

(2) Sherman tanks in the later phase of the Ardennes operation near La Roche. They must be of the 33rd Armoured Brigade, at that time the only armoured unit around. But where stands the 51 on the side of the tank cupola for? This large number painted on the turret was also used by 144th RAC as a callsign to identify individual tanks. 51 would have belonged to B squadron.

See Still: Still viewer

Same spot 3B painted on back side of cupola: This Sherman Ic Firefly is different, the only regiment that comes to mind that used Shermans and the number/letter combination in this position is the Coldstream Guards from Guards Armoured Division. Still viewer


(3) Column of trucks and tanks moving along road. On the left backside of the truck the number 57 (?) is visible, filmshot also taken during later phase of Ardennes operation so must be 51st Highland Division. That does look like D7 to me. It was not unusual for RASC service units not to carry much in the way of markings. The D7 could just be to identify the individual lorry within its unit.

See still: Still viewer


Some observations added.
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My mother told me, I never should, play with the gypsies in the wood.




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