Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Miscellaneous units


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
No replies to this topic

#1 Trux

Trux

    21 AG

  • Registered Users
  • 1,225 posts

Posted 29 August 2010 - 08:03 PM

MISCELLANEOUS UNITS

There were various units for holding and processing reinforcements, training (which was
always ongoing), leave, rest camps and personnel in transit.

Any large organisation gathers a number of units which are essential but difficult to classify.
These are included here.


CONTENTS.
REINFORCEMENT, TRAINING and LEAVE.
Headquarters Reinforcement Group. War Establishment XIV/1632/1. July 1944.
Headquarters Reinforcement Group. War Establishment XIV/1632/2. March 1945.
Reinforcement Holding Unit. War Establishment XIV/1633/1. July 1944.
Reinforcement Holding Unit. War Establishment XIV/1633/2. March 1945.
Reinforcement Sub Unit. War Establishment XIV/1634/1. July 1944.
Reinforcement Sub Unit. War Establishment XIV/1634/2. March 1945.
Special Training Cadre RAC. War Establishment XIV/1640/1. June 1944.
Leave Unit. War Establishment XIV/2027/1. November 1944.
Holding and Selection Centre. War Establishment XIV/2026/1. September 1944
Port Staging Camp ATS. War Establishment XIV/602/1. October 1944.
Rest Camp. War Establishment XIV/641/1. November 1944.
Transit Camp. War Establishment XIV/643/1. November 1944.
Transit Camp Paris. War Establishment XIV/642/1. February 1945.
Reorganisation Centre. War Establishment XIV/2028/1. December 1944
Divisional Battle School Cadre. War Establishment XIV/1896/1. December 1944
Sniping School. War Establishment XIV/1130/1. December 1944.
No2 (Belgian) Training Team. War Establishment XIV/1897/1. December 1944.
No22 (Czechoslovak) Training Team. War Establishment XIV/1898/1. December 1944.
Physical Training School. War Establishment XIV/1899/1. December 1944.
Basic Training Team, Allied Liberated Manpower Battalions. War Establishment XIV/1900/1. February 1945.
War Dogs Training School Veterinary and Remounts. War Establishment XIV/1995/1. January 1945.

REALLY MISCELLANEOUS
Headquarters Pioneer Group. War Establishment IV/71/3. March 1944.
Headquarters Pioneer Company. War Establishment IV/72A/4. December 1943.
Smoke Company, Pioneer Corps. War Establishment IV/131/2. April 1944
Area Cash Office. War Establishment IV/62A/2. December 1943.
Financial and Audit Office. War Establishment XIV/55/1. June 1944
Command Pay Office, Base Type A. War Establishment XIV/1462/1. January 1945.
Command Pay Office, Base Type B. War Establishment XIV/1463/1. January 1945.
Transit Cash Office. War Establishment XIV/1461/1. March 1945.
Prisoners of War Accounts Office. War Establishment XIV/1460/1. September 1944
Administration Unit (Civil Labour). War Establishment XIV/1185/1. June 1944.
Light Monitoring Unit. War Establishment XIV/1151/1. October 1944.
Graves Registration Unit. War Establishment IV/146/2. February 1945
Headquarters Graves Concentration Unit. War Establishment XIV/1070/1. September 1944.
Graves Concentration Section. War Establishment XIV/1071/1. September 1944.
Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force Clubs. War Establishment XIV/2006/1. August 1944.
Aliied Expedionary Force Club No1. War Establishment XIV/2007/1. August 1944.
Headquarters Fire Fighting Company. War Establishment IV/91/2. March 1943.
First Class Fire Brigade. War Establishment IV/80/2. March 1943.
Headquarters Fire Boat Company. War Establishment XIV/1056/1. July 1944
Fire Boat Section. War Establishment IV/246/1. April 1944
Military Administrative Cadre with NFS Column. War Establishment XIV/1055/1. June 1944.
Headquarters Salvage Depot (Abroad). War Establishment XIV/196/1. November 1943
Base Salvage Unit (Abroad). War Establishment XIV/197/1. November 1943.
Salvage Collecting Centre (Abroad). War Establishment IV/198/1. November 1943.
British Staff for Prisoner of War Labour Company. War Establishment XIV/1520/1. October 1944.
British Army Newspaper Unit. War Establishment XIV/2008/1. February 1945.
Headquarters War Material Reconnaissance Team. War Establishment XIV/2029/1. January 1945.
Disbandment Control Unit. War Establishment XIV/2030/1. February 1945.
No3 Chemical Defence Laboratory. War Establishment XIV/959/1. April 1945.
Dog Platoon. War Establishment XIV/906/1. May 1945.
Welfare Equipment Depot (Rear). War Establishment IV/251/1. April 1944.
Welfare Equipment Supply section. War Establishment IV/252/1. April 1944
Welfare Equipment Depot (Advanced). War Establishment IV/253/1. April 1944.
Miscellaneous Appointments. War Establishment XIV/2025/1. February 1945.

ARMY KINEMATOGRAPH SERVICE
Army Kinematograph Service Exhibition Wing (Overseas). War Establishment III/251/2. December 1944
Army Kinematograph Service Company HQ (Overseas). War Establishment III/252/2. December 1944.
Army Kinematograph Service Section (Overseas). War Establishment IV/139/3. December 1944.
Army Kinematograph Service, Kinema Repair Detachment (Overseas). War Establishment IV/177/2. December 1944.
Army Kinematograph Service Section ATS (Overseas). War Establishment IV/273/1. December 1944.



REINFORCEMENT, TRAINING and LEAVE UNITS.
Headquarters Reinforcement Group. War Establishment XIV/1632/1. July 1944.
Headquarters Reinforcement Group. War Establishment XIV/1632/2. March 1945.
Reinforcement Holding Unit. War Establishment XIV/1633/1. July 1944.
Reinforcement Holding Unit. War Establishment XIV/1633/2. March 1945.
Reinforcement Sub Unit. War Establishment XIV/1634/1. July 1944.
Reinforcement Sub Unit. War Establishment XIV/1634/2. March 1945.
Special Training Cadre RAC. War Establishment XIV/1640/1. June 1944.
Leave Unit. War Establishment XIV/2027/1. November 1944.
Holding and Selection Centre. War Establishment XIV/2026/1. September 1944
Port Staging Camp ATS. War Establishment XIV/602/1. October 1944.
Rest Camp. War Establishment XIV/641/1. November 1944.
Transit Camp. War Establishment XIV/643/1. November 1944.
Transit Camp Paris. War Establishment XIV/642/1. February 1945.
Reorganisation Centre. War Establishment XIV/2028/1. December 1944
Divisional Battle School Cadre. War Establishment XIV/1896/1. December 1944
Sniping School. War Establishment XIV/1130/1. December 1944.
No2 (Belgian) Training Team. War Establishment XIV/1897/1. December 1944.
No22 (Czechoslovak) Training Team. War Establishment XIV/1898/1. December 1944.
Physical Training School. War Establishment XIV/1899/1. December 1944.
Basic Training Team, Allied Liberated Manpower Battalions. War Establishment XIV/1900/1. February 1945.
War Dogs Training School Veterinary and Remounts. War Establishment XIV/1995/1. January 1945.


REINFORCEMENTS
From D-day until D+8 reinforcements were despatched from UK to Corps Reception Camps and then distributed to units in the corps. A small clerical staff from GHQ 2nd Echelon was attached to each Corp Reception Camp. On D+8 101 Reinforcement Group landed on the Continent with 6,000 men and set up in the area of Bayeaux and then received all reinforcements.

Owing to a shortage of infantry, a decision was taken on 16 August to disband 59 Infantry Division and one brigade of 49 Infantry Division. Certain units thus released were broken up and the personnel used to make up the shortages.

Six reinforcement groups - 101, 102, 103, 104, 105 and 2 Armoured, were allotted to 21 Army Group. 101 Group arrived in June, 102 Group in July, 104 Group arrived in August, while 105 and 103 Gps landed in September. 2 Armoured Reinforcement Group controlled 2 Armoured Replacement Unit which in turn was responsible for forwarding RAC reinforcements through the Army, Corps and Forward Delivery Squadrons. 101 and 102 Groups moved forward with the armies and were fed by the others which remained in the L of C.

104 Reinforcement Group moved to Ostend in October and handled only reinforcements for the fighting arms. All remaining reinforcements were received by 105 Reinforcement Group at Dieppe. By this time some 500 personnel weekly were also being discharged from hospitals in the Rear Maintenance Area.

There was a continuing shortage of officers and men in infantry divisions. It was decided to disband 50 Division and to post the infantry personnel thus made available to other formations. There remained a shortage of infantry officers and RA, RASC and Pioneer officers were sent for retraining. A number of elderly or low category officers were also sent to release infantry officers employed in headquarters and staff roles.

For Operation Veritable and Operation Plunder each infantry battalion was posted from 50 to 100 ORs surplus to its War Establishment. 101 Reinforcement Group was given by Second Army enough transport to lift 1100 men each day.



HEADQUARTERS REINFORCEMENT GROUP
War Establishment XIV/1632/1. July 1944.
This headquarters administered a number of Reinforcement Holding Units, usually three although more was possible.

Colonel
Deputy Assistant Adjutant General
Major, Chief Instructor
Staff Captain ‘A’
Staff Captain ‘Q’
4 X clerk including
serjeant
corporal
2 X private
serjeant postal worker RE
transport corporal
vehicle mechanic
2 X postal dutyman
2 X driver IC
batman
2 X batman driver
3 X telephone orderly
motorcycle orderly
2 X cook

2 X bicycle
1 X motorcycle
1 X car 5cwt 4 X 4
1 X car 4 seater
1 X 15cwt GS

One car 2 seater may be added if the reinforcement holding units under command are widely dispersed.



HEADQUARTERS REINFORCEMENT GROUP
War Establishment XIV/1632/2. March 1945.
This headquarters administered a number of Reinforcement Holding Units, usually three although more was possible.

Colonel
General Staff Officer 2nd Grade
Deputy Assistant Adjutant General
Staff Captain ‘A’
Staff Captain ‘Q’
Subaltern, Transport Officer
4 X clerk including
Warrant Officer Class II
corporal
2 X private
serjeant postal worker RE
duty serjeant
cororal vehicle mechanic
vehicle mechanic
6 X postal orderly
2 X driver mechanic
6 X driver IC
2 X batman
batman driver
3 X telephone orderly
motorcycle orderly
2 X cook
mess orderly

Drivers, cooks and mess orderly may be civilian or allied enlisted personnel.

2 X bicycle
2 X motorcycle
2 X car 5cwt 4 X 4
1 X car 4 seater
3 X 15cwt GS
3 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS



REINFORCEMENT HOLDING UNIT
War Establishment XIV/1633/1. July 1944.
To administer three to five reinforcement sub units.
The Reinforcement Holding Unit was equivalent to a large battalion. Its function was to hold and train reinforcements for infantry units. Reinforcements arrived from the UK fully trained but a full training programme continued until the personnel were sent to join a battalion. Usually a holding unit held first reinforcements for a number of regiments.

Lieutenant Colonel
Major, Administrative Officer
Captain, Adjutant
Captain, Instructor
Medical Officer
Quartermaster

Regimental Serjeant Major
Regimental Quartermaster Serjeant
serjeant clerk
provost serjeant
serjeant, officers mess steward
serjeant, serjeants mess caterer
serjeant instructor APTC
serjeant armourer REME
serjeant cook
2 X serjeant, general duties

2 X batman
batman driver
butchery dutyman
4 X clerk including one corporal
3 X cook
4 X driver IC
2 X motorcycle orderly
2 X officers mess orderly
3 X serjeants mess orderly
medical officers orderly
corporal postal dutyman
3 X regimental police
sanitary corporal
shoemaker RAOC
2 X storeman
corporal water dutyman

2 X bicycle
4 X motorcycle
1 X car 2 seater
1 X 15cwt GS
1 X 15cwt water
2 X 3ton 4 X 4 GS
1 X water trailer



REINFORCEMENT HOLDING UNIT
War Establishment XIV/1633/2. March 1945.
To administer three to five reinforcement sub units.

Lieutenant Colonel
Major, Administrative Officer
Captain, Adjutant
Captain, Instructor
Captain, Posting Officer
Medical Officer
Quartermaster

Regimental Serjeant Major
Regimental Quartermaster Serjeant
Staff serjeant clerk
provost serjeant
serjeant, ration NCO
serjeant, officers mess steward
serjeant, serjeants mess caterer
serjeant instructor APTC
serjeant armourer REME
serjeant cook
3 X serjeant, general duties

2 X barber
2 X batman
batman driver
butchery dutyman
6 X clerk including one corporal
officers mess cook
serjeants mess cook
corporal cook
cook
7 X driver IC
transport corporal
2 X motorcycle orderly
2 X officers mess orderly
3 X serjeants mess orderly
2 X medical officers orderly
corporal postal dutyman
2 X postal dutyman
3 X regimental police
sanitary corporal
3 X shoemaker RAOC
2 X storeman
corporal water dutyman

Cooks, drivers and shoemakers may be civilian or allied enlisted personnel.

2 X bicycle
4 X motorcycle
1 X car 2 seater
1 X car 4 seater 4 X 2
1 X 15cwt GS
5 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS
1 X water trailer



REINFORCEMENT SUB UNIT
War Establishment XIV/1634/1. July 1944.
To administer 300 reinforcements.
The sub unit usually held first reinforcements for one regiment (which might have several battalions in the theatre). Unit pride was seen as important but it became increasingly difficult to ensure that replacements and returning wounded went to their own battalion.

Captain
Company Serjeant Major
company quartermaster serjeant
serjeant instructor
2 X clerk including one corporal
batman
storeman
2 X cook


REINFORCEMENT SUB UNIT
War Establishment XIV/1634/2. March 1945.
To administer 300 reinforcements.

Major
Captain
Company Serjeant Major
company quartermaster serjeant
serjeant instructor
duty serjeant
corporal clerk
2 X clerk
batman
storeman
serjeant cook
corporal cook
5 X cook
officers mess orderly
postal dutyman
general dutyman

2 X bicycle

Cooks, mess orderly and general dutyman may be civilian or allied enlisted personnel.



SPECIAL TRAINING CADRE RAC
War Establishment XIV/1640/1. June 1944.
There is no clue on the original document as to the purpose of this unit but it was probably to train existing units in the use of new equipment or tactics.

Captain
Subaltern
Squadron Serjeant Major
serjeant instructor
serjeant mechanist
corporal electrician

1 X 3ton 4 X 4 GS


LEAVE.
With the assistance of Belgian voluntary organisations (notably the Princesse de Ligne hostels) it became possible in October to begin short leave within the theatre. Hotels were requisitioned in Brussels, and clubs were started. Similar arrangements were made for short leave to start in Paris in November. This short leave was initially for forty-eight hours and later was lengthened to three days.

The provision of leave transit camps and the availability of shipping did not permit home leave to start until January when 3,000 personnel per day were sent via Harwich, Dover and Folkestone. The duration of leave was eight days in the UK.

By the end of April 460,000 officers and men had visited Brussels and Paris on short leave, while 412,000 hid been despatched to UK on privilege leave.


LEAVE UNIT
War Establishment XIV/2027/1. November 1944.
Consisting of Headquarters and a varying number of sub units
- Type A for 1000 other ranks in billets
- Type B for 2000 other ranks in hostels

Headquarters
Lieutenant Colonel
Major
Captain, Adjutant
Captain, Messing Officer ACC
Quartermaster
Regimental Serjeant major
Regimental Quartermaster Serjeant
5 X clerk including
serjeant
corporal
3 X clerk
batman
2 X batman driver
driver IC
2 X motorcyclist

1 X bicycle
2 X motorcycle
2 X car light utility
1 X car 4 seater

Type A
Captain
2 X Subaltern
company quartermaster serjeant
4 X serjeant
corporal clerk
clerk
8 X corporal
8 X lance corporal
batman
batman driver
driver IC
medical officers orderly
storeman

6 X bicycle
1 X car light utility
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS

Type B
Captain
2 X Subaltern
company quartermaster serjeant
8 X serjeant
corporal clerk
clerk
8 X corporal
4 X lance corporal
batman
batman driver
driver IC
medical officers orderly
storeman

2 X bicycle
1 X car light utility
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS

When Type B is detached it will be commanded by a Major instead of a Captain

Additional civilian labour may be employed
- up to 200 for Type A
- up to 700 for Type B

Four clerks may be ATS




HOLDING and SELECTION CENTRE
War Establishment XIV/2026/1. September 1944
Consisting of
Headquarters
Reception and Selection Wing
Headquarters including Standing Medical Board and Personnel Selection Staff
Reception Centre (Holding 300 other ranks)
3 X Companies (each holding 300 other ranks)
Holding and Despatch Wing
Headquarters
4 X Holding sub units (each holding 450 other ranks)

Headquarters
Colonel, Commandant
Deputy Assistant Adjutant General
Staff Captain A and Q
Staff Captain SP
Major, Welfare
Subaltern, Welfare

serjeant armourer
20 X clerk RASC including
Warrant Officer Class II
3 X serjeant
3 X corporal
3 X lance corporal
10 X clerk
3 clerks are shorthand typist
2 X clerk RASC, welfare including a corporal.
officers mess cook ACC
2 X cook ACC
driver mechanic
shoemaker RAOC
barber
3 X batman
5 X driver IC
corporal duty NCO
3 X motorcycle orderly
postal dutyman
2 X telephone orderly
water dutyman

Reception and Selection Wing
Lieutenant Colonel
Major, Administrative Officer
Captain, Adjutant
Medical Officer RAMC
Quartermaster
8 X clerk RASC including
serjeant
corporal
lance corporal
5 X clerk
2 X officers mess cook
4 X serjeants mess cook including a corporal
17 X other ranks mess cooks including two serjeants and two corporals
Regimental Serjeant Major
Regimental Quartermaster Serjeant
serjeant officers mess steward
serjeant serjeants mess caterer
8 X batman
butchery dutyman
7 X general dutyman including a corporal
edical officers orderly
2 X telephone orderly
2 X officers mess orderly
2 X serjeants mess orderly
7 X other ranks mess orderly
5 X regimental police including
serjeant
lance corporal
3 X private
2 X sanitary dutyman
storeman

Standing Medical Board
Lieutenant Colonel, President
Medical Officer
2 X Psychiatrist
2 X clerk RAMC
3 X clerk RASC

Personnel Selection Staff
Major
8 X Captain
staff serjeant tester
9 X serjeant tester
4 X clerk

Reception Centre
Captain
Subaltern
Company Serjeant Major
3 X duty serjeant
3 X duty corporal
5 X clerk RASC including
corporal
lance corporal
3 X clerk

3 X Company each
Captain
Subaltern
Company Serjeant Major
company quartermaster serjeant
2 X serjeant
4 X corporal
2 X clerk
storeman


Holding and Despatch
Lieutenant Colonel
Major, Administrative Duties
Captain Adjutant
Medical Officer RAMC
Quartermaster

5 X clerk RASC including
serjeant
corporal
3 X clerk
officers mess cook ACC
4 X serjeants mess cook including a corporal
22 X cook including two serjeants and three corporals
Regimental Serjeant Major
Regimental Quartermaster Serjeant
serjeant serjeant’s mess caterer
2 X serjeants general duties
4 X instructor APTC
2 X batman
butchery dutyman
medical officers orderly
officers mess orderly
serjeants mess orderly
5 X regimental police including a serjeant
sanitary dutyman
storeman

4 X Holding sub unit each
Captain
Subaltern
Company Serjeant Major
company quartermaster serjeant
clerk
batman
storeman

6 X bicycle
3 X motorcycle
2 X car light utility
1 X car 4 seater 4 X 2
1 X 15cwt GS
2 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS
1 X water trailer

All cooks, all clerks RASC, all storemen and all orderlies may be ATS.




A PORT STAGING CAMP ATS 21 ARMY GROUP
War Establishment XIV/602/1. October 1944.
To accommodate 150 personnel.
Subaltern
duty serjeant
corporal clerk
2 X cook
house orderly
lance corporal medical orderly
2 X mess orderly
2 X bicycle



A REST CAMP 21 ARMY GROUP
War Establishment XIV/641/1. November 1944.
For 1000 personnel.

Major
Adjutant, Subaltern
Quartermaster
Subaltern for entertainments
Subaltern

Regimental Serjeant Major
Company quartermaster serjeant
Serjeant clerk
5 X serjeant interpreter
2 X duty serjeant
serjeant, officers mess steward
serjeant, serjeants mess caterer

2 X clerk
2 X carpenter and joiner
painter and decorator
plumber and pipefitter
batman
batman driver
butchery dutyman
2 X driver IC
2 X duty corporal
10 X general dutyman
medical officers orderly, lance corporal
13 X officers mess orderly
11 X serjeants mess 0rderly
18 X rank and file mess orderly
7 X sanitary dutyman including one corporal
2 X storeman
water dutyman

Attached
Medical Officer RAMC
4 X officers mess cook ACC including one corporal
4 X serjeants mess cook ACC including one corporal
2 X serjeant cook ACC
4 X corporal cook ACC
16 X cook ACC

1 X bicycle
2 X car light utility
1 X 3ton 4 X 2

Notes:
Mess staffs are 50% more than usual to provide a 24 hour service.
All cooks may be civilian.
All rank and file except duty corporals and medical officers orderly may be civilian.





TRANSIT CAMP.
War Establishment XIV/643/1. November 1944.
Headquarters and 3 to 6 wings each to hold up to 1,700.

Headquarters
Lieutenant Colonel
Major 2 ic
Adjutant and Quartermaster
Regimental Serjeant Major
Regimental Quartermaster Serjeant
serjeant clerk RASC
2 X serjeant interpreter (may be civilian)
corporal clerk RASC
4 X clerk RASC
batman (may be civilian)
batman driver (may be civilian)
2 X driver (may be civilian)
2 X duty corporal
13 X general dutyman (may be civilian)
medical officers orderly
2 X ration storeman (may be civilian)

Medical Officer RAMC
officers mess cook (may be civilian)
2 X cook (may be civilian)

1 X bicycle
1 X light utility
2 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS

Each Wing
Major or Captain
Company Serjeant Major
company quartermaster serjeant
messing NCO
5 X interpreter (may be civilian)
officers mess steward (may be civilian)
serjeants mess caterer (may be civilian)
clerk RASC
batman driver (may be civilian)
butchery dutyman
duty corporal
64 X general dutyman (may be civilian)
medical officers orderly
23 X officers mess orderly (may be civilian)
19 X serjeants mess orderly (may be civilian)
30 X OR mess orderly (may be civilian)
ration storeman (may be civilian)
corporal sanitary dutyman (may be civilian)
10 X sanitary dutyman (may be civilian)
corporal officers mess cook (may be civilian)
5 X officers mess cook (may be civilian)
corporal serjeants mess cook (may be civilian)
5 X serjeants mess cook (may be civilian)
6 X serjeant cook (may be civilian)
3 X corporal cook (may be civilian)
27 X cook (may be civilian)

1 X bicycle
1 X light utility



TRANSIT CAMP PARIS
War Establishment XIV/642/1. February 1945.
This was to accommodate 150 officers and 150 other ranks in separate accommodation.

Captain, Commandant
2 X Subaltern, Assistant Commandant.
company quartermaster serjeant
4 X duty corporal
ration corporal
storeman
3 X clerk
batman
8 X general dutyman (may be civilian)
corporal cook (may be civilian)
3 X cook (may be civilian)
driver IC

ATS
serjeant
2 X duty corporal
3 X general dutywoman (may be civilians)
2 X cook

2 X bicycle
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS

For every 50 officers or other ranks above 300 all ranks the following will be added
general dutyman
cook




REORGANISATION CENTRE
War Establishment XIV/2028/1. December 1944
To reorganise units, mainly AA artillery, as infantry
Organised as a headquarters and two sections.

Headquarters
Major
Captain
Quartermaster
Regimental Serjeant Major
Regimental Quartermaster Serjeant

2 X clerk
2 X batman driver
8 X driver
3 X storeman

2 X light utility
2 X 15cwt 4 X 2 GS
6 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS

2 X section each
Captain
Subaltern
battery or company quartermaster serjeant
4 X duty serjeant
4 X bombardier or corporal storeman
44 X gunner or private for general duties (may be civilian)




DIVISIONAL BATTLE SCHOOL CADRE
War Establishment XIV/1896/1. December 1944
Lieutenant Colonel
Major, Senior Instructor
Captain, Administrative Officer
company quartermaster serjeant as administrative NCO



SNIPING SCHOOL
War Establishment XIV/1130/1. December 1944.
32 personnel under training

Major, Commandant
Captain or Subaltern Administrative Officer
4 X serjeant instructor
serjeant for Q duties
carpenter and joiner
driver mechanic
batman
batman driver
10 X general dutyman (may be civilian)
medical orderly
driver IC
storeman
2 X cook

1 X light utility
1 X 15cwt 4 X 2 GS
1 X 15cwt 4 X 4 GS




No2 (BELGIAN) TRAINING TEAM.
War Establishment XIV/1897/1. December 1944.
Administered by No2 Liaison Headquarters Belgian Forces.

RAC
Major
4 X Captain
4 X serjeant
2 X motorcycle
1 X light utility

RA
Major
2 X Captain
6 X Subaltern
2 X Warrant Officer, Assistant Instructor in Gunnery (Field).
6 X serjeant
6 X corporal
3 X motorcycle
3 X light utility
1 X 15cwt GS

RE
3 X Major
4 X Captain
company quartermaster serjeant
6 X serjeant
2 X motorcycle
2 X light utility

Infantry
Major
3 X Captain
4 X Captain or Subaltern
2 X Subaltern
Company Serjeant Major
company quartermaster serjeant
5 X serjeant
6 X corporal
3 X motorcycle
3 X light utility

RAMC
Major
Quartermaster
serjeant
1 X light utility

Local Administrative Personnel
7 X serjeant
5 X corporal
9 X batman
10 X batman driver
3 X clerk
driver IC

RASC
2 X Captain
staff serjeant mechanist
staff serjeant clerk
serjeant



No22 (CZECHOSLOVAK) TRAINING TEAM.
War Establishment XIV/1898/1. December 1944.
Major RAC
2 X Captain RAC
batman
batman driver
1 X light utility



PHYSICAL TRAINING SCHOOL
War Establishment XIV/1899/1. December 1944.
Captain
7 X Instructor APTC
company quartermaster serjeant
serjeant, serjeants mess caterer
clerk
corporal cook
2 X cook
batman driver
2 X general dutyman
storeman
sanitary dutyman
1 X 15cwt GS

Cooks may be civilian.



BASIC TRAINING TEAM, ALLIED LIBERATED MANPOWER BATTALIONS.
War Establishment XIV/1900/1. February 1945.

Major
Company Serjeant Major
6 X serjeant or corporal
instructor APTC
batman driver
1 X 15cwt GS



WAR DOGS TRAINING SCHOOL (VETERINARY and REMOUNTS).
War Establishment XIV/1995/1. January 1945.
This establishment was not in fact implemented. A similar unit was transferred from the UK.

Major RAVC
Subaltern RAVC
Company Serjeant Major RAVC
Administrative serjeant RAVC
3 X serjeant trainer RAVC
4 X corporal trainer RAVC
36 X private trainer RAVC

corporal for kennel duties
2 X driver
batman driver
31 X general dutyman
corporal cook
2 X cook

1 X light utility
1 X 15 cwt GS
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS

Cooks and general dutymen will be civilians.



REALLY MISCELLANEOUS

Headquarters Pioneer Group. War Establishment IV/71/3. March 1944.
Headquarters Pioneer Company. War Establishment IV/72A/4. December 1943.
Smoke Company, Pioneer Corps. War Establishment IV/131/2. April 1944
Area Cash Office. War Establishment IV/62A/2. December 1943.
Financial and Audit Office. War Establishment XIV/55/1. June 1944
Command Pay Office, Base Type A. War Establishment XIV/1462/1. January 1945.
Command Pay Office, Base Type B. War Establishment XIV/1463/1. January 1945.
Transit Cash Office. War Establishment XIV/1461/1. March 1945.
Prisoners of War Accounts Office. War Establishment XIV/1460/1. September 1944
Administration Unit (Civil Labour). War Establishment XIV/1185/1. June 1944.
Light Monitoring Unit. War Establishment XIV/1151/1. October 1944.
Graves Registration Unit. War Establishment IV/146/2. February 1945
Headquarters Graves Concentration Unit. War Establishment XIV/1070/1. September 1944.
Graves Concentration Section. War Establishment XIV/1071/1. September 1944.
Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force Clubs. War Establishment XIV/2006/1. August 1944.
Aliied Expedionary Force Club No1. War Establishment XIV/2007/1. August 1944.
Headquarters Fire Fighting Company. War Establishment IV/91/2. March 1943.
First Class Fire Brigade. War Establishment IV/80/2. March 1943.
Headquarters Fire Boat Company. War Establishment XIV/1056/1. July 1944
Fire Boat Section. War Establishment IV/246/1. April 1944
Military Administrative Cadre with NFS Column. War Establishment XIV/1055/1. June 1944.
Headquarters Salvage Depot (Abroad). War Establishment XIV/196/1. November 1943
Base Salvage Unit (Abroad). War Establishment XIV/197/1. November 1943.
Salvage Collecting Centre (Abroad). War Establishment IV/198/1. November 1943.
British Staff for Prisoner of War Labour Company. War Establishment XIV/1520/1. October 1944.
British Army Newspaper Unit. War Establishment XIV/2008/1. February 1945.
Headquarters War Material Reconnaissance Team. War Establishment XIV/2029/1. January 1945.
Disbandment Control Unit. War Establishment XIV/2030/1. February 1945.
No3 Chemical Defence Laboratory. War Establishment XIV/959/1. April 1945.
Dog Platoon. War Establishment XIV/906/1. May 1945.
Welfare Equipment Depot (Rear). War Establishment IV/251/1. April 1944.
Welfare Equipment Supply section. War Establishment IV/252/1. April 1944
Welfare Equipment Depot (Advanced). War Establishment IV/253/1. April 1944.



PIONEER CORPS

The Pioneer Corps provided a reliable pool of labour. Although a combatant arm the Pioneer Corps consisted largely of conscripts who were too old for fighting units or below the required medical standard. The personnel provided semi skilled personnel for a number of specialist units such as construction, quarrying and smoke generator units as well as providing labour for engineering, construction, workshops, medical evacuation etc.

The Pioneer Corps also supervised locally recruited civilian labour.

HEADQUARTERS PIONEER GROUP.
War Establishment IV/71/3. March 1944.
Lieutenant Colonel
Major
Captain Adjutant
Quartermaster
Regimental Quartermaster Serjeant
orderly room serjeant
2 X batman driver
corporal clerk
clerk
motorcyclist
4 X private
armourer serjeant REME
cook ACC

1 X bicycle
1 X motorcycle
1 X car 2 seater 4 X 2
1 X car 4 seater 4 X 2

Where a group contains any labour companies other than British one interpreter clerk will be added for each nationality.

All personnel may be unfit for general service with fighting units.



HEADQUARTERS of a PIONEER CORPS COMPANY
War Establishment IV/72A/4. December 1943.
Designed for a Pioneer Corp Company of a variable number of sections which will not normally exceed ten.
Major
Captain
4 X Subaltern
Company Serjeant Major
company quartermaster serjeant
2 X clerk
driver mechanic
2 X batman
2 X driver IC
general dutyman
2 X orderly
3 X sanitary dutyman
storeman
officers mess cook
serjeant cook
corporal cook
5 X cook

2 X bicycle
1 X car 2 seater 4 X 2
2 X 15cwt GS

One Subaltern will be added for every two sections above twelve when employed on normal work duties or ten when employed on smoke or fire watching duties.

One batman will be added for every additional three officers.

Two rank and file will be trained as stretcher bearers.

Sections were normally of ten men each.


SMOKE COMPANY, PIONEER CORPS
War Establishment IV/131/2. April 1944
Designed to operate 48 mobile generators.
Major
Captain
6 X Subaltern
Company Serjeant Major
company quartermaster serjeant
9 X serjeant
18 X corporal
27 X lance corporal
215 X private

Trades etc
4 X clerk
12 X driver mechanic
2 X batman
batman driver
8 X driver
5 X general dutyman
medical officers orderly
5 X motorcycle orderly
16 X corporal operator, smoke (driver)
80 X operator, smoke (driver)
corporal operator, smoke
9 X lance corporal operator, smoke
86 X operator, smoke
2 X sanitary dutyman
16 X section corporal
2 X storeman
10 X telephone orderly

Attached
sheet metal worker REME
serjeant vehicle mechanic REME
corporal vehicle mechanic REME
6 X vehicle mechanic

officers mess cook
serjeants mess cook
corporal cook
5 X cook

2 X leading aircraftman RAF.
Meteorological personnel plus technical equipment.

Company Headquarters
Major
Captain
2 X Subaltern
Company Serjeant Major
company quartermaster serjeant
serjeant
2 X corporal
3 X lance corporal
31 X private

Trades etc
corporal clerk
3 X clerk
2 X batman
batman driver
4 X driver
general dutyman
medical officers orderly
motorcycle orderly
corporal operator, smoke
lance corporal operator, smoke
14 X operator, smoke
2 X sanitary dutyman
2 X storeman
2 X telephone orderly

sheet metal worker REME
serjeant vehicle mechanic REME
corporal vehicle mechanic REME
6 X vehicle mechanic

officers mess cook
serjeants mess cook
corporal cook
5 X cook

2 X bicycle
2 X motorcycle
2 X light utility
1 X 15cwt GS
2 X 3 ton 4 X 2 GS

4 X Platoon
Headquarters
Subaltern
3 X driver mechanic
driver IC
general dutyman
motorcycle orderly
2 X telephone orderly

2 X motorcycle
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS

2 X Section
serjeant
2 X corporal
1 X corporal operator, smoke (driver)
10 X operator, smoke (driver)
lance corporal operator, smoke
9 X operator, smoke
2 X telephone orderly

6 X 3ton 4 X 4 GS
6 X trailer

The establishment table is for two types of equipment.
- Esso. This was an older equipment which could be carried on an Austin K2 2 ton 4 X 2 dropside lorry or towed by the Austin K2 on a four wheel trailer.
- Haslar. This was a US built equipment on a four wheel trailer. This was the equipment used in NW Europe. The 3ton 4 X 4 lorry was in fact a US Lend Lease FWD HAR-1 4 X 4, visually a typical US Army truck but 4 X 4 instead of 6 X 6.

Although designated smoke generators both types were more correctly artificial fog generators. A boiler produced steam which was mixed with oil to produce a fog. Originally the equipment was used in an anti aircraft role, producing a fog to protect potential targets. In NW Europe it was used to cover assault river crossings.



ADMINISTRATION UNIT (CIVIL LABOUR)
War Establishment XIV/1185/1. June 1944.
Supersedes War establishment VIII/646/1.
Designed to supervise 500 to 5,000 foreign workers.

Major
Subaltern Pay and Supervisory Officer
serjeant clerk in charge of pay office
clerk for pay duties
batman driver
1 X motorcycle
1 X car 2 seater

Plus
Subaltern Pay and Supervisory Officer
1 X motorcycle
for every 1,000 workers over 500

The following foreign personnel may be employed
2 X clerk
timekeeper
plus
one clerk for every 1,000 workers employed
one timekeeper for every 500 workers employed



PIONEER and CIVIL LABOUR UNIT
War Establishment XIV/1185/2. October 1944.
Designed to enrol, supervise, control and administer 7,000 artisans, skilled and unskilled labour.

Major
Captain
3 X Subaltern
Warrant Officer Class II
4 X serjeant
2 X clerk
batman driver

4 X bicycle
4 X motorcycle
2 X car light utility
1 X 3ton 4 X 2

The following civilians may be employed
2 X batman
cook
4 X clerk
2 X driver
mess orderly


The policy for the employment of labour was to retain as great a proportion as
possible on a pool basis. The only exceptions to this rule were fixed allotments
of:-
(a) Ten companies to airfield construction
(b) Fourteen companies to Transportation for loading and unloading
© Four companies to Smoke Control
(d) Four companies for pipeline construction.
On D-day thirteen pioneer companies landed on the beaches on the first tide and ten more on the second. By the end of D+2, the finish of the initial assault, three Pioneer Group HQs and forty-two companies had landed and by D+5 the total had increased to ten groups and sixty-three companies.

The first Pioneers landed in the first minutes to clear mines and to dig the command post in readiness for the beach group commander and his staff. Soon after Pioneers began to establish eight exits from the beaches to a lateral road by laying down Sommerfeld track. Other Pioneers landing on D-day unloaded and assembled bridging equipment, assisted in the preparation of bridge approaches, felled timber to construct corduroy roads while, demolished road blocks, off loaded landing craft and began the build-up of beach stores depots. Three companies specially trained in first aid and stretcher bearing were allotted to beach groups.

By 25 July all but ten companies of the entire Pioneer Corps Order of Battle comprising thirty-five groups, two hundred and fifteen companies and twenty Administrative Units (Civil Labour) totalling 63,000 officers and men, had been phased into the bridgehead. During the build-up ten companies were employed on making tactical air landing strips and one group and four companies were used on constructing the landward extension of Pluto. Casualty Clearing Stations and hospitals received an allotment of Pioneers for general duty work and stretcher bearing. Four companies were used initially for unloading ships at Mulberry B and others were employed unloading ammunition, petrol and supplies in the transhipment area, the army roadheads and corps FMCs. At one time twenty companies were employed repairing roads in the beach-head and constructing new by-passes. Other companies were attached to divisional REs for forward road work and bridging, and REME employed sections for repairing and salvaging landing craft and tanks.

Very few civilians were employed at this time in Normandy but when the army reached Belgium the policy was to replace military by civilian labour as far as possible in order to release pioneer companies for work in forward areas. 90,719 French, Belgian and Dutch were employed in December. Nearly half of these were artisans employed by the technical services of the army. In the engineer base workshops at Brussels and in the advance base workshops at Antwerp a large number of skilled men were employed as welders, electricians, mechanics and instrument makers. Ordnance used civilians as boot repairers, packers, checkers and sorters. The provision of a mid-day meal for civilian workers, plus distribution of anti-gas capes and condemned army boots to civilians employed in roadheads and petrol depots helped recruitment.

As each port was liberated the pilots and fishermen were particularly useful in work connected with the clearing of minefields, wrecks, and under-water obstacles. Local divers were employed on the entrances of the harbours, while technical artisans of the local port authority began to repair winches and railway sidings.

21 Army Group labour pool was increased by forming twenty-four Belgian and twelve Dutch pioneer companies and these were available for employment in Germany. Seven pioneer companies were employed as guards in depots, mines and on coal trains to prevent the large scale pilfering of coal.

The number of civilians directly employed over the whole British area continued to increase and reached 142,380 on 31 March.

The build up for Operation Veritable and the programme of road and rail development involved forty-one and a half pioneer companies: of these twenty were employed on road construction and maintenance, ten worked within No. 11 Canadian Army Roadhead, four and a half were employed with corps FMCs, six assisted on railway construction and one supervised the 11,000 civilians who worked at the various railheads.

During the three weeks prior to Operation Plunder eighty-seven companies, including six Belgian and nine L of C companies were under command of Second Army. Four companies were responsible for the smoke screen which covered the operational moves and dumping of stores in the forward areas from 12 March onwards. At the time of the assault there were twenty-six companies working at the army roadhead, while the allocation to each corps had been raised from four to between eight and ten companies. The latter were used on a variety of tasks which included preparing approaches to the river crossings, accompanying the assault divisions to handle ammunition and supplies, setting up FMCs on the east bank of the Rhine and helping to construct the bridges. The bank control group included a pioneer company for stretcher bearing, traffic control and guarding Prisoners of War. The remaining companies were either used on road maintenance or were employed in Casualty Clearing Stations and general hospitals.

During the pursuit the demands of armies and corps for labour were less and companies were used for guarding depots and vulnerable points, operating ex-Prisoner of War camps and guarding Prisoners of War. As the armies advanced into Germany Pioneer Corps Liaison Units organised German labour exchanges to recruit 16,689 German civilians for military purposes.

Displaced Persons were used in the area between the Maas and the Rhine and on the east bank of the Rhine to overcome the shortage of civilian labour there. At first they were engaged on a day to day basis, but later a decision was made to form three Displaced Person Groups each over one thousand strong and each administered by a pioneer company HQ.


ROYAL ARMY PAY CORP.

The Royal Army Pay Corp was responsible for
- handling pay and allowances and accounting for deductions
- maintaining personal records
- advising all units about accounting procedures.

In World War II, with a largely conscript army, since the nation accepted responsibility for paying soldiers dependants as well as the soldiers themselves. Many soldiers had a portion of their pay sent their families and many took the option of opening Post Office Savings Banks accounts. All of this generated paperwork and record keeping which made the actual handing over of cash seem simple.

Officers pay was dealt with by army agents but family allowances were introduced for married officers and the responsibility for this fell to the RAPC.


AREA CASH OFFICE
War Establishment IV/62A/2. December 1943.
Captain, Supervisory Officer
Paymaster or Assistant Paymaster
serjeant clerk RAPC
clerk RAPC

batman driver (any arm)
1 X 15cwt GS

The following personnel will be added when the Area Cash Office is located at a port and embarkation duties are required.
Captain, Embarkation Paymaster
serjeant clerk RAPC


FINANCIAL and AUDIT OFFICE.
War Establishment XIV/55/1. June 1944
Superseded War Establishment VIII/749/1

Lieutenant Colonel, Assistant Financial Adviser
3 X Major, Assistant Accountant Grade I
5 X Captain or Lieutenant, Assistant Accountant Grade II
3 X staff serjeant clerk RASC
5 X corporal clerk RASC
2 X clerk RASC including one shorthand typist
batman driver
3 X batman
2 X orderly

1 X car 4 seater

This unit to be administered by Headquarters Line of Communication.



COMMAND PAY OFFICE, BASE TYPE A.
War Establishment XIV/1462/1. January 1945.
Colonel, Command Paymaster
Lieutenant Colonel, Staff Paymaster 1st Class
3 X Major, Staff Paymaster 2nd Class
2 X Captain, Supervisory Officer (including one for cash duties)
9 X Paymaster or Assistant Paymaster (including one for cash duties)

80 X clerk RAPC including
2 X Warrant Officer Class 1
Warrant Officer Class II
7 X staff serjeant
8 X serjeant
51 X clerk (may be civilian)

officers mess cook ACC
serjeants mess cook ACC
2 X cook ACC
6 X batman
driver IC
general dutyman
3 X orderly
serjeant, officers mess orderly
serjeant, serjeants mess orderly
mess orderly
sanitary dutyman

1 X 15cwt 4 X 2 GS
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 Office

This establishment is for a force of seven divisions plus ancillary troops. For each additional division the following will be added.
Paymaster or Assistant Paymaster
staff serjeant clerk
serjeant clerk
7 X clerk



COMMAND PAY OFFICE, BASE TYPE B.
War Establishment XIV/1463/1. January 1945.
Lieutenant Colonel, Staff Paymaster 1st Class
Major, Staff Paymaster 2nd Class
Captain, Supervisory Officer (including one for cash duties)
2 X Paymaster or Assistant Paymaster (including one for cash duties)

80 X clerk RAPC including
Warrant Officer Class 1
2 X staff serjeant
4 X serjeant
22 X clerk (may be civilian)

officers mess cook ACC
serjeants mess cook ACC
2 X cook ACC
2 X batman
batman driver
general dutyman
3 X orderly
sanitary dutyman

1 X 15cwt 4 X 2 GS



TRANSIT CASH OFFICE
War Establishment XIV/1461/1. March 1945.
Administered by Forward Base Pay Office, War Establishment IV/113/1.

Captain, Supervising Officer
4 X Paymaster or Assistant Paymaster
serjeant clerk RAPC
4 X clerk RAPC

The following civilians may be employed
2 X batman
10 X clerk



PRISONERS OF WAR ACCOUNTS OFFICE RAPC
War Establishment XIV/1460/1. September 1944
Major, Staff Paymaster 2nd Class
3 X Paymaster or Assistant Paymaster
8 X clerk RAPC including
Warrant Officer Class I
2 X staff serjeant
5 X serjeant

This establishment is designed to provide for the supervision and maintenance of 4,000 officers or protected personnel accounts and 40,000 combatant other ranks accounts.

For larger numbers of accounts the following may be added:
One Paymaster or Assistant Paymaster for each additional 40,000 combatant other ranks accounts.
One Paymaster or Assistant Paymaster for each additional 5,000 officers or protected personnel accounts.
One staff serjeant clerk for each additional 40,000 combatant other ranks accounts.
One serjeant clerk for each additional 10,000 combatant other ranks accounts.
One serjeant clerk for each additional 2,000 officers or protected personnel accounts.


Pay
Supplemental French francs were specially printed in America and immediately prior to embarkation all ranks were paid 200 francs. Corps and divisional Field Cashiers embarked with a set of seven boxes of currency specially prepared in suitable note denominations and waterproofed. The value of each set was 4,750,000 francs which was estimated to cover the formations' expenditure for two weeks.

On 21 June the Base Cashier disembarked at Mulberry with 5½ tons of preloaded currency to the total value of 335,440,000 French francs. This bulk supply was safeguarded in the cellars of the Chateau de Courseulles which had been specially reinforced by concrete. Further supplies of preloaded currency were landed during the period 29 June to 17 July. In all a total of 65½ tons of francs, amounting to a sterling equivalent of £21,750,000 was despatched.

Corps and divisional Field Cash Offices landed with their formation HQ. In the first month eighteen Field and one Area Cash Office arrived and commenced to operate. No 3 Forward Base Pay Office took over the buildings of a bank in Bayeux for the purposes of distributing funds to forward cashiers and payment of military bills.

On 25 September the cash reserves previously housed in the bunkers of the radar station at Douvres, which amounted to the sterling equivalent of £32,250,000, were transferred to PARIS and deposited with the National Bank of France.

To relieve the pressure on army resources, the fullest possible use was made of civilian banks which for cash duties were for a time unofficially incorporated in the Pay Services. Post Offices, NAAFI/EFI etc. were encouraged to pay in their takings to these bank accounts wherever their location made it feasible.

Strict measures had to be introduced to prevent black market exchange of currency, and to counter inflation in occupied territory.

Prisoners of war had any money they carried impounded and a receipt was issued. The working pay for employed prisoners was paid in token money for use at canteens etc.

As so many of the men who were granted local leave on the Continent came from either Holland or Germany, it was necessary to make special arrangements for them in Paris and Brussels for currency exchanges. Civilian cashiers working under RAPC supervision were installed in each of the leave hostels. When UK leave commenced special facilities were arranged also at Calais for exchanging local currency into sterling.

All currencies held by troops moving into Germany were exchanged for Allied Military Marks. Teams of cashiers were formed for the purpose of making immediate advances of pay to liberated prisoners, while all allied liaison officers were given advances of funds to assist their own nationals. Special financial arrangements were made for Russian citizens.






LIGHT MONITORING UNIT. 21 ARMY GROUP
War Establishment XIV/1151/1. October 1944.
4 X serjeant
driver mechanic

1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS (fitted as office)
1 X trailer 1ton generator 15 KVA

Personnel may be from any arm.

Note: No clue is given as to what this unit monitors.


GRAVES.
At the outset the scale of graves units in the beach-head was as follows:-
With First Canadian Army
- two Graves Registration units (GRU)
- one Graves Concentration unit (GCU)
With Second Army- five Graves Registration units.

The first BRITISH GRUs landed on D+3 . Initially there was a shortage of prefabricated metal crosses since the 10,000 ordered had not been delivered. Graves units had to improvise
with small wooden crosses, assisted whenever possible by crosses made from RE
sources.

The frequent moves of corps throughout breakout phase made the work of the Graves Registration Units. The comparatively static conditions in the autumn which characterised this enabled the Graves Service to catch up with the locating and registration of the accumulation of graves which had been reported in previous months.

Work was commenced on permanent cemeteries in Normandy. Two Graves Registration Units were formed to work in L of C areas, in addition to in the Bayeaux area.The locating of graves of BEF personnel killed during 1939-1940 was also started.

During the months of January to May there were four British and one Canadian Graves Registration Units working in the L of C areas while four British and two Canadian units followed the advances of their respective armies. The total of graves registered during the campaign was 48,500. In addition, two British and one Canadian Graves Concentration Units concentrated 4,000 graves in Normandy and in Belgium/Holland. In January a Graves Registration Unit was specially sent from UK to register the graves of soldiers killed in 1939-40 and by the beginning of May had succeeded in dealing with 6,433 of these.


GRAVES REGISTRATION UNIT
War Establishment IV/146/2. February 1945
Captain
3 X Subaltern
batman
3 X batman driver
serjeant clerk
clerk
cook ACC
corporal draughtsman topographical RE
driver mechanic
3 X general dutyman
corporal photographer

1 X motorcycle
3 X 15cwt GS
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS



HEADQUARTERS, GRAVES CONCENTRATION UNIT
War Establishment XIV/1070/1. September 1944.
Designed to control from two to five sections.

Captain (May be a Major if three of more sections are controlled)
serjeant for Q duties
corporal clerk
batman driver
private
cook ACC
1 X 15cwt GS
1 X 10cwt trailer


GRAVES CONCENTRATION SECTION
War Establishment XIV/1071/1. September 1944.
Captain
serjeant
clerk
batman driver
private
cook ACC
1 X 15cwt GS
1 X 10cwt trailer

Pioneer, local civilian or prisoner of war labour will be attached as required up to a total of 40 personnel in each section.



HEADQUARTERS ALLIED EXPEDITIONARY FORCE CLUBS
War Establishment XIV/2006/1. August 1944.

Lieutenant Colonel
Quartermaster
serjeant clerk
clerk
2 X batman driver
1 X car 2 seater
1 X car 4 seater

Attached RAF personnel
Squadron Leader
corporal
aircraftsman 2nd class


ALLIED EXPEDITIONARY FORCE CLUB No 1
War Establishment XIV/2007/1. August 1944.

Major
Regimental Quartermaster Serjeant
staff serjeant clerk
corporal clerk
batman driver
driver IC
1 X car 2 seater
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS

Attached RAF personnel
Flight Officer
flight serjeant clerk
corporal accountant



HEADQUARTERS FIRE FIGHTING COMPANY.
War Establishment IV/91/2.
Administers two First Class Fire Brigades.
There were eighteen Fire Fighting Companies:
103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, and 120.

Captain
Subaltern
2 X NCO
7 X other ranks
1 X 15cwt
2 X motorcycle


FIRST CLASS FIRE BRIGADE
War Establishment IV/80/2. March 1943.
Headquarters plus four sections.
There were ten First Class Fire Brigades in addition to those in Fire Fighting Companies:
53, 54, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 78, and 79.

Warrant Officer Class I, Superintendent
staff serjeant
2 X fireman driver
2 X motorcyclist
cook ACC
1 X 3ton 4 X 4 GS
4 X motorcycle

Holds a reserve of:
Foam making apparatus
Oxyacetylene cutting equipment
Breathing apparatus

Fire fighting section (X4)
serjeant
corporal
2 X fireman driver
4 X fireman
1 X 3ton 4 X 4 fire tender lorry.



HEADQUARTERS FIRE BOAT COMPANY
War Establishment XIV/1056/1. July 1944
Consisting of a headquarters and a workshop section.

Designed to control, administer and maintain 15 fire boat sections on War Establishment IV/246/1. There are three divisions of five fire boat sections each. (A fire boat section consists of one fireboat). The headquarters personnel includes those for the three division headquarters and for relief personnel.

The Army Fire Service is administratively part of the Pioneer Corp.

Army Fire Service.
Major
Captain, Administrative Officer
3 X Subaltern (i/c fire boat divisions) technical

Regimental Serjeant Major, Fire Adviser
company quartermaster serjeant
3 X staff serjeant, for divisions
3 X serjeant fireman, for divisions
3 X corporal fireman
corporal clerk
clerk
3 X batman
motorcyclist
storeman

RASC
Captain
2 X Subaltern
Company Serjeant Major
serjeant clerk
4 X serjeant waterman
4 X barge engineer
clerk
2 X corporal waterman
2 X waterman
batman driver driver
duty corporal
3 X general dutyman

5 X motorcycle
1 X 15cwt GS
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS

Workshop Section RASC
Captain
Mechanist Serjeant Major
2 X staff serjeant
2 X artificer
corporal barge engineer
2 X blacksmith
corporal clerk MT
clerk MT
2 X sheetmetal worker or coppersmith
2 X electrician including a lance corporal
rigger
corporal shipwright
2 X shipwright
storeman technical
turner
10 X vehicle mechanic including a corporal and a lance corporal
batman
driver

2 X motorcycle
1 X 15cwt GS
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS
1 X 3ton 4 X 4 Machinery M
1 X 3ton 4 X 4 Stores Binned


FIRE BOAT SECTION
War Establishment IV/246/1. April 1944

Large Fireboat Section
serjeant AFS
corporal AFS
4 X fireman AFS
serjeant waterman RASC
corporal waterman RASC
corporal bargeman RASC

1 X large fireboat
1 X dinghy

Medium Fireboat Section
serjeant AFS
corporal AFS
3 X fireman AFS
serjeant waterman RASC
corporal bargeman RASC

1 X medium fireboat




MILITARY ADMINISTRATIVE CADRE with NFS COLUMN
War Establishment XIV/1055/1. June 1944.
Supersedes War Establishment VIII/730/1

Captain, Administrative Officer
company quartermaster serjeant
2 X clerk
2 X storeman


NATIONAL FIRE SERVICE COLUMN
The National Fire Service was created during the war to control both the pre war local authority fire brigades and the Civil Defence Auxiliary Fire Service. It was organised into Columns and Companies, usually with five companies to each column.

In 1944 several columns were formed for service on the Continent, it being assumed that the Occupied Countries would be lacking in fire fighting vehicles and personnel. The army was responsible for administration and supply.

NFS vehicles were standard Home Office types including Austin K2, Austin K4, Ford 7V, Ford WOT2 and Dodge 82 with various pump and escape bodies. However it is thought that the vehicles used on the Continent were Ford WOT3 30cwt. These were ex WD with GS bodies and capable of carrying or towing a trailer pump. Since no 30cwt were used in 21 Army Group many were spare. Normally NFS vehicles were painted grey but these may have remained in WD Brown or Khaki Drab.



Fire protection on land during the assault was provided by six Fire Fighting Companies, each consisting of a HQ and two First Class Fire Brigades. One company was responsible for each of the three beach sub areas, two companies for Mulberry B, the Rear Maintenance Area and No 2 Army Roadhead while the sixth was responsible for the defence of Port en Bessin and the bulk petrol installations.

The plan for sea fire defence provided for one Fire Boat Company of nineteen fire boat sections to operate four sections each at Port en Bessin, Mulberry B, Gold Sector and Juno Sector with three sections at Sword Sector. Not all the fire boats were completed by contractors in time. During the critical weather period in June sections of Mulberry B were kept afloat by continual pumping from fire boats which also carried out much salvage work among shipping.

During the advance through France and Belgium four fire fighting companies were employed, two each by First Canadian Army and Second Army, and in each case one company was deployed in corps FMCs and the other in army roadheads. Other companies were moved from the Rear Maintenance Area to Amiens where they could be called forward for re-deployment when necessary.

When HQ 7 and 8 Base Sub Areas moved into Antwerp and Ostend respectively, each had one Fire Fighting Company in close support. The Fire Fighting Company at Antwerp, in addition to extinguishing a large number of fires, contributed many hours of pumping in the port area to enable the docks to be repaired and to assist RN port parties in clearing obstructions and salvaging sunken craft. Static fire service control centres were established at Dieppe, Amiens, Antwerp and Ostend.

As operations progressed into Holland and Germany AFS resources were strained to the limit because military fire defence was still required for installations in Belgium and France. Seventeen Fire Fighting Companies and two Fire Boat Companies provided fire defence for:-
(a) Army roadheads
(b) Corps FMCs
© Bridges over the rivers Maas, Rhine, Weser and Elbe
(d) Important centres of communications in army areas
(e) Antwerp, Ghent, Ostend and Calais ports
(f) Advance base installations
(g) Bulk petrol pipelines
(h) Depots and installations in the Rear Maintenance Area

Thirty-one fire boats operated in the ports of Calais, Ostend, Ghent and Antwerp and in the Scheldt anchorages off Terneuzen. Personnel of these boats were controlled and administered by two HQ Fire Boat Companies AFS.

In Brussels a garage was requisitioned to which a large amount of captured enemy fire equipment was brought for inspection, test, repair and issue to units, depots etc. as recommended by AFS fire advisers.

Antwerp saw a great deal of AFS activity. Between 7 October and 30 March, 4,248 V 1s and 1,712 V 2s were recorded as falling within 7 Base Sub Area. V weapons were the cause of 105 fires of which one required thirty-two and another twelve AFS pumps.




HEADQUARTERS SALVAGE DEPOT (ABROAD)
War Establishment XIV/196/1. November 1943
Captain
Staff Serjeant
clerk (may be civilian)

The labour for this depot will be furnished by one or more Base Salvage Units (Abroad)



BASE SALVAGE UNIT (ABROAD)
War Establishment XIV/197/1. November 1943.
British Personnel
Subaltern
Warrant Officer Class II
2 X serjeant (one for Q duties)
serjeant ammunition examiner
batman orderly
clerk
driver IC
12 X other ranks including a corporal

Prisoners of War
3 X cook
2 X driver
group leade
sanitary dutyman

Civilian
clerk

1 X 15cwt GS
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS

The twelve other ranks are to be used as guards, overseers or as a working section.

All other ranks may be unfit for general service with fighting units.

POW and local labour will be employed as required.



SALVAGE COLLECTING CENTRE (ABROAD)
War Establishment IV/198/1. November 1943.
Subaltern
serjeant
corporal
clerk (may be civilian)
6 X private (may be civilian)



Small dumps along the beaches were manned by beach group personnel until the arrival of a Field Salvage Unit and a Salvage Collecting Centre Unit on D+8. By D+23 there were six dumps in operation.

Ammunition empties were returned through salvage channels throughout the campaign. Extra pioneer labour was permanently allotted to FMCs and roadheads for this.

During the breakout the salvage resources were greatly strained as units were required in the large areas uncovered by the advance while plenty of clearance still remained to be done in the original bridgehead.

Large quantities of materials were abandoned by the Germans in the Falaise area and No 17 Field Salvage Unit was sent to cover that area. Prisoner of War labour helped to handle this and a depot was opened at Cormelles for captured stores.

There was a serious shortage of jerricans resulting from units abandoning them in their speedy advance across France. Collecting them and transporting them was difficult as the cans were scattered far and wide but the salvage of these containers was made a matter of top priority.

The beaches required much effort to clear. Derelict Rhino ferries were broken down in order to obtain scrap steel and recover serviceable flotation tanks. Prisoner of War labour was employed. Some vehicles rescued from the derelict vehicle park were found to be repairable by REME, whilst the remaining scrap vehicles were broken down to furnace size steel. This was stock piled on the docks at Caen and arrangements were made to clear it to UK in LCTs.

Steel scrap was recovered in Belgium by various means such as cutting up flying bomb ramps and apparatus, railway guns and their mountings and also steel obstructions obtained by clearing beach defences from the coast. Another source was German ammunition which was broken down by a Belgian firm under contract, the explosive recovered being purified and made into standard demolition charges. All the scrap steel obtained from these various sources was despatched to Antwerp for shipment to UK.

The breaking up of vehicles was also started in Belgium, particularly at the salvage depot where all "written off" vehicles from the advance base vehicle parks were brought for this purpose.

In the advance through Germany the salvage units concentrated mainly on recovering enemy stores required for immediate use and clearing others from railway wagons in order to release the wagons for maintenance of the armies. Small temporary captured stores depots were established, pending the setting up of permanent depots. A wide variety of enemy stores was recovered and those required for Intelligence purposes were stocked at Antwerp where they were packed and despatched to UK.

Salvage units were deployed after each airborne operation in order to recover equipment and return it to the UK. Large quantities of airborne equipment were sorted but the recovery of parachutes was never good as many were retained by troops and civilians for the silk.



PRISONERS OF WAR.
In the initial stages all prisoners were evacuated to the UK as they accumulated day by day. Escorts provided by the War Office from D+1 were based on Southampton and crossed to the beach-head in specified LSTs to collect prisoners.

Six Prisoners of War camps, each scheduled to accommodate 200 officers and 2,000 other ranks were put at the disposal of 21 Army Group. The first of these arrived on the beaches on D+1 and was employed under command of Second Army as a collection and transit centre. Another arrived on D+5 and set up a transit cage at Arromanches. When these camps were established documentation was carried out on the Continent for those Prisoners of War who were to be retained in the theatre for labour. The policy of evacuating prisoners to the UK continued.

At the beginning of August authority was given to HQ L of C to retain in this theatre up to 40,000 Prisoners of War for labour purposes. In September this was reduced to 14,500. Arromanches and Dieppe were used as the Prisoner of War evacuation ports. About 50,000 Prisoners of War were being still held in the theatre at the end of September.

By the end of December approximately 240,000 Prisoners of War had been captured of which 170,000 had been evacuated to UK. In view of the large numbers of Prisoners of War which it was expected to capture during the forthcoming operations, and the fact that UK was unable to accept more, it was decided to construct two more Prisoners of War camps which were staffed by personnel provided by the War Office. The number of prisoners far exceeded those who were required for employment.

During the winter the problem of finding accommodation for Prisoners of War was a major difficulty. The inability of the UK to continue its function as a main base for holding Prisoner of War, made it necessary for HQ 21 Army Group to plan on making arrangements within its own resources. At the end of April, accommodation had been found for 200,000. The number of Prisoner of War camps was increased from six to thirteen, while to economise manpower the capacity of camps was varied (from the original 10,000) to 20,000 or 40,000 according to the locality. Arrangements were made to transfer 15,000 prisoners to the French government, which was itself a first installment. At the same time, arrangements were being completed to hand over 15,000 to the Belgians, mainly for work in the mines.

At the end of the campaign the enemy were not to be treated as Prisoners of War, but rated as disarmed troops. Disarmed troops would not have Prisoners of War status and were to be held as far as possible as organised bodies, under their own officers, and responsible for the main part of their own administration.

As yet the War Establishments for Prisoner of War Camps in 21 Army Group have not been found. There are establishments for camps in the UK and two for camps overseas which may apply:
Overseas Prisoner of War Camp for Officers. War Establishment IV/70B/2.
Overseas Prisoner of War Camp for Other Ranks. War Establishment IV/70C/2.


BRITISH STAFF FOR PRISONER OF WAR LABOUR COMPANY.
War Establishment XIV/1520/1. October 1944.
Captain
2 X Subaltern
Company Serjeant Major
company quartermaster serjeant
6 X serjeant
serjeant interpreter
corporal clerk
clerk
batman driver
driver
corporal postal and rations NCO

2 X bicycle
1 X car 2 seater light utility
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS

This establishment is not to be implemented while Prisoner of War labour is administered by a Prisoner of War cage.

The basic establishment is for twelve sections. The following may be added
One Subaltern for every four sections over twelve.
One serjeant for every two sections over twelve.




DISBANDMENT CONTROL UNIT.
War Establishment XIV/2030/1. February 1945.
To be attached to a brigade headquarters for administration.
Intended to supervise and control the disbandment of formed enemy units which surrendered.

Major
3 X Captain
5 X clerk including
staff serjeant
corporal
lance corporal
2 X private
3 X batman driver

3 X light utility



VETERINARY and REMOUNT
The War Establishments for Veterinary and Remount units have not been found.

There were no Veterinary and Remount units included in the original Order of Battle of 21 Army Group except a HQ staff consisting of a lieutenant colonel, major and three clerks. They assumed veterinary responsibility for all dogs on the strength of units, which were certain CMP(VP) companies and special RE dog platoons for mine detection. As far as possible all dogs had been inoculated against rabies before despatch overseas.

One Veterinary and Remount Conducting Section arrived in September and its primary role was to collect and treat battle casualties. The Falaise Gap yielded a large number of GS wagons but very few horses. Elsewhere in France five thousand captured horses were distributed to local farmers.

To ease the strain on Motor Transport it was decided to form Horsed Transport units for draught work in the L of C areas. 5 Veterinary Hospital and 2 Field Remount Depot arrived in October and carried on the task of collecting sick and wounded and selecting fit horses. Horsed Transport units were initially formed with French and Belgian labour supervised by RAVC personnel. Units were established in Antwerp, Malines, Brussels, Lille, Amiens, Dieppe and the Rear Maintenance Area. Horsed transport did invaluable work during the winter months by pulling loads through mud conditions which would have proved impassable for MT, but their most useful employment was in the docks on short haulage from the quays to the BSDs etc. These units were equipped almost entirely from captured enemy material. They were largely fed from German forage dumps.

On the closing down of the RMA No 5 Veterinary Hospital was transferred to Lille and No 2 Field Remount Depot to Bruges. These units were required to perform the dual functions of a veterinary hospital and remount depot for the horsed transport units in their respective areas. No 6 Veterinary and Remount Conducting Section came under command of Second Army to deal with animals captured during operations between the rivers Maas and Rhine.

The establishment for the Veterinary and Remount War Dogs Training Unit was not implemented as it was decided to bring the War Dogs Training School from UK. This unit had mine detecting and VP dogs under training and thus could supply them both for dog platoons RE and for CMP (VP) companies.

For the handling of Wehrmacht forces and German veterinary units three veterinary and remount conducting sections and the personnel element of two Base Depot Veterinary Stores were sent from UK, although these units would not be available before VE day. In the meantime No. 2 Field Remount Depot formed two detachments each consisting of one officer and forty other ranks to be called on by armies when required.




HEADQUARTERS WAR MATERIAL RECONNAISSANCE TEAM.
War Establishment XIV/2029/1. January 1945.
To administer up to 20 officers, 20 other ranks and 20 vehicles.
These teams were intended to assist the armies in their tasks of finding and reporting stocks of enemy war material. A number of War Material Reconnaissance Teams were formed, which were HQ staffs designed to co-ordinate service reconnaissance and collate reports to HQ 21 Army Group. These teams proved most valuable and were instrumental in uncovering and reporting on large stocks of enemy equipment, supplies, accommodation etc. throughout Germany.

A new section of Q (AE) branch of Headquartrs 21 Army Group was also formed, designated Q (AE) 4, with the task of controlling all captured enemy equipment in conjunction with G (SD), and also to undertake planning for the disarmament of Germany


Lieutenant Colonel
5 X Captain
Warrant Officer Class II Clerk
clerk
corporal vehicle mechanic
6 X batman driver
driver IC
general dutyman
motorcyclist
2 X officers mess cook
2 X cook

2 X motorcycle
6 X car 5cwt 4 X 4
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS
2 X 10cwt trailer



BRITISH ARMY NEWSPAPER UNIT
War Establishment XIV/2008/1. February 1945.

Captain, Assistant Editor
Subaltern, Chief Sub Editor
staff serjeant, sub editor
2 X serjeant reporter
serjeant, accounts
corporal, distribution and packing
2 X private, packer
3 X driver
corporal clerk RASC
clerk RASC
corporal draughtsman, topographical, RE

3 X 15cwt GS



DOG PLATOON.
War Establishment XIV/906/1. May 1945.
Supersedes War Establishment VIII/733/1.
Subaltern
serjeant
3 X corporal in charge of sections
12 X handler
batman driver
3 X driver

serjeant RAVC
cook ACC

30 X dog.

3 X motorcycle
1 X 15cwt 4 X 4 GS
3 X 3ton 4 X 4 GS
1 X 1ton trailer


No3 CHEMICAL DEFENCE LABORATORY
War Establishment XIV/959/1. April 1945.
Supersedes War Establishment III/17C/1.

Consists of a Main Laboratory and two Mobile Detachments.

Main Laboratory.
Major (Chemist)
Company Serjeant Major
serjeant, technical weapons
serjeant RAMC, for DAD Physiologist
corporal chemical laboratory assistant
corporal clerk
corporal carpenter and joiner
corporal fitter
corporal photographer
motorcycle orderly
2 X general dutyman
orderly
storeman
driver
batman
batman driver
cook ACC

1 X motorcycle
1 X car 5 cwt 4 X 4
1 X car 4 seater 4 X 2
1 X 15cwt 4 X 4 GS

Mobile Detachment 1
Captain, Chemist
serjeant chemist
general dutyman
driver
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS

Mobile Detachment 2
Subaltern, Chemist
serjeant chemist
general dutyman
driver
1 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS



WELFARE.
Welfare stores, including sports equipment, were issued before D-day. Sports equipment was specially packed in "composite" cases, as for example, the football "composite", which contained cases, bladders, laces, repair outfits, inflators, lacing-awls and dubbin. In addition, there were soccer and rugger match packs, each pack containing a complete outfit of clothing, including boots.

1,000,000 cigarettes and a supply of pipe tobacco, the gift of members and friends of the Overseas League, were shipped to the theatre each week.

Arrangements were made through the War Office with the Newspapers Association for the provision of BRITISH daily newspapers on a scale of one per ten men. The cost of provision of the newspapers was borne by NAAFI.

Five "Stars-in-Battledress" parties landed on the beaches on D+8. They gave programmes within a mile of the front line, on a stage which was usually a 3-ton lorry with the sides down. Six ENSA mobile parties arrived on D+5.

Towards the end of July, the first mobile canteens arrived, and they began at once to operate among the forward troops. Between D-day and 26 July, 5,500 wireless sets were issued. Five Army Kinema Service sections, each consisting of two dual 35 mm and eight 16 mm cinemas landed in the bridgehead between 15 June and 26 July, and cinema shows were successfully given for eight hours each day to large audiences.

With the breakout large stocks of captured enemy stores became available. 100,000 packs of playing cards, ten tons of writing paper and envelopes, and brushes of all kinds were distributed, while hotwater bottles, Eau de Cologne, powder and scissors were handed over to the medical authorities. 100,000 books were received as a gift from a publishing firm in UK.

A mobile canteen control committee was set up to control the allocation of mobile canteens. The normal scale to forward formations was three per armoured division and four per infantry division. Forward troops were always given first priority for canteens. The YMCA and Belgian Red Cross Society opened canteens immediately after our troops arrived in BRUSSELS, and on 25 September Toc H opened the first static club.

There were six ‘Stars in Battledress’ parties including ATS personnel. Assistance and equipment was given in the forming of eleven divisional and other parties within the theatre. Stage equipment, draperies, scripts and song books, amplifying sets, etc, were issued to units. In all, 150 gramophones and 13,100 records were distributed.

ENSA built up a total of twenty-four mobile parties and twelve rediffusion vans and opened fourteen garrison theatres. Six French-Belgian parties were employed with ENSA. By October ENSA was running twelve garrison cinemas and the Army Kinema Service a hundred mobile Cinemas.

During October the Rear Welfare Equipment Depot was brought forward to Brussels from the RMA. In most of the areas which contained a concentration of troops, gift shops were opened, where luxury goods such as perfume, cosmetics and toys were sold to the troops at very low prices. The most notable of these gift schemes were those run by the Second Army and by Baronne Rolin of Brussels. By December woollen comforts knitted and manufactured in UK had been distributed to the force on an allocation of at least one item per man.

During October and November over thirty canteens and clubs were set up in Brussles to cater for 10,000 troops on short leave. An appreciable proportion was operated by the BELGIAN Red Cross, largely staffed by voluntary workers.

The number of ENSA parties rose to thirty-one, and, in addition, there were eight Belgian teams organised by ENSA. There were also four "Stars in Battle-dress" parties on tour. A voluntary all-Belgium show visited units in Second Army area.

No 1 Field Broadcasting Unit arrived with four mobile 1 kw transmitters and by 7 January three broadcasting stations were working, one each in Second Army area, First Canadian Army area and advance L of C area. Each station transmitted over an area of 25 miles radius. Programmes consisted of relays of the AEF programme, gramophone records and of items specially recorded in the field. After the liberation of Eindhoven some five thousand wireless sets from local manufacture were made available for purchase.

The operation of a number of garrison cinemas was undertaken by the Army Kinema Service because ENSA was unable to open sufficient to meet the requirements of the force. AKS was called upon to show an increased number of training films.

An order was placed with the Services Central Book Depot for 100,000 Penguin books to be delivered each month.

Welfare centres, canteens and clubs were installed in large towns for troops on visit or passing through. Fifty-seven ENSA shows, including five Canadian and six French/ Belgian, were on the Continent at the beginning of May, and there were also thirty-two parties formed by service personnel, including RN, RAF, Canadian and "Stars in Battledress". Part-time entertainments included 244 dance bands and orchestras, sixty-nine unit or formation parties and twelve shows organised by Belgian and Dutch civilians.



WELFARE EQUIPMENT DEPOT (REAR)
War Establishment IV/251/1. April 1944.
For storing (up to 600tons), repairing, packing and forwarding welfare equipment.

Captain
Company Serjeant Major
batman driver
serjeant carpenter and joiner
3 X carpenter and joiner
coppersmith
serjeant clerk
corporal clerk
4 X clerk
driver IC
corporal electrician
electrician
corporal general dutyman
3 X general dutyman
corporal storeman
5 X storeman
2 X cook ACC

1 X Car 2 seater 4 X 2
1 X 15cwt 4 X 2 GS

All personnel may be of low medical category.


WELFARE EQUIPMENT SUPPLY SECTION
War Establishment IV/252/1. April 1944
To control the purchase and packing of welfare equipment.
Captain
batman
serjeant clerk
3 X clerk
corporal storeman
2 X storeman

1 X motorcycle

All personnel may be of low medical category.



WELFARE EQUIPMENT DEPOT (ADVANCED)
War Establishment IV/253/1. April 1944.
For attachment to an army or line of communication headquarters to receive and forward welfare equipment despatched from rear depot.
Subaltern
corporal clerk
clerk
3 X storeman

1 X motorcycle

All personnel may be of low medical category.



MISCELLANEOUS APPOINTMENTS
War Establishment XIV/2025/2. February 1945.
This establishment table contains a variety of miscellaneous appointments to other organisations.
1. Attached to the staff of the Flag Officer, British assault area.
Captain, Staff Officer, Royal Signals.

2. Attached to 5357 Wing RAF.
Major RE

3. Technical Staff (RE Equipment)
Captain, Technical Officer (Ministry of Supply)
batman driver
1 X Car 5cwt 4 X 4

4. For Press Communication
Captain Royal Signals
batman driver
1 X car 5cwt 4 X 4

5. Training Staff for Liaison with Belgian and Royal Netherlands Forces.
Brigadier
General Staff Officer 2nd Grade
clerk
batman
driver
1 X car 4 seater 4 X 2

6. For attachment to a specified AA Brigade
General Staff Officer 3rd Grade
1 X motorcycle

7. Deputy Chief Engineer (Permanent Bridges). HQ 21 Army Group
Brigadier, Deputy Chief Engineer, Permanent Bridges.
Major, Staff Officer, RE, Technical
Major, Staff Officer, RE, Stores
staff serjeant engineer clerk
corporal engineer clerk
lance corporal engineer clerk
serjeant engineer draughtsman
draughtsman RE (mechanical
2 X batman
2 X driver IC

1 X car 5cwt 4 X 4
1 X car 4 seater 4 X 4

Deputy Chief Engineer (Permanent Bridges). HQ 2 Army.
Identical to above except that Deputy Chief Engineer is a Colonel.

8. T Forces
General Staff Officer 2nd Grade
General Staff Officer 2nd Grade from HQ 21 Army Group.
2 X batman driver
2 X car 5cwt 4 X 4
2 X 10cwt trailer

9. Captain, Liaison Officer, REME

10. Attached to HQ 38 Group RAF
General Staff Officer 2nd Grade
clerk
driver IC
1 X light utility



ARMY KINEMATOGRAPH SERVICE.
The Army Kinematograph Service was a part of the RAOC. It was responsible for supplying and screening films. These were both training/educational and entertainment.

Army Kinematograph Service Exhibition Wing (Overseas). War Establishment III/251/2. December 1944
Army Kinematograph Service Company HQ (Overseas). War Establishment III/252/2. December 1944.
Army Kinematograph Service Section (Overseas). War Establishment IV/139/3. December 1944.
Army Kinematograph Service, Kinema Repair Detachment (Overseas). War Establishment IV/177/2. December 1944.
Army Kinematograph Service Section ATS (Overseas). War Establishment IV/273/1. December 1944.

ARMY KINEMATOGRAPH SERVICE EXHIBITION WING, RAOC (OVERSEAS)
War Establishment III/251/2. December 1944.
Headquarters
Lieutenant Colonel
Major
Captain
serjeant clerk, RAOC duties
corporal clerk, RAOC duties
2 X clerk, RAOC duties
batman driver
1 X car 4 seater 4 X 2

Reserve Section
Captain
26 X projectionist (cinema) including
Warrant Officer Class II, service engineer
Corporal for film library
2 X corporal
18 lance corporals
2 X private for film repairing
driver IC

1 X motorcycle
1 X 15cwt truck GS

Notes:
2 X 35mm and 18 X 16mm projectors will be operated by two corporals and eighteen lance corporals.
If electrical generators are required one private per generator will be added.

The following appointments may be filled by ATS personnel
Captain, at headquarters
corporal clerk
clerk
21 X projectionist, cinema including
corporal for film library
18 X lance corporal
2 X private for film repairing




ARMY KINEMATOGRAPH SERVICE COMPANY HEADQUARTERS, RAOC (OVERSEAS)
War Establishment III/252/2. December 1944.
Major
batman driver
serjeant clerk, RAOC duties
lance corporal clerk, RAOC duties
clerk, RAOC duties
1 X car 4 X 2 light utility



ARMY KINEMATOGRAPH SERVICE SECTION, RAOC, (OVERSEAS)
War Establishment IV/139/3. December 1944.
Captain
corporal clerk
clerk
23 X projectionist including
staff serjeant, service engineer
10 X corporal
10 X private
2 X private for film repair duties
staff serjeant storeman
lance corporal storeman
batman driver
general dutyman

corporal vehicle mechanic REME

1 X motorcycle
1 X car light utility
8 X 15cwt GS
2 X 3ton 4 X 2 GS modified to carry 35mm equipment
1 X 3ton 4 X 4 office modified as workshop and office
1 X 3ton 6 X 6 GS modified as film library and store

If required
staff serjeant storeman may be replaced by a staff serjeant clerk
lance corporal storeman may be replaced by a lance corporal projectionist
car light utility may be replaced by a 15cwt GS.



ARMY KINEMATOGRAPH SERVICE, KINEMA REPAIR DETACHMENT RAOC (OVERSEAS).
War Establishment IV/177/2. December 1944.
For attachment to a base workshop REME for administration.
Clerk RAOC
Driver IC
Warrant Officer Class II Projectionist
2 X staff serjeant projectionist
2 X instrument mechanic (field) REME
1 X motorcycle
1 X 15cwt GS


ARMY KINEMATOGRAPH SERVICE, KINEMA SECTION ATS (OVERSEAS).
War Establishment IV/273/1. December 1944.
Junior Commander
Subaltern, for technical duties
corporal clerk, administration
clerk, administration
staff serjeant clerk
lance corporal clerk
2 X cook
10 X corporal projectionist
10 X lance corporal projectionist
storeman, technical
corporal vehicle mechanic
2 X film repairer
house orderly
2 X mess orderly

1 X car light utility
10 X 15cwt GS
1 X 3ton 4 X 4 office modified as workshop and office
1 X 3ton 6 X 6 GS modified as film library and store
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users