Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Walter Leigh, 4th Hussars, RAC


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 geoff501

geoff501

    1.0594630943592952645618252949463

  • Registered Users
  • 2,120 posts
  • LocationHut Six

Posted 16 December 2009 - 09:51 AM

Listening to Rob Cowan on Radio 3 this morning, he played (I think) Concertino for Harpsichord and String Orchestra by composer Walter Leigh who was killed in action near Tobruk in 1942.

Very impressed with the piece.


Walter Leigh - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


From the search engine:

CWGC :: Casualty Details


Name:LEIGH, WALTER
Initials:W
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Trooper
Regiment/Service: Royal Armoured Corps
Unit Text: 4th Queen's Own Hussars
Date of Death: 12/06/1942
Service No: 7931725
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: 10. A. 23.
Cemetery: KNIGHTSBRIDGE WAR CEMETERY, ACROMA
  • 0
The WW2 Commonwealth Casualty Search Engine:
http://www.hut-six.c.../search39-47.php

"Well, the most important thing that was new was the idea of URI -- or URL. The idea that any piece of information anywhere should have an identifier, which will not only identify it, but allow you to get hold of it. That idea was the basic clue to the universality of the Web. That was the only thing I insisted upon." Tim Berners-Lee.





#2 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,757 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 16 December 2009 - 10:36 AM

From War Diary
War Diary of the 4th Hussars in 1942

12/6/1942
RHQ, C and HQ Sqns left EL DUDA at 0630 hours for CAPUZZO area, arriving 1500 hours at BIR BEDER. A Sqn, 6 Stuarts, with 4 Stuarts, 3 Grants and 1 Crusader attached, remained at EL DUDA as rearguard to TDS. At EL DUDA the Sqn was machine gunned by one of our own fighters, resulting in the death of Sgt Shill, LCpl Duckering and LCpl Leigh. One OR was wounded. The deceased were buried at approx 428412. B Sqn. At 1430 hours, the Sqn (10 Grants) with 1 Crusader (3rd CLY) attached, was ordered to engage 8 Armd Cars and 9 M13’s at MADURET EL GHESCEUASC. Whilst engaging these, approx 12 Mk IIIs and 8 MK IVs, supported by 8 x 88mm and a number of 50mm guns, appeared from the direction of B.702 384402. From this action only 1 Tank succeeded in escaping. This was 2Lt Cartmell. Apart from this crew, only 2Lt RGH Walker and Cpl Murray have returned, both wounded. Nothing further is known about the rest of the Tank crews. A Echelon was attacked by high level bombers at 384416. Tpr Hyde and Tpr Hilliard were killed and were buried on the spot. No personal effects could be recovered. LCpl Chattaway, LCpl Vyse and Tpr Deacon were wounded. LCpl Chattaway died of wounds later the same day.


  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#3 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,757 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 16 December 2009 - 10:46 AM

one of his albums is on here to listen to.

http://www.last.fm/m...g Orchestra etc.


Photo of him from here.
Walter Leigh | Classical Composers Database

Attached Files


  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#4 dbf

dbf

    Captionless

  • Registered Users
  • 14,971 posts
  • LocationState of Moribund

Posted 16 December 2009 - 11:00 AM

From The Times, July 20, 1942:

LCE.-CPL. WALTER LEIGH
COMIC OPERA AND CHAMBER MUSIC


The death of Lance-Corporal Walter Leigh, Hussars, at the age of 37, on active service in Libya is a loss to English music in its most precarious tradition - that of the stage. For his two comic operas, The Pride of the Regiment and Jolly Roger, followed in the Sullivan tradition of satire and burlesque served up with frank melody and good craftmanship.

Besides these two operas Leigh wrote much other dramatic music:- For the straight stage, when he directed the music of the Festival Theatre at Cambridge; for the Cambridge Greek Play Committee, when in 1936 he set The Frogs of Aristophes; for revue, as in Clinton-Baddeley's Aladdin and in Nine Sharp; and for films.

Leigh also wrote chamber music, a concerto for harpsichord and orchestra, and miscellaneous songs and piano pieces. His versatility and businesslike attitude to the matter in hand he had learned from Hindemith, with whom he studied for two years after an English training with Dr. Darke and Professor Dent and after taking an arts degree at Cambridge. His style was simple, effective, and well turned, and, through all the frantic experimentation of the years between the wars, he kept his head, his ideals, and his popular touch.


From The Times, Aug 25, 1942:

LANCE-CORPORAL WALTER LEIGH
A correspondent writes:-
The death of Lance-Corporal Walter Leigh on active service in Libya deprives both British music and British films of one of the best and most sincere of contemporary composers. After a brilliant career at Cambridge in the late twenties he studied music under Hindemith. Leigh was probably the best known to the general public for the music which he wrote for a number of intimate revues and for such operas as The Pride of the Regiment and Jolly Roger.

His more serious works included chamber music, songs, and several concertos, and he was moreover, the first British composer to undertake a complete study of the many problems relating to the sound-track in the production of films. In this respect he was closely associated with the makers of documentary films from 1933 until the outbreak of the present war, when he joined the Hussars in the ranks. His sound score for the film Song of Ceylon still remains a classic example of the creative use of music and sound in relation to the visuals on the screen. One of the last film scores he composed before joining the Army was that for a film of The Times.


Attachment from Times Aug 8, 1942

Attached Files


Edited by dbf, 16 December 2009 - 11:06 AM.

  • 0

#5 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,757 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 16 December 2009 - 11:09 AM

Another photo.
Posted Image

9th March 1933: Composer Walter Leigh, whose work 'Jolly Roger', a musical burlesque is playing at the Savoy theatre in London, with his fiancee Marion Blandford. (Photo by Sasha/Getty Images)

Getty Images - Unsupported browser detected
  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#6 Owen

Owen

    Immoderator

  • Super Moderators
  • 18,757 posts
  • LocationUnder the stairs

Posted 16 December 2009 - 11:13 AM

Just see he did some music for a film by the GPO Film Unit in 1936

Sevilla Festival de Cine Europeo | Seville European Film Festival

The Fairy of the Phone

Music: Walter Leigh


By the 1930s the telephone was fast becoming a mass communication device but there were still many people who were reluctant to accept such a sophisticatedpiece of technology into their homes. Eccentrically styled as a lavish musical revue, complete with a chorus line of telephone operators singing along to a sprightly score by Walter Leigh, the film sets out to promote use of the telephone. Walter’s sister, Charlotte Leigh, a popular stage star at the time, fuels the film’s eccentricity with her particular brand of off-beat comedy. Artist William Coldstream worked as an employee of the GPO Film Unit from 1934 to 1937, assisting Cavalcanti, before going on to direct films himself.


Here on You Tube.
YouTube - The Fairy of the Phone (1936) edited
  • 0

If you have any questions about the forum don't ask me, ask Adam - von Poop


#7 dbf

dbf

    Captionless

  • Registered Users
  • 14,971 posts
  • LocationState of Moribund

Posted 16 December 2009 - 11:37 AM

Just see he did some music for a film by the GPO Film Unit in 1936

Here on You Tube.
YouTube - The Fairy of the Phone (1936) edited


A verrritable lesson on how to rrroll ones rrrr's.
  • 0

#8 geoff501

geoff501

    1.0594630943592952645618252949463

  • Registered Users
  • 2,120 posts
  • LocationHut Six

Posted 16 December 2009 - 11:50 AM

one of his albums is on here to listen to.....
[/URL]

Great stuff. Link didn't work but a search found it. It's got the harpsichord concertino there! Thanks.
  • 0
The WW2 Commonwealth Casualty Search Engine:
http://www.hut-six.c.../search39-47.php

"Well, the most important thing that was new was the idea of URI -- or URL. The idea that any piece of information anywhere should have an identifier, which will not only identify it, but allow you to get hold of it. That idea was the basic clue to the universality of the Web. That was the only thing I insisted upon." Tim Berners-Lee.





#9 keighdey

keighdey

    Junior Member

  • Registered Users
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 30 December 2009 - 12:06 PM

This might be of interest to you. There is a CD of Leigh's piano music and songs released on Tremula Records which is obtainable from www.jansmusic.co.uk featuring such gems as "Music for Three Pianos" and "Eclogue".
  • 0

#10 DannyHarrison

DannyHarrison

    Member

  • Registered Users
  • PipPipPip
  • 59 posts

Posted 14 December 2010 - 08:30 PM

Hello All,

I think my Grandad was involved in the same action at Bir bellefaa about 12 miles south of Acroma. He was in command of a stuart tank issued to them at Capuzzo on the 4/5th June 1942. The action took place on the 12th June 1942 and my Grandad was wounded and captured and later a POW in Italy and then Germany. He saw the following men Killed C/pl Berry F. 7899417, Trooper Gardner G.G.M 2987511, Trooper Murphy M. 7934151 and the following men were badly wounded and unlikely to have evacuated their tanks : Lance Sergeant Workman .P 7883444, Trooper Starring G.A. 7926822, Trooper Omerod J.S. 366033, Trooper Andrews G.R. 7942162, and Trooper Hutchison number and Initials unknown. I would be greatfull if anybody could confirm this was the same action?
Best Regards
Danny Harrison
  • 0

#11 Ron Goldstein

Ron Goldstein

    WW2 Veteran

  • Veterans
  • 5,740 posts
  • LocationLondon

Posted 15 December 2010 - 07:38 AM

Most interesting, especially because he served in my old unit but long before I joined them in March '45.

On the day he was killed, 12th June '42 I was still "treading water" in the tiny village of Houghton Regis eagerly awaiting my call-up.

RIP Walter

Ron
  • 0

If I am not for myself, then who will be for me?
And if I am only for myself, what am I?
And if not now, when?
Rabbi Hillel circa 30 BCE


:peepwalla:

 

I was "called-up", as a 19 year old, on the 1st of Oct 1942 and was one of 5 serving brothers, one of whom, Jack, was in RAF Bomber Command and was killed on March 16th 1945.

I served as a Driver/Op (Wireless Operator) with the 49th Light Anti Aircraft Rgt. (78 Div) from Apr 1943 to Dec 1944 (North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Egypt). The Regiment was disbanded in Dec 1944 and I was retrained (in Italy) by the Royal Armoured Corps.

 

Finally, I served as Loader/Op with the 4th Queen's Own Hussars (6th Armd.,78th & 56 Div) from Mar 1945 to Dec 1946 (Italy, Austria, Germany) finishing up as Tech Cpl. for "A" Sqdrn.  I was "De-mobbed" in Apr 1947

http://www.blogger.c...947129038825503


#12 geoff501

geoff501

    1.0594630943592952645618252949463

  • Registered Users
  • 2,120 posts
  • LocationHut Six

Posted 15 December 2010 - 11:08 AM

Some samples here:

Walter Leigh: A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Frogs, Music for String Orchestra etc.: Various Artists: Amazon.co.uk: MP3 Downloads
  • 0
The WW2 Commonwealth Casualty Search Engine:
http://www.hut-six.c.../search39-47.php

"Well, the most important thing that was new was the idea of URI -- or URL. The idea that any piece of information anywhere should have an identifier, which will not only identify it, but allow you to get hold of it. That idea was the basic clue to the universality of the Web. That was the only thing I insisted upon." Tim Berners-Lee.





#13 geoff501

geoff501

    1.0594630943592952645618252949463

  • Registered Users
  • 2,120 posts
  • LocationHut Six

Posted 15 December 2010 - 11:23 AM

Welcome to the forum Danny. If you don't already have the DCM citation, it should be on the NA website. If you can find the appropriate digital microfilm file, the download is free. It should be in the WO 373/16 file.
  • 0
The WW2 Commonwealth Casualty Search Engine:
http://www.hut-six.c.../search39-47.php

"Well, the most important thing that was new was the idea of URI -- or URL. The idea that any piece of information anywhere should have an identifier, which will not only identify it, but allow you to get hold of it. That idea was the basic clue to the universality of the Web. That was the only thing I insisted upon." Tim Berners-Lee.





#14 Little B

Little B

    Junior Member

  • Registered Users
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 07 March 2012 - 03:38 PM

My Dad, Walter Little, possibly known as Eric to his fellow troopers, Trained and served with Walter Leigh and they became good friends. His name often cropped up in Dad's stories about the Desert Campaign and I know that Dad held him in high regard for his intelligence, gentleness and modesty. While they were learning Morse code in order to become radio operators, Walter Leigh was the first in their class to understand the stream of code in their headphones. He suddenly cried out, "Don't listen to the dits and dahs, listen to the rhythm!"
When they visited town on an evening off they passed a poster on the wall advertising a show with music by Walter Leigh. They all joked about the coincidence with the name until Walter Leigh finally confessed that he was the composer - he had never mentioned his talent to any of his new friends.
Dad was with him when he died. An aircraft flew low and strafed their camp and Walter Leigh was fatally injured. Dad said that he apologised to those who were trying to help him "for being a nuisance" - a truly brave gentleman to the end. I wish I could have known him.
  • 0

#15 geoff501

geoff501

    1.0594630943592952645618252949463

  • Registered Users
  • 2,120 posts
  • LocationHut Six

Posted 07 March 2012 - 05:29 PM

welcome to The Forum, Little B and thanks for sharing the story.
  • 0
The WW2 Commonwealth Casualty Search Engine:
http://www.hut-six.c.../search39-47.php

"Well, the most important thing that was new was the idea of URI -- or URL. The idea that any piece of information anywhere should have an identifier, which will not only identify it, but allow you to get hold of it. That idea was the basic clue to the universality of the Web. That was the only thing I insisted upon." Tim Berners-Lee.





#16 Recce_Mitch

Recce_Mitch

    Very Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 4,681 posts
  • LocationFremantle, West Australia

Posted 08 March 2012 - 12:25 AM

Welome to the forum, Little B and thank you for sharing your fathers tale.

Cheers
Paul
  • 0

:poppy: In memory of all those of the Recce Regiments who lost their lives in World War 2 :poppy:





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users